449: Leadership & The Power Of Failure – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2

This week: 

Leadership
Nikki Henry wants leaders to communicate effectively, set clear expectations, break down barriers, embrace DEI, and more. She’s CEO of Ladies Leading Ladies and she spills it all.

The Power Of Failure
Failures are as powerful as success stories to rally folks around your cause. Whitney Raver encourages you to embrace your bungles and botches – and share them with your communities. She’s chief development strategist at What’s The Word. 

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

View Full Transcript
Transcript for 449_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_20190719.mp3

Processed on: 2019-07-20T15:18:54.577Z
S3 bucket containing transcription results: transcript.results
Link to bucket: s3.console.aws.amazon.com/s3/buckets/transcript.results
Path to JSON: 2019…07…449_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_20190719.mp3.885012872.json
Path to text: transcripts/2019/07/449_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_20190719.txt

Hello and welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit Radio Big non-profit ideas for the other 95% on your aptly named host. Oh, the Video guide for non-profit marketing, which is the definitive guide. I’m in it, they quoted me. Ah, and it’s a very astute, articulate on accurate quote. They got it right, Um, in all its students and articulateness, this guide is from type Ito T y p i t o type a type edo dot com. They’re the canvas of video. The guide includes the strategic like acquisition, engagement, stewardship and tactical, like lower thirds and captioning and text animation. You’ll find this thing that I’m in at t y p i t o dot com and I thank them for including me and I’m glad you’re with me. I’d get slapped with a diagnosis of Dalek. Oh, several ism if you hit me with the heady idea that you missed today’s show leadership. Nikki Henry wants leaders to communicate effectively set clear expectations, break down barriers embrace D I and more. She’s CEO of ladies leading ladies, and she spills it all. Then the power of failure failures are as powerful as success stories to rally folks around your cause, Whitney Raver encourages you to embrace your bungles and Boches and share them with your communities. She’s chief development strategist at What’s the Word on Tony Steak, too? Show number 450 Responsive by Wagner C. P A’s guiding you beyond the numbers. Wagner cps dot com By koegler Mountain Software, Denali, fundez. They’re complete accounting solution made for non-profits tony dot m a slash Cougar Mountain for a free 60 day trial and by turned to communication, Shin’s PR and content. For non-profits, your story is their mission. Turn hyphen to DOT CEO. Here’s Nicky Henry and leadership. It’s my pleasure to welcome to the show Nikki Henry. She is the founder and CEO of Ladies Leading Ladies, a company dedicated to helping women and non binary people grow as supportive leaders. She’s a passionate dork. She’s at ladies underscore leading underscore, and the company is at ladies leading ladies dot com. Welcome to non-profit radio. Nikki Henry. Thank you so much, Tony. My pleasure. What’s a passionate dork? So I call myself a dork because I am super, uh, nerdy in the way that I want to make sure that data and research backs up what I am teaching with leadership. As I was growing as a leader, I always went back to the data and research and my undergrads in psychology. So I just have that nerdy numbers data research part of me. But I’m super passionate, and I I have worked in non-profits for the last decade because I care about families, and I care about our communities. Okay. Uh, it’s fair. Of course. You know, that was that. I didn’t label you that. That’s Ah, that’s your idea, That is, um So we were supposed to connect that? Ah, 1990 sea. And then you were so passionate about helping your audience on. They wanted so much of you afterwards that you couldn’t make it to the recordings boost on time. And so now so here we are, many months later, but I’m glad it worked. Doubt metoo piela very. For a while, I was a little I was a little noncommunicative. You e mailed. And then I said Okay, hold on. I’ll get I’ll get to you when you know when I have a breaking schedule. So I don’t know. I hope that, uh see, I like Esso I was not reaching out. Um, I like to lead by fear and intimidation. Um uh, condescension. You, no doubt. So that’s my style. That’s right. That’s why that’s why I wasn’t getting back to you. I mean, we could have done this the first week after ntcdinosaur. I wanted to exercise my leadership in my, uh, my white male privilege and authority. Oh, my goodness. Just so fun. Yeah. So I feel like that’s my leadership style. Is that is that is that in line with what you’re doing at the lady’s leading ladies? You know, I feel like you just did my intro and the opposite. Yeah. Okay, so my my method is the antithesis of yours. I would say so. All right. I don’t know. Fear and doubt and loathing and condescension. They seem to work well for me, but all right way don’t have to go down that way. Um, So you want Thio? Well, tell me what leading ladies leading ladies is about. Yeah. So this company really came out of my own experience in the workplace. And like I said, I spent about 10 years in non-profits working in different leadership roles, and I noticed a couple of things. One, especially in the nonprofit world, were very much trial by fire. I got thrown in, um, you know, as a first time leader and had to figure it out. So there was a lot of that imposter syndrome going on with me. A lot of the scared that people are gonna find out. I don’t know what the heck I’m doing. Um and so I just dove into teaching myself. So I definitely saw that piece. I saw that lack and I saw that white space, especially with our non-profits on properly training and investing in our leaders so that we conserve our community’s best. And the second thing I saw is one of the programs that I worked with. We scaled rapidly over a five year period. We went from four full time employees to 55 during that time that I was there. And so we had a ton going on. And what I noticed was specifically the women that I worked with who were incredibly hard working so intelligent, um, and had been with me from the get go, weren’t throwing their hat in the ring for those promotions. And for those management opportunities. And so I got to really chat with them and dig in. But I know this isn’t a unique problem. This is something that we’re facing in our workplaces where we have a lack of representation of really strong, amazing women in those leadership roles. Okay. And you want to turn that around Exactly. Okay. Uh, so you’re some of your advice is around effective communications for women. So what are what are what are women not getting right that they could be doing better around communications And And how do we sex it? You know what’s fun s o with the with the business. I really have a passion around bringing women and non binary people into representation and leadership. But what I teach is not gender specific. And what I actually found, the more that I dug into research and data, you know, from Gallup in different areas is that if we’re gonna go with gender stereotypes, women are actually better prepared to be the most effective leaders. Based on what the data is showing us, an effective leader looks like. And what that means is now we need coaches. We don’t need managers. We need. People who are focusing on relationships are focusing on development are focusing on, um, that communication, bringing together multiple perspectives and really creating a team versus just the top down, you know, crack the whip type of accountability that we may have had in the past and may still have in many workplaces. So it’s really about that communication and getting to know your people one on one as human beings and how you can uniquely motivate them to be the most successful team member that they could be. Okay, s o teamwork. Collaborative. You know, people, uh, we just have, like, a minute and 1/2 or so before before our break. What? How come we, uh s So how can we break down the barriers that exist between leader and following, You know, whatever Employer, employee advisor, supervisor worker. I mean, is it as simple as just like social events o r. Go deeper? I think it’s deeper, and I think it’s two main things. I think that it’s training and rewarding our leadership for being those supportive leaders or as burn a Brown says a daring leader. Um and then the second piece is really focusing on diversity equity and inclusion. I know you were speaking about that on a previous podcast where we really have to dive into our own identity is the identities of those that were working with and be able to really embrace the assets that come along with that diversity and an inclusive workplace. Yeah. Yeah, we did. We get ah, a couple of d I topics and 19 ntc and we talked about it before that. Um right. Why don’t we, uh, take our break right now? Pursuant. They’ve got a podcast as well, and there’s there’s is go beyond. It’s hosted by their vice president, Taylor Shanklin, who’ve been a guest on non-profit radio a couple times. Ah, a couple of recent episodes of go beyond our Self Care for Leaders and four digital trends. For 2019 you will find the podcast Go beyond at pursuing dot com slash Resource is now let’s go back. Thio. Nikki Henry. Okay. Thank you for that indulgence, Nikki. Henry. Absolutely. Go take care of our our sponsors. Um all right. Um So how do we so I’d like to get into some some, you know. How do you do it? Not just not just not just what to do, but but how So how can How can an effective leader get to know they’re there? There, folks better abila more, more personally. You know, as you were saying, Yeah, So at 19 NTC, um, I was going through this with our group there and some of the three top things that I really focus on our your communication. So both in meetings and facilitating those meetings, setting clear goals and just motivating and engaging your team. So one of the things that I really push, um, and have seen work in my own work but also in others is that our leaders take time to sit down one on one on a weekly basis with each of their direct reports. And when I say that people screeched to a halt because nobody needs more mean eight meetings, nobody wants to be stuck in meetings more than they already are. Right? So it’s really about how to make those meetings productive. Um, And how Thio, I understand that making that investment of time these weekly one on ones or 25 30 minutes make that investment of time is actually going to give you more time on the return because you’re having less of people knocking on your door and saying Hey, do you have a minute? Hey, can I ask you a question? Hate kanai This on the same page? You’re aligning at least weekly. Nobody. Converium off course too far if you’re really talking on a weekly basis and you work into that weekly conversation a human element as well. So asking people about their Weiqing of weekend asking people about their family and making sure that there is that human element in it as well as we move forward. Okay, this is related to something I just read on Seth Gordon’s Blawg. Okay, basically, he was talking about slack. You know that we don’t have to be so tightly, um timed and so efficient in the in the short term that in the long term we’re going to suffer. He uses the analogy of airplanes the way you know it. Sze time down to the minute. And if there’s a storm, you know when every plane is being utilized in the short time in the immediate term there’s a storm or a breakdown of an aircraft, there’s no slack built in. So the whole system cascades and can collapse. If there’s a storm in L. A or New York or Chicago Santa, um, the whole country can come to a halt aircraft. So, um, you know, So his recommendation is, you know, don’t be so short term focused and build in some what you might consider to be inefficiency in the short term. But in the long term, it’s gonna be it’s gonna give you rewards. That sounds like you’re saying, have these weekly 30 minute meetings. Um, what you’re gonna know they’re gonna cause you a little tightness in, but in the long run, you’ll get you’ll get Amore, I guess Committed employees who you get to know someone who’s gonna be more likely to come to you with a problem instead of quit when there’s a problem. Exactly. Take a week of Lee sick leave and then quit while there’s reportedly sick. They’re out looking for you. Actually had an interview. Yeah. Yeah, they’re gonna talk to you and you’ll develop amore more committed. More, more collaborative employees. Exactly. All right. All right. So 30 minutes, 30 minute, one on ones. You okay? What What else do you like to see so and a lot of these, they might sound like we’re going back to the basics, right? But another latto always. That’s not always, but that’s not always bad. Yes, we could use a more basic. So I think it’s important because we might know these things. But practicing them is a whole different thing. So I also talk about smart girls, which again people kind of roll their eyes because I asked everyone in the room How many of you have heard of smart goals? Almost everyone raises their hands, right? And then I asked people, How many of you are utilizing that when you give out, you know, a task list or goals to your team members? Crickets? Very rarely are people actually looking at. Okay, we’re talking about what our priorities are for the weak. I’m, you know, helping someone to set those priorities. But I didn’t take the extra 30 seconds, one minute, two minutes to go through and make sure that it was specific that we know how we’re measuring success. But it’s actually achievable that it’s relevant to what we’re working on the big picture. So we’re not just doing busywork and that there’s a deadline that were clear. And if we actually took those act extra 30 seconds to two minutes to go through that with things that were asking of our team, we would have such a more efficient workplace. But also we would have such a better relationship because our expectations are a lie. And we know what’s being asked of us. We have clear expectations. And also, as a leader, you’re going to get a project or a product that is actually what you asked for versus that person trying to read your mind and ending up. You get something and you say, What the heck is? This is not what I asked for it all. And you know okay, yeah, clear expectations, any anything. So let’s ah, shift a little bit from Well, they’re all related. But expect eight expectations setting no more advice around making that clear for people. Yes, I think that you know, those two things really tied together. So the smart girls on the one on ones because you want to be talking early often, Um, and especially as we are in Thio, a millennial generation that’s taking you know, is the largest part of our work force. You’re gonna see the same with Jen’s e J. Expect early and often immediate feedback. And so that’s going to increase that relationship. Increase that communication and decrease the times that you’re really going to end up with someone not understanding their expectations and veering off course so early and often regular feedback, both good and bad. Eso really balancing those? The other thing that I will say, especially because you’re putting these extra meetings on um on the calendar, is don’t hold meetings that could have been an email, so you’re already taken the time to sit down one on one. Don’t hold the weekly staff meeting or the weekly department meeting. If you’ve got nothing to say. If you’ve got no nothing that needs to be brainstorm or worked out as a team, if it’s just an update to policy, it’s a memo. It’s a schedule whole thing. Shoot it in an email, don’t add more time to meetings because that’s why people really, really dread them is because they’re just sitting in something that they could have read in an email in five minutes. Okay, you’re, uh go, Just go on back to the first point you made about being honest. You know it, Sze totally unfair to an employee Thio to find out at the annual or the semi annual performance review that you know there’s a problem with something exactly. And it’s been festering for months. For months or something, you never give the person a chance. Toe improve. Now you’re now it’s formal. Now it’s written now. Now they feel like they’ve been shat on Andi and they got like, a blind sided races versus having a conversation with him in one of the 30 minute one on one meetings. You know, there’s a problem. This is not. This is not the way we I want this done or you’re not meeting expectations or whatever the heck it is from from the hours you keep to the attire to the to the smelly food you do in the kitchen. You know, whatever it is, you’ve got to tell people and give them a chance to improve. Absolutely. And it’s something that leaders really struggle with, right? There’s a lot of the times were promoted into leadership positions because of the good job that we did in our last position, not because we particularly have leadership skills or or those types of things. It’s a reward for doing a good job. And so that means that we get a lot of leaders who haven’t had any leadership training. I think the last study that I looked at, over 45% of current leaders and managers have had no leadership or management training at all. We treat it as if it’s a talent or a natural ability, where, as it’s a skill just like learning, excel or learning a new database, Um and so a lot of people are conflict avoidance. And so they have a hard time having those easy at the beginning conversations about you know, Hey, you’re wearing too much perfume and it’s given so and so a headache. You know, something silly like that. They don’t have that up front, and then it turns into like what you’re saying. They’re being blindsided in a formal evaluation instead of just having a quick conversation. So building those relationships and trust and respect on a weekly basis also helps the leader to be more comfortable to bring those things about with with their employees and with their team members. But it’s also something that has to be practiced, and it has to be rewarded in the workplace as well for our leaders to be assertive and thio Thio knit problems in the bud and have those open and frank conversations. If someone says they don’t have enough time to do 30 minute meetings with everyone that reports to them, does that mean they have too many direct reports? So I was just going to say I have one of two answers. Either you are overseeing too many people directly, Um, or you are You don’t have any time because your people are constantly interrupting you. So there’s, you know, to kind of pieces to that. So if you’re generally speaking, if you are overseeing more than 10 people directly meaning there is no level of, you know someone in between, there’s not another person. They can go to. A lot of the time CEOs think. Well, I oversee the entire company. No, no, no. Just your direct reports. Um, if you’re overseeing more than 10 then probably you’re not able to give them the time that they need to be a coach versus just being a manager, and that is going to hold back your employee engagement, which then holds back the success of your teams in the success of your organization. So that is one thing. But the other piece is people think that they don’t have time. Well, if you took intentional time with your team, you would see within a month. If you really committed to this, you would see a huge amount of time saved because you were dealing with it on the front end, versus being reactive. Okay. Okay, Cool. Um, how about some motivation, huh? You touched on little Bit’s talk about explicitly motive motivating the folks who work for you. Yeah. So each of your each of your employees is a unique human being there in the work that they do for unique reasons. So getting to know them in those weekly meetings and elsewhere to understand why the they do the work they do is gonna be incredibly helpful to you as a leader, because then you can tap that’s specific reason to help motivate them. But more generally, I think there are a couple of things that we can do to motivate and create an engaging work environment as well. I think one thing is encouraging friendships at work. So not being the boss that walks into the room and then everyone’s a she because you’re not supposed to be talking, um, so allowing that also creating opportunities for people tohave lunches together to get together off the clock toe, you know, feel like they can actually create, um, these relationships that help them to be more resilient in the workplace. And I think also one huge piece of motivation that I think is often missed is talking to people about their long term development. And I talk a lot about doing that through what I call stay interviews and not just me. Everybody calls him stay interviews, Um, but a stay interview is a play on an exit interview. We get all of this really robust, amazing information when people walk out the door. Well, why don’t we ask those questions once or twice a year or once 1/4 and get that really important information? While we still have the talent, Let’s keep the town. Let’s retain them so deeper into their development in their long term career planning. So asking questions like what is it that troubles you here. What would you do differently like that? Exactly? Yeah. Taking exactly those exit interview questions and turning them into stay interview. So why do you work here? What do you love most about your job? What would you change if you had a magic wand and have that authority to do? So? What are some benefits that would make a difference to you wanting to stick around in this job? You know, things like that. Okay, Uh, now on the friend you know, that sort of developing the friendship side. I’ve had people say that they resent some of that. Why did they have to be friends with co workers? They’re they’re happy to have them. His coworkers. Why do they have to take them on his friends? I you know, and I totally get that. And I hear that as well from folks. And here’s the reason why, as a manager or a leader, you should push this because through research and study specifically through Gallup, they have shown that those who have a best friend at work are significantly more engaged and therefore significantly more productive at work. And when you think about it just, you know, anecdotally. Of course, If I got to show up every day and work with my best friend, I’m probably gonna be more happy to be there more eager to show up. You know, a happier human being and knowing that I have someone that I trust that I convinced to all of those things having that resiliency within the workplace is is fantastic. Not everyone’s gonna do it. Not everyone is going to be that engaged employees. They’re gonna be that there are going to be the types that one o’clock and clock out, go home, not talk about their personal life. Keep a very compartmentalized life. But I will say is the generations go on. That’s less and less because people don’t see the clear delineation between their work-life in their home life. Especially with technology. Yeah, especially right. Right. That’s that has changed. So much of our work-life is interwoven. In-kind personal. Okay, um, any, uh, any, like, special or, uh, types of events that you like to see or something fun that maybe people haven’t thought of it. We could all go out for drinks. You know, maybe it’s a bowling night, right? pizza on Fridays. You got something something special beyond the humdrum stuff that I just named. Sure, I think what’s important is to actually give your employees ownership over this. So what I’ve done in some of my past work places is to create. And they called themselves the fund committee. Um, but to create that committee and actually allow the employees to decide what they want to do with that time and if you can throw a little budget at it Wonderful. But also again coming from non-profit. Ah, one of the places that I worked with. We just did not have the budget for that. You know, we’re very Grant restricted and and we weren’t gonna get that that fund money. So what we decided to do instead is we worked with our controller, and we all decided to deduct $2 each paycheck to go into a fund committee fund because we wanted to get to know each other better. We wanted to have teamed building on, and it’s completely optional. And it’s a knot of, you know, we don’t send out the list to say, Hey, so and so is not in the fun committee. Um but, you know, allow that and then allow them to decide what it looks like with your approval to make sure that you’re not having an HR nightmare or you’re not, You know, misusing funds or anything like that. But let them have ownership. Let them decide, Let them tell you. Okay, okay. To try to ah, tryto resuscitate myself or laser tag. Laser tag. Could you do that? That’s not humdrum. I lovely attack. Yeah, Yeah. Um uh, Anything else you want to say about motivation? You know, I I think what’s important And this is something that I think we’re actually relatively good at in the nonprofit world, but is important to come back to We have to come back to our mission and we have to come back to our why on a regular basis. It’s really easy when we air show stressed with multiple grants and funding streams. And what not to get caught up in the numbers and your team? What they hear when they just hear numbers, numbers, numbers is that you’ve lost touch with the client. You’ve lost touch with the families. You’ve lost touch with the communities that we serve. So making sure that you’re bringing yourself back, but also as a team that you’re spending time to really reflect on how you are serving your miss mission, which is most of the reason why. Probably your team works for you right now. Bring it back to the mission. Yes. Frequent, I think. Frequent visits to the mission. Yeah, certainly in terms of new programs or new ideas that are bubbling because this is going to be a collaborative, contributing team, and they’re gonna have ideas, you know? Do they? That may be a great idea, but does it work within what were charged to do? Okay. All right. So we’re talking about a lot about meetings. I’m guessing you have some tips on running effective meetings. Efficient, productive. Happy meetings. Yes. Okay, let’s start with something that’s old friends of mine or the technology. Like the technology rules for meetings our phones allowed. Do you need Oh, my gosh. We only have two minutes left. Okay, uh, let’s do justice to tech rules for meetings. Okay? So I actually, I’m a millennial, so I am guilty of having all of my technology in the room when I’m doing meetings, but at the end of the day, as I’ve worked with people from different generations and different values as well. It doesn’t even have to be a generational thing. Those who do not allow technology in the meeting room, they have been much more productive. And it pains me as a millennial to say that, but it is absolutely true. Leave your laptop back there, leave your phone in your office because you’re their toe work together. And everyone in your meeting should have a reason that they’re there. They should be someone who is contributing to the meeting. Otherwise, they shouldn’t be invited, Um, or made to sit through something. So put the phones away and focus on what you’ve got there and use that collaborative creativity. Okay, Um, now I’ve heard there could be an exception. You know, uh, my my pet is in surgery for my son is in surgery or my dad is in surgery. No. So that could be exceptions for those you know, those kinds of cases, right? I see that. But also that is a weekly, a slippery slope. So here’s what I say. Yes, there are always emergencies, but let someone know for the next hour, they need to call the front office. Then they need to call this phone line. And if there is an actual emergency, your receptionist, your office manager will come in and get you. But if you’re talking about in an emergency, then you pick up that phone every five seconds to check it, and you’re getting out of the flow of that collaboration, okay? And then there’s also the slippery slope, you know? Well, she had her son, but I don’t have children, but I have a cat cats in surgery. My cat is just like a child to me. Exactly. It’s not right. All right. Next to becomes a pet spider than the turtle, you know, gets ridiculous. All right, All right, Nikki. Henry, we gotta leave it there. All right? Thank you, Tony. My pleasure. She’s the founder and CEO of Ladies Leading Ladies. You’ll find her at ladies. Underscore leading underscore and the lady’s leading ladies dot com. It’s time to take a break. Yes, it is. Indeed. Uh, Wagner, C p A’s. They’ve got a free webinar on August 6th. Developing high impact grants. Improve your grants, research and writing. You’ll find it at Wagner cps dot com. Click Resource Is and upcoming events. If you miss it live, then watch the archive. Wagner cps dot com Quick Resource is and recorded events makes perfect sense. Did I mess something up here? Pardon me? Yeah, but, uh, but I didn’t do Wagner. I’m I I did already. No, I didn’t. I think you messed me up. I’m blaming it on Sam because I don’t have any interns. If I have an intern, I’ve blamed the answer we need in turns into show. So I have somebody to blame when there’s a screw up. Like right now, I don’t have one, but it’s certainly not my fault. It couldn’t be so. It’s just that that’s outside the realm of its Not it’s inconceivable, and I don’t mean inconceivable, like uh, like they using conceivable in the Princess Bride. I mean, it is inconceivable, so it must be Sam’s fault. Thea Other thing. The other sponsor that we need to talk about is Cougar Mountain software. Maintaining separate accounts for each fund Ain’t a ning daily expenses reporting to the board, these air or all challenges that you face. That’s why Cougar Mountain created Denali Fund It’s your complete accounting solution specifically designed for non-profits. They have a 60 day free trial. You’ll find that at tony dot m a slash Cougar Mountain. Now it’s time for Tony’s Take two. I’m positive. Sam screwed me up here. I know he did. You left out a break. Okay, the, uh, 450th chauffeur non-profit radio. It’s next. Next week, For God’s sake, It’s July 26th. 2019 is coming up. What’s coming up on the two on the 450th show? Ninth anniversary. Been at this for nine years. 2010 giveaways. We’ve got your coffee giveaways, Of course. Kira is the coffee company that supports coffee growers and workers through providing dental care in the dental care like my voice was crackly. I’m 14. That’s how excited I get back your coffee. They provide dental care because the president of the company, the founder, is a dentist, but they provide dental care to coffee bead growers and workers. As you buy their coffee, you’re supporting that work that we’ve got giveaways from Cure a coffee. I’ll probably go away. Some books from the library, the non-profit Video Library where authors have given me multiple copies of books and What I’ve Got. Live music. Scott Stein, of course. Scott Stein from Brooklyn, who plays are, will play our theme song Complete Cheap Red Wine You Played Completely Through. And then, of course, we’ll count on him to play another song as well. And he’ll be here with this keyboard. Clear Myer. Half our creative producer is gonna be in town. Um, we got all the regular contributors calling in Aimee Semple Ward, Jean Takagi and, of course, Maria Semple. They’ll all call in. We’re welcoming new sponsors. You have heard a couple of shows with them already, but we’re going to formally welcome Cougar Mountain and turn to Communications as our new sponsor. So there’s a shitload going on. Um, and I can say that because my show what I could do, whatever the hell I want. You don’t like it? You’re not gonna stop listening. I mean, well, I mean, you could, but the odds of you doing it just cause I said shit one time so small, it’s it’s inconceivable. So there’s a shitload going on. Be with us for July 26 next week, the 450th show. There’s more on my video out. Could you imagine I could be any more to say on this topic, but watch the video anyway. The video is that tony martignetti dot com and I recorded it in my car. So Zwart watching for that reason since that makes. But let’s do the live listen to love. Ah, there’s a ton of it. Oh, yes, Sam the noisy eh commission. I think that Sam is really screwing up today. You forgot to turn the air conditioner off with my mike. Went live. Now you hear it. See how much quieter is now? That’s because there’s no air conditioning. You heard the buzz. You didn’t know what it was that you really all right. I’m not paying for this week’s show, All right? The live. Listen, love. Where the hell is it? We got listeners in. At least we had. We may have just left in the past three minutes, but we had a few minutes ago. Listeners in Rochester, New York, Tampa, Florida Irving, Texas Washington, D. C. Newburgh New broke New York. I love that straight up, right up the Hudson River. A little bit not upstate New Yorkers. New York City but I don’t live here anymore, so I don’t consider it upstate. Newberg. Welcome. Live love to you. Multiple New York, New York. Um, where else we got? Seoul, South Korea. Loved one soul checks in annual haserot comes a ham Nida Tokyo is with us very loyal. Also very loyal listeners in Tokyo Konnichi wa Beijing Beijing is with us equally loyal Ni hao to our Beijing listeners live love there. Moscow, Russia. That’s a pretty frequent Dublin Ireland. Not sure you’ve been with us before. Um, welcome. I’ve love to Ah, to Dublin. Um And there’s another sheet I left out a whole bunch of sheet coming back here. Alexandria, Virginia. We got listeners live love there, but then going abroad again. Oh, another South Korea yon yon gene or young in South Korea. Also on your haserot Too young Jean Athens, Greece. Welcome. I think that’s new. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Live love to you and Afghanistan. Herat, Afghanistan. I know. That’s first time. I’m so glad you’re with us. Afghanistan. Live love to you and the podcast Pleasantries. They got to go out because it’s over 13,000. You know eso whatever time zone you are, in whatever device you’re listening on pleasantries to you. I’m grateful that you’re with us. I’m grateful the show continues to grow. Uh, I can’t say Week after week grows every single week, but month after month year, the trending is up. So it’s all good. That’s that’s very positive. Pleasantries toe our podcast, listeners all right after that raving ranting. It’s ridiculous. I’m not. Whitney Raver should probably hung up. She was on the phone. If she’s still with us, she’s our next guest on, and I’m pleased to welcome her, Assuming she’s with me. She is the founder and chief development strategist at What’s the word? That’s a growth acceleration agency focused on amplifying non-profit impact. She teaches how to use stories to build trust and raving loyalty among donors. I’m starting to ratchet it down now. I have to have a conversation with Whitney, for God’s sake, get piela linked a woman she and the company are both at What’s the world inc dot com and at oh, what I said, No, that’s not it. It’s what’s the word? Inc dot com? Pardon me, What’s the word? Inc dot com and at what’s the word Inc Welcome to the show. Whitney River. Are you still there? I am here. Who could leave that performance? I can think of a lot of people. My mom for number one and my dad, but they don’t listen to begin with. So that turned them off years ago. Um, welcome. It’s good to have you. You are calling from the Black hills of South Dakota. That’s awesome. That’s way West. You got Mount Rushmore, Badlands National Park. That’s a beautiful part of our country. Yeah. Oh, I love it. I’m 20 minutes away from the most beautiful national mom in the world. And of course, I live smack dab in the middle of four. So I’m surrounded by the most beautiful hills in the world, I think, but at least you might be biased. Like, you know, New Yorkers think it’s the center of the world. But you deserve to think highly of the black hills. So, um what? So you have what are some of the monuments there that you have? So we have not rushmore. That’s about 20 minutes away from my house. We have, like, he said, Badlands. The Black Hills are a national monument, and then we have. My personal favorite is the crazy Horse Memorial has been works there and their longtime friends of his family, and it’s just up. They’re carving a giant mountain buy-in into, you know, putting over the Black Hills. And it’s just incredible to see they’re carving the carving crazy horse into the side of a mountain like Mount Rushmore into hyre Mountain. It’ll be, um, 3 60 It’ll be an entire mountain, not just one face of it. So Mount Rushmore will be will be minimal. Minimize is minimal compared to this 360 degrees. What kind of project? How long does that latto many years? Does that take? Oh, it’s you know, they’re expecting It’ll be done in about 60 years the last time I checked. Plus, they’re also very because they’ve gotten a few new drill and technology has come along. The founder cortex Socolovsky was carrying his jack up the mountain and doing it by hand. It may take 60 years. You cut out a little bit there, but 60 years, you’re incredibly patient in South Dakota, you have to finish that thing in like, 20 minutes. Here in New York, we just start trampling on it or somebody would steal it or Or graffiti it, Uh, maybe 1/2 an hour. Give it. But 60 years. Damn, you have. Um I have a lot of patients I also love. You know, you have that enormous space, South Dakota. And there’s about 800,000 people who live there. Brittney, did you turn me off? Oh, we didn’t turn you off. Okay, You have 100,000 people. I mean, we have We have 8,000,000 in a little island here. Uh, I don’t know what the dimensions are, but it’s got to be, like 1 10/1000 the size of South Dakota. And we have 8,000,000 8 and 1/2 about 9,000,000 or something like that. You have 800,000 in the whole freakin state. That’s incredible. It’s another person. Yeah. Yeah, well, you’re surrounded by a forest. All right. Um, okay, enough geography, but thank you. We never had having had a call from South Dakota. Our guest from South Dakota. So, um, so, uh, this topic of failures little personal for you because you ran for the for the South Dakota House of Representatives. As did it. It didn’t go so Well. Well, yes. No. And we can absolutely talk about way. Are we talking about it right now? What do you mean? We can We are. We’re doing it. Let’s start no more about it than I do so well in that I did not win. Um, I mean, ballots were cast, and I end up going to appear, which, you know, broke my heart. But I did my job. I served three and gave my neighbors a choice. Okay, but what I feel really right was, um, in speeches and to be going in and e-giving a perspective, an opportunity to think of things in a way that they have never Ben exposed to before had just results. And I tell you what, I got dozens of phone calls, and in the days and weeks after that election from people who just said, Gosh, I just wish I had voted for you. What? Why didn’t he? Hey, so if I do it again, it might be a whole new conversation. Okay, but what came out of that, uh, that, uh I had to say that failure, That that lack of success I don’t know. I mean, we could use the word failure. The cell, The second is about failure. Look what came out of that. Would you learn from that failure that informs your your, uh, don’t fear your failure practice really? That people have to be spoken to. You know, I feel like it was closer to my community that the constituents in this district actually trusted. Or after after I had failed and gone back into them and and, you know, um, we’re we’re still in this together. You can still count on me saying that I have had promised Call me email me. Here’s my social media and where no one really did before while I was right, I still get plenty tons of e mails and phone calls all the time. You know, we need a brave voice for this issue. Would you mind keeping us in this capacity? So even though I failed, I think that because I was so open with it and because I was so accepting of it, I really have done a lot more to earn the trust of my community, simply running an offering to take that position. Okay, Awesome. And, uh, we’re gonna go take our first break. And when we come back, that’s a perfect transition. Cause you want, um, you want non-profits toe earn The trust of folks are well, we’ll continue with that. After we take this very short break Turn to communications, PR and content for your non-profit. They help you tell your compelling stories and get media attention on those stories and help you build support, media relations, content, marketing, communications and marketing strategy and branding strategy. This is all of what turned to does. They’re at turn hyphen to DOT CEO. I’ve got butt loads, more time for the power of failure and Whitney River Whitney. So what is this trust That, uh, I mean, it’s I think it’s implicit buy-in non-profit relationships, but we want to talk about it explicitly, asking for trust and building trust. How do you feel that sharing your failures helps? Helps that I want nick down the importance of trust non-profits all over staying a decline in donorsearch ship and e-giving, and it’s really it’s their capacity for impact. And one of the reasons for that is because you were then 20% of potential donors trust organization, and there is a wide range of reasons for that. We as non-profits and as impact creators view the world is it could be has to do a better job of not just vacating our vision but bringing people in on that vision. And that requires a more three dimensional story, um, or hope, view of our And that includes sharing her, sharing our failures. Yeah, um, listeners, I know that Whitney is cutting out a little bit. It’s it’s something in the phone. But we’re pretty sure that if even if she calls back, it’s not gonna make a difference of Whitney. I may ask like I’m a repeat. Something that I I think you’ve said or I asked you to repeat something. Okay, because you’re cutting out a little bit. I think it may help, though, if you speak louder. Okay. Okay. Um, all right. So yeah. I mean, this is this is, uh, consistent with what we know about personal relationships, right? I mean, if to build trust with I don’t know, a spouse, a friend, you know, you you share and and just over time, I mean, you don’t want to share the good things that you share. What’s what’s happening in your life, and it’s not all good. And over time that the people you’re sharing with feel that they’ve been brought into your you brought them into your confidence. Great. You pick each other up and buy a shared your failures and kind of throwing your bungles out there. You give your community a chance, your hero. You tend to take it as a non-profit, the place of the hero in the grand story. And if you read Donald Miller Story brand, you know that Really, Um the odd wants to be the hero. And by sharing your failures and giving them a chance t and help you as part of you, you really give them the opportunity to the hero in that story. And that’s one of the ways you you gain trust and and buy-in. Okay, I’m not clear on something. Uh, making someone the hero of the story could flush that abila more sure to be sure to talk. So, as a nonprofit organization, you you tend to be the hero in the grand scheme of your vision. You are connecting and volunteers to your beneficiaries to serve your mission and the role of donor or volunteers can’t sometimes be inadequately highlighted. The people who stand on the sidelines wondering whether or not they should get of their time or their money are there. They’re looking for some reprieve and by giving them an opportunity to serve you first as xero. So to speak, in the story outline of communication, you give them the opportunity to feel like they’re really important to you and therefore to the mission. Okay, so making your donors and volunteers and Central Central to the story. Great. Okay. Okay. Um, have you seen this? Ah, have you seen examples of this? Any stories you can share that you think I’ve been done? Well, certainly. We’ll tell you about the startup that we’re working with right now. It’s high altitude training. And these these books have an incredible mission. It’s a group of elite long distance athletes who have together to show how sustainable living is the road, who meeting our highest human potential. And they they’re promoting sustainable living practices and agriculture and energy, and they’re using their competition to show to build a community around these ideas. Obviously, as an athlete, you can’t show up and take every time every time you raised rape. Yeah, So we have to make sure that our community and we’re building a wide, um, community of donor sponsors, volunteer participants. That community needs to be with us, and you stand that, You know, we may come in 10 but that is not any less important to our mission. We have to be able to show them how every every failure, every pore, placement, every station is an opportunity to refine our actions and refined and learn more about the lifestyle that we’re trying eat and how to become better at it on dhe. How do they do? They or generally are you recommending, you know, like coming out, right? Like asking for trust Or this is just something that you build implicitly. You know, Bo, what’s it? For the most part, I’ll go back to Tiu Thio, you know, shit. Like my marriage, for instance, my husband and I just celebrated 12 years, and, um, when we when we first started dating, I adamantly against marriage or any, you know, major commitment. Because I didn’t have that kind of trust. And I think a lot of people can relate to that over time. You, you you you work other, you fail together, you grow together and you realize that we’re We’re in this together. You’re important. I’m important. We have to come together to to serve the school. Did you? Yeah. It does make sense. Um, you start by by by sharing. You start by moving it. Build enough of a background you do You turn to them and ask them. Trust me. Don’t need volunteer. Give speak. But in order to make that request valid, you want to spend your time building that relationship and half of half of it is testing. The other half is failure. Yeah, well, it doesn’t have to be 50 50. I mean, you could we could be a little more optimistic. Make it like 60 40 right? Failure, success to failure. And let s oblique is just, like half, but, you know, out there in South Dakota, please, Ideally, it doesn’t come up very often, but when it does, you know you don’t want to You don’t be the ones behind behind the eight ball, you know you want you want to get well, for instance, you know, this is kind of a political topic, but the, um, fiasco in Florida with the Florida charity. Um, they were in a position to receive a station from a questionable fund raiser. Um, you know, as soon as it hit the public act out and there there were two ways to go about handled situation and positioning yourself in that situation. And when we when we come up against, um, situations like that very, You know, 1/3 party may not a lot or best interest in mind, but their actions may not align with our mission. Our vic gold. We take a stand, and instead of receding into the you want to stand up and explain, you know where you are in the story, how you responded, how your response reflect on mission in values and division so that that story isn’t written by someone else. What about selecting the right failures to talk about? I can envision some that you shouldn’t, but let’s let’s put aside the ones that are that are public, and then, you know you have to you have to share. But, uh, you know, there’s some things that you might be a might be a bad hyre or something. I mean, what what types of failures. Would we include or not? Include? Okay, So, like you said some just public And you know, if it’s if it’s going to take off in the media, you definitely want to get that. Yeah, of course. But others include white fun galas. Think things like that where maybe you don’t have the amount that you were hoping for. Yeah, you know, a lot of organizations. What they’ll do is they’ll take their attendees and squeeze them into a little ball and take a picture to make it look like they’re 100. And they’ll put that story out and, you know, talk about the great turn and everything that was accomplished. But we still need you to donate really hard on trust. The messaging doesn’t align. Whether or not your audience really puts the time into unraveling that they know they know that there’s something off and that hurts their trust. What would How would you message it instead? Um, I would mess. It’s typically about like, uh, on event. I was humorously like, Wow, we really bumbled that one. We scheduled this during this other events. Too bad we’re not that popular, you know. But since that we need you guys to show up in this capacity instead. Okay? And you feel like this is something, by the way, we just have about two minutes left. You feel like this is a way, a way to move forward in 2019 and ahead. You see this as an important future trend or current trend and just increasing Absolutely Whether or not, um, the Internet and having you know, all of the station of ages in the pub wolber hand has forced us to be transparent as a non-profit. You are complete both. So you might as well work with that to build a station ship run with it. There are great organizations like charity. My gosh, I’m so gaga over charity water. I’ve never seen such such bold. And I mean almost surreal transparency. And that’s that’s the standard that donors want and need to see any. Yeah. Um, yeah, there’s a video I remember seeing charity water scum. Scott Harrison. The CEO is standing in front of a well that failed in. They do their work in Africa. I don’t remember what countries in but the well collapsed and he said, We’ll be back. We’ll be back And I’m sure I’m sure he sure they did go back. Um Okay. Whitney River. We’re gonna leave it there. Thank you very much. My pleasure. Thank you. You’re welcome. It’s a founder and chief development strategist at what’s the word? What’s the word? Inc dot com and at what’s the word Inc. Next week you heard all about it. It’s the 4 50 If if you don’t. If you don’t remember what next week’s show was about, you need to tune out. If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com actually already turned out. If you don’t, if you don’t know what the 4 50 it is, you’re already out. Responsive by Wagner, c. P A. Is guiding you beyond the numbers. Witnessed gps dot com by Cougar Mountain Software Denali fundez. They’re complete accounting solution made for tony dot m a slash Cougar Mountain for a free 60 day trial and by turned to communications, PR and content for non-profits, your story is their mission. Turn hyphen to dot CEO. Our creative producers Claire Meyer off. She’ll be in the studio next week. Sam Liebowitz is the line producer is screwed up today. Social shows, Social media is by Susan Chavez. She’s safe. She’s out in California. No guilt there. Mark Silverman is our Web guy. He’s fine. And this music is by Scott Stein, who will also be in the studio next week. You’re with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other 95% complete. Turn the air conditioning on. It’s sweltering in here. Go out and be great. You’re listening to the talking alternate network. You’re listening to the Talking Alternative network. Are you stuck in a rut? Negative thoughts, feelings and conversations got you down. Hi, I’m nor in Sumpter potentially ater. Tune in every Tuesday at 9 to 10 p.m. Eastern time and listen for new ideas on my show. Beyond potential. Live Life, Your Way on talk radio dot N Y C on the aptly named host of Tony martignetti non-profit Radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other 95% fund-raising board relations, social media. My guests and I cover everything that small and midsize shops struggle with. If you have big dreams and the small budget, you have a home at Tony martignetti non-profit Radio. Friday’s 1 to 2 Eastern at talking alternative dot com Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business. Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested? Simply email at info at talking alternative dot com Are you a conscious co creator? Are you on a quest to raise your vibration and your consciousness? Sam Liebowitz, your conscious consultant and on my show, the conscious consultant, our awakening humanity. We will touch upon all these topics and more. Listen live at our new time on Thursdays at 12 noon Eastern time. That’s the conscious consultant. Our Weakening Humanity. Thursday’s 12 noon on talk radio dot You’re listening to Talking Alternative Network at www dot talking alternative dot com now broadcasting 24 hours a day. Do you love or are you intrigued about New York City and its neighborhoods? I’m Jeff Goodman, host of Rediscovering New York Weekly showed that showcases New York’s history, and it’s extraordinary neighborhoods. Every Tuesday live at 7 p.m. We focus on a particular neighborhood and explore its history. It’s vibe, it’s feel and its energy tune and live every Tuesday at 7 p.m. On talk radio dahna, you’re listening to the Talking Alternative network

327: Don’t Burn Out in 2017 & Personalized Video – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Paul Loeb, author of the books “Soul Of a Citizen” and “The Impossible Will Take a Little While.”

Also, Michael Hoffman, CEO of See3 Communications and Jono Smith, director of brand marketing and digital strategy, Make-A-Wish America.

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com

051: CEO as Fundraising MVP – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Two chief executives, Mindy Duitz at Learning Leaders and Karen Pearl at God’s Love We Deliver, reveal their insights on how to motivate, engage and position your CEO to be a fundraising MVP.

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://mpgadv.com

View Full Transcript
Transcript for 051_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_07222011.mp3

Processed on: 2018-11-11T22:44:41.530Z
S3 bucket containing transcription results: transcript.results
Link to bucket: s3.console.aws.amazon.com/s3/buckets/transcript.results
Path to JSON: 2011…07…051_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_07222011.mp3.912926059.json
Path to text: transcripts/2011/07/051_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_07222011.txt

Hello and welcome to the show. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio. I’m your aptly named host it’s friday, july twenty second, two thousand eleven we’re always talking about big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I hope you were with me last week when we had cool collaborations and intelligently engaging generations x and y first, sandra lam and i talked about mergers, partnerships, collaborations and acquisitions. When should your board be talking about thes, and how do you execute them? Later? We had leslie goldman and casey rotter from the us fund for unicef, sharing their expertise in cultivating your next generation of donors, engaging twenty one to forty year olds this week, i have two interviews again from fund-raising day, the association of fund-raising professionals conference in new york city, which was this past june first, the ceo as fund-raising m v p for those of you who don’t know baseball that’s most valuable player like me, i had to look that up. Mindy dietz and karen pearl, they’re both non-profit chief executives, and they reveal their insights on how to motivate, engage and position your ceo to be a fund-raising m v p and i assume you know what ceo stands for, then the fine art of conversation, of conversion, the fine art of conversion don’t be afraid of analytics tools like google analytics can help you convert website visitors into online donors and help you engage younger prospects who later become donors. My guest is scott barnett and he’s, the director of web communications for fairfield university. In between those two interviews, of course it’s tony’s, take two this month is our one year anniversary. All this month celebrating, we’ve got two new regular contributors in law and prospect research joining me actually two contributors in law starting later this month and then a contributor in prospect research starting in august. I’ll talk about those and i was on tv this week. We’ve consumer reporter esa aaron’s, we were talking about the irs revocation of tax exempt status list. Ah, and i also did a bit of stand up comedy this week, so tony’s take two, maybe more like tony’s take three or four, but it’ll definitely be around thirty two minutes into the hour and that will all be on tony’s take two right now we take a break and then when we come back the ceo as fund-raising m v p hyre you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Duitz are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three that’s two one two, seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey, sick. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set to one, two, nine six four three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom two, one two, nine, six, four, three five zero two. We make people happy. Dahna hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven with the new york city marriott marquis in times square. My guest now are mindy dietz, president of learning leaders, and karen pearl, president and ceo of god’s love we deliver, ladies welcome great to be here. Thank you very much. Pleasure to have you your fund-raising topic you’re fund-raising seminar topic is the ceo as fund-raising m v p now, just a couple of minutes ago, i was talking to three, three people, three guests, about motivating they’re bored to cultivate major gifts, and we’ll talk about that bored relationship with the ceo. But, karen, what? What are the key elements of the ceo as fund-raising most valuable player? I would say that the key element is that so many of our donors actually want to meet the ceo, get to know the ceo. And so the there’s a partnership between the board, the ceo and the development team to make sure that the ceo knows who they’re about to meet, what they’re going to talk about and is ready because if the ceo is ready, that’s the best leverage that you khun get okay, ready? And willing, ready and willing. Okay, maybe we’ll talk about the unwilling ceo back-up. I’m sorry, leslie, why don’t you? What would you like, tio? Sort of sorry, mindy. Mindy, what would you like to open with around the ceo as most valuable player for fund-raising? Well, i i would echo what karen just said, and i think the key to all of fund-raising and all of these things is relationships that i think that the ceo has to be the person who manages up the person who manages down from donors to board and really forms i kind of ahh whole chain of people having faith in each other because people do invest in people as well as organization. And so i was really primarily i think, who we all are and who we represent in terms of the organizations and mindy, how does the ceo sort of set the culture of fund-raising for the rest of the organization, we’ll we’ll be talking about their individual role with respect directly with donors, but how did they set a culture of fund-raising throughout the organization for the others? I think we, you know, we all know what they have to explain that every single member of staff and every boardmember absolutely are part of the fund-raising team, we’re all selling something we don’t like to maybe use that terminology, but we are the spokespeople where the practitioners where the deliverers and we have to care and we have to have passion and i think what distinguishes all of us as non-profits is the passion for what we do and that’s what makes us able and all be part of fund-raising but what is the ceo need to do? Teo teo, race everybody else well, we need to be the chief cheerleader. We need to be the person who keeps reminding everyone about the value of the work. I mean, what we really selling is something very important depending on the mission of our organization. So i think the ceo really has to be the person who could articulate it and also inspire people to go out and help sell it. And karen, as we just mentioned a second ago, i said, you know, willingness there has to be that willingness in order for the c e o to convey the same enthusiasm to the rest of the organization without question. And the ceo has to be willing and i what we talk a lot. About it, god’s love we deliver is that each of us has a very special role as an ambassador, and it doesn’t matter whether we’re being the ambassador directly with clients. The ambassador with our volunteers, ambassador with our donors, but way worked very hard to make sure that all of our staff are prepared to to play that role, to know enough about god’s love some key talking points to be able to talk the sunday dinner with family or at the ball field sitting with their friends, and i think that does come very much from the leadership if the leadership of the organization is comfortable fund-raising and helps people understand there very special role in that that filters down into the culture and people really enjoy it. They really like it. Some of us are staff for some of our best fundraisers. Is it possible, karin, for youto say, how much of your time is devoted to fund-raising some ceos will say one hundred percent right it’s, not a hundred percent. Everything i do is really fund-raising you know yes, you could say that, but i think the heart of your question is how often am i? Actually, either meeting with the development team meeting with the board meeting with donors on i would say that’s probably half of my time. Okay, okay. Mindy, do you have advice for boards as they’re hiring a ceo around, making sure that they get a ceo who’s able and willing to do all the things that you you described earlier and be that passionate fundraiser? I mean, the single most important thing that a board of any organization does is hyre their ceo and it’s got to be a fit, and that sounds kind of trite, but it has to be fit with them because in a way, they’re looking for someone to champion their cause and give them direction. I mean, the ceo is not the chairman of the board, but has to be with the chairman, a leader and a partner. So i think the hiring is really about looking for a match and there’s no one definition of that it’s got to be the culture of the organization, the goals of the organization, the level the organization is at, you know, a startup is looking for one kind of person. A very established organization looks for different. Level so it’s, knowing where you’re at, the board needs to know where the organizations that and what’s the match for that level, you know, i don’t want to pursue this little bit more about the hiring of the ceo. Do you like to see people within the organization interviewing potential ceo candidates? You mean, like the staff? Yeah, i think it is absolutely the board’s decision. I don’t think the board should ask the permission of the staff. Frankly, i think a smart candidate will ask to meet the key staff to see who they are to see what they’re saying. And so i think it’s an important thing, to have an interaction and to get a real feel so that, you know the ceo themselves has a taste of what the organization is and can even turn to the board and say, well, this is what i see, and perhaps the culture needs to go one way or the other. And are you going to be with me on that? E-giving didn’t think the tubing getting ding, ding, ding ding you’re listening to the talking alternative network to get you thinking duitz things cubine are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Oppcoll are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed hi and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com looking to meet mr and mrs wright, but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your car relationship as fulfilling as possible? Then please join us, starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with morning alison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Please tune in and call as we discuss dating relationship and more. Start your week off with love in the morning with marnie alison on talking alternative dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Karen earlier you suggested about thie i just forgot what i was going to ask you about the willingness of the ceo. Now we’ll have to skip that because when i come back, then i think the question about hiring the ceo, the one of the thing that i would say is that when boards goto hyre ceo, they themselves are the in some ways the organization’s key donors, and they can very quickly judged by their own reaction whether they think the person who’s sitting in front of them has vision, has passion, can communicate it because what they’re seeing in that interview process is what donors will say. Of course, in an interview, you’re not going to know the organization as well, or and there will be a learning curve, but bored should put themselves not only in the role of the governance leader, but also in the role of the of the donor and say, is this somebody who i see is the face of this organization, who i feel comfortable putting out there, you might be happy being the front person, you know what i was going to ask you is you had alluded to donors. Wanting to see the ceo now, how do you manage over exposure so that the ceo, i don’t think, shouldn’t be brought in for every obviously for every donor meeting? How do you decide when it’s appropriate and for which donors? The meeting for the ceo is right? I’m we’re time not an issue. I would say that your premise that the ceo should be brought in for every donor is not so because i do think that every donor is entitled to know the organization and know the leadership time sometimes is an issue, so what we do it god’s love is that we do some combination of donors, meetings that are one on one and other other donor meetings that might be a group of people who come in. So we’re now in a siri’s of coffee with the ceo so i can sit and talk with a number of people at the same time, so we try very hard to be as connected and not just connected to me, though that’s. The other key is that they want to meet the ceo, but the ceo doesn’t have to be there only relationship with the organization there are board members, there are other donors, their staff, particularly the development staff, and we share that, yeah, that’s going to play at all levels. There should be no donor who only knows one member of the staff, right, including those including those people who are receiving your services. Don’t you want to broaden no, the knowledge base of the the recipients, right, right. We’re benefitting right? Well, mostly what we care about, because that god’s love we’re dealing with people who are really sick, and so when they need to connect with us, we want them to make that connection. We don’t want them tow. Have tio hang on the phone for a long time, get a call back they could be napping by the call comes back, so for us, it’s, like call anybody. We have a lot of general numbers so that people can. Our clients can get to us really without fuss. Karen what’s, the part of fund-raising that you dislike the most. I don’t know there isn’t really one that i just i guess the thing that i had to think about, that what nobody’s ever done it good like like, well, mindy, what do you see in your in your practice? The part that ceos perhaps struggle with the most? I think, you know, like carrot it’s so integral to the job you don’t think about liking it or not like it. I think sometimes is a part of me that just takes a deep breath and says all the energy and all the time and money that goes into raising money. There are moments when you wish you could be using that more to be delivered your service, but it’s kind of integral to the work, and it is rewarding because it’s europe opportunity to have people invested in what you’re doing. But is there something that you see ceo struggle with more than than others are maybe it’s identifying or speaking in large groups or meeting in individual meetings? I think the nature of being a ceo is that you need to be comfortable with all of those modes, and what might be a struggle is if it’s really not you. If it’s not, you’re fit, you could be quiet at it. You could be loud at it. You could be exuberant. You could have your own style. Think i think for all work. It’s got to be a match. Okay, i’m with mindy dietz, president of learning leaders, and karen pearl, president and ceo of god’s love we deliver and you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven let’s talk about the relationship with the board. The board is integral fund-raising integral member of the fund-raising team as a whole and then also as individuals. Um, karen, how do you manage that relationship with your board? As as fundraisers? It’s a really key part, i think of the ceo’s job is managing the relationship with the boards that you say as individuals and as a group, as a collective and of getting finding the right way to engage each boardmember because each has their own skills, abilities, willingness and comfort level comfort, you know, so some people are, like, great, you know, getting in there with you making an ask of somebody another one might say i’m really not comfortable with that. But i will send a letter and another might say, i’m more willing tohave people come to events with me or to buy a table or do other things. Some people are fantastic spokespeople, and they don’t really want to do fund-raising so i think a riel art is getting the best of each of your board members and as a collective getting the skill set that you need to really advance the organization in fund-raising sing, but in lots of different areas, and how do you assess what each board members strengths and weaknesses are? Is there some kind of formal assessment, or is it really just you getting to know them and understanding that way? That process starts way back in the recruitment process for new board members in terms of why’re they being recommended, what is their formal resume? And then what is there in formal resume? Because a lot of people have skills that, like, they might be a coach and if somebody’s a coach on the side that speaks to how they might work in a group on your board so it’s getting to know them through the recruitment process and then ultimately spending some time with board members, once they’re on the board to talk about that and to nurture them, we have somebody in our board right now who promised us he would never do an ounce of fund-raising and he’s now like out there, getting his friends involved, calling people asking that takes time, and so where they start may not be where they end up after your two of service mini. And in your practice, do you use much formal assessment of board members, may be assessing each other or certainly at least themselves. I’ve had experiences with both. I think it’s actually very healthy to do formal assessment, but it depends again at the point, the board is that where the organization is that in i said in the beginning of this conversation that all this is about relationships and managing them. And i think boards need to self assess. And i need to say how we doing and how’s our mix and what is it we need more of? And that could be that’s sometimes good to do formally. Maybe they need a workshop. Maybe there are those people who want to practice. Most importantly, it’s a one on one relationship to building their strengths and the formality, i think, just gets the conversation started. What about the training of board members for fund-raising that i’m imagine that probie starts in the recruitment process, also setting expectation, but let’s talk generally about the think that its friends, whether it’s a new boardmember who’s never been ever a boardmember or a very experienced one. You know, some people come to you with a lot already, i’ve we often have formal training sessions that there’s a campaign we’re going to meet. We’re going over the goals and even role playing so it could be very formal and specific or coming to conferences like this. Conferences are a great way to bring a boardmember into a professional setting to realize they’re connected to a much broader world. It’s, not just their organization, that there’s resource is that it also inspires that they feel very proud. You know? Karen looked like you were nodding and suggesting you want to say something around setting the board members expectations at the recruitment stage around fund-raising i think it’s very important to do that very important before you as you offering them aboard position to make. Sure, they understand that, and then to keep working and doing training and four every time you ask a boardmember to help is another opportunity to advance what they know in their comfort level. So something is simple. One of the things we’re about to have a big fund-raising about van next saturday night, and our board members will have the names of two people we really want them to connect with and a little cheat sheet that’ll fit like in their shirt pocket that has the two or three things we really want them to talk about with that person, so they feel like when they come over and they say hi, tony, i hope you’re having a good time tonight that if the person’s not really chatty, they know what to follow up with, and that gives him a great comfort level. And again, they become fantastic ambassadors because in a party, we’re not asking them to fundraise per se, we’re asking them to friend race that’s a great example, i think, of giving ah boardmember overy manageable goal at the meet at this is large event we’d like you to meet these two people. That’s, right? No. That’s, right? And then we set up staff to make sure that the staff is on the lookout for those two people. And that one boardmember to make sure that they find each other right there where they can feel successful. It’s one thing to get a gift, get a grant, but there’s so many steps along the way and giving very specific direction and, you know, something like a real job at this event, it just makes people feel really good. You know, mindy, how do you like to see ceos prepare for a meeting with a donor? Doesn’t necessarily have to be a solicitation. Could be. But how do you like to see them prepare for meeting with a major donor? Well, i always like to be fully briefed by my development staff. Or it might be a boardmember who knows this donor’s? Well, i like to know everything. I like to know their professional background. Other organizations were involved with kind of a nice profile research. And then we like we sit. I like to talk to a couple of people. The organization think. Well, given this person’s background, you know how? What are the parts of? Our organization or work that we think of the strongest and just really go in briefed and at the same time be wide open to going in another direction because you really don’t know and people start talking what you’re going. I’ve gone in thinking one and ended up discussing, you know, climbing mountains in nepal because that’s something we found together and that brought us into the conversation that’s great when i was when i was as a plan giving director at a couple of colleges, i would look for things in the office that would make a connection, whether it was, uh, well, i’m not too much of a sports guy, so but i had to sort of hold my own in sport because i don’t really know much about it, but lots of guys do. So if i see a sailboat and i need to know where you know, where is it, you know, looking for that connection that you’re talking about. Mindy yeah, because as you said several minutes ago, people give to people right? And they love your work, but that connection with the person critical. Karen, how do you like to prepare for your for your meetings, let’s say it is a solicitor. I broke my voice broke again, you know, because in the last interview says that we’re talking about sixteen to forty year olds, so i think i’m going back to puberty. My voice just cracked. Sorry. How do you like to prepare let’s say it is a solicitation you’re asking from someone for ah, mid six figures gift. How do you like to prepare for that meeting? Well, i would add mindy’s whole list i would add to that they’re giving history with us potentially they’re giving history with others so that we have a sense of whether we’re asking them for the biggest gift they’ve ever given or not the biggest gift they’ve ever given, because that depends on their willingness, their capability and their potential eagerness. And then i now in my career that i can sort of go with that earlier on in my career, i liked to practice, i actually like to sit down and practice asking because until you mike’s, we do a role play with a staff member with a development person board the boardmember for the two of if it’s a boardmember and myself for six figure gift, we would might go with two people. We need to sit down so we know who’s going to do because usually sometimes you run the risk it’s a great meeting your back and forth and then, like you’re looking each other, like who’s going to ask so everybody’s role needs to be very clearly defined. And i think you need to practice saying the words, and i’m hoping that you will consider a gift of whatever number you’ve planned on two the organization and until you can actually get those words out of your mouth, and the best way to do that is practice it so often that it’s a sentence like anything else, it will become second nature. You know, that’s, the ceo is fund-raising m v p i’ve been with mindy dietz, president of learning leaders, and karen pearl, president and ceo of god’s love. We deliver ladies, thank you very much for joining me in the things this is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics politically expressed. I am montgomery taylor, and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com oppcoll are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com. I’m ken berger of charity navigator, and you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back, it’s time now for tony’s take to this month is our one year anniversary. In fact, this show is show number fifty one, so fifty two weeks next week will be shown number fifty two, who fifty one shows this is it, sam gives upload that’s the vast audience that’s sam, our producer. So later this month on the the only show remaining this month, next friday, the twenty ninth we’re bringing on to new contributors both talking about law that will be jean takagi and emily chan. Their law firm is the non-profit and exempt organizations law firm or neo ennio. They’re based in san francisco. Gene is the publisher of the non-profit law blawg, which you’ll find it non-profit law blawg, dot com and emily chan works for him and is a contributor to that blogged. They’ll be joining me next week and then in august on august twelfth, i’ll be welcoming maria simple. She is the prospect finder, and she’ll be a regular contributor on prospect research for your non-profit she’s, a popular speaker and also a consultant in that area. I was on tv this week with esa aaron’s he’s, the consumer reporter for new york, one news his segments in the eleven o’clock news they’re called consumerwatch, and he and i were talking about the irs is automatic revocation list that list of two hundred seventy five thousand non-profits in the country that have lost their tax exempt status automatically. We talk about what that meant for donors to those charities and also for the charity’s themselves, and that was on time warner cable. That was tuesday. No, that was monday night on time warner cable, but i’ll have a link on my block, probably by the time this show is is airing the b link on my block and you can find it there. The post is called i’m on tv with a psa aarons, my block, of course at m p g a d v dot com and also this week i did stand up comedy at gotham comedy club that was a wednesday night show. I was part of a new talent show and the video for that will be on my blog’s soon, not this week, but shortly when i get the video, i will. Certainly put it up there, it was great fun and people did laugh, so it was a success because it was a comedy club, after all, and so that’s cool, this is year number one very exciting on very happy to be welcoming those those three experts as regular contributors and that’s tony’s take two for friday, july twenty second. It’s time now for my conversation with scott barnett talking about the fine art of conversion pre recorded at fund-raising day in new york city back in june. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven, we’re at the marriott marquis in new york city. My guest right now is scott barnett and scott’s conversating scots seminar topic is the art of conversion got his director of web communications at fairfield university and has a diverse, extensive background, both academia and business again the art of conversion scott barnett welcome to the show. Thank you, tony, for having me your conversion what we converting well website users into donors in this case, or visitors or sales or people that visit your site you want tohave him either tour visit, talk to you, contact you because the sites can manage and collect information on them that we can’t do with other mediums. Okay, now at fairfield university, i assume the web users are mostly alumni. Well, mostly on the admission side, forgetting students for this is the admissions of the things that make things go around. Are basically students first. Okay. And then after that, alumni and donors and the public is, well, you know, most colleges have a pretty strong athletics presences. Well, so you get a diverse set of visitors, including than your faculty and staff, that come to the site and your current students. So we’ve got to take that multitude of audiences and sort of track what they do on the site for the different purposes. And then we have clients, so to speak, in our agency model that we work with at the university that have different needs, admissions has one needs, advancement, has a different need for their users, and athletics has another new let’s talk about the younger people that so you have to engage seventeen year olds on the seventeen, eighteen year old earlier than that, actually. Okay, how early is thirteen? Which reality? By law, you can’t collect information about anyone under the age of thirteen anyways, online, but and that’s the copper act. Okay, we basically and let’s not let’s be clear here. People were not collecting information about you. Tony martin martignetti too old. Yes. If you’re not interested in somebody there’s not anything personal about you until you give that up. Meaning fill out a form or or our donate or do something that actually collects that information. But the mere act of visiting the site and moving around through the site is anonymous other than by i p address on other information that then is gleaned from that i p address. But khun tell the generally the part of the country you’re from the provider that you came through and that information’s helpful. But we really want to know is where did you go? On the site. When did you leave us? Did you make it to the point on the site where we wanted you to? So you set up goals and you try to convert them to finish those gold. Okay, we’ll get we’ll get to that part once they get to their. But how about engaging let’s? Talk about the sixteen tio, eighteen year olds. How are you attracting them, too? Fairfield allusions that’s the magic ball. Okay, we’ll share some shares. We presently just put up a very interesting online tour. Now. Everybody’s got their online tour in the college business and it’s usually a state and proper voiceover narration. Nice voice like yours or someone speaking about all the beautiful pictures and great academics and great athletics and all the other things we have and we’ve got a lot of that on the site, but we decided to make a tour that really spoke socially from the students to the students. So through the eyes of a student, we created a siri’s of videos of them waking up in the morning, going a class a typical day in the life. Okay, so so the lesson is and tell me if i’m oversimplifying, but you’re attracting people of a certain age by using people close to that age. Oh, sure tracked them. We, while we want to direct the campaigns that we wantto have the kind of creative ideas it’s it’s proven in today’s internet world that there’s a sort of peer-to-peer conversation going on. We see that all over and letting them speak to each other about the experience of being the student speak to other students, you know what their interests are, and whether this place is right for them. Because it’s a big decision to go to college and it’s really important for students to pick the right schools. We want him to pick us, but we also want them to be getting the right information. So the adults in the room, so to speak. I have lots of good information to put out there, but we also want them hearing information from their peers on dh that’s. Why we do things like this and believe me, it’s it’s slightly reality tv but there’s no magic buy-in the box it’s it’s segments in the day that we’ve selected arika and such but they’re presented from through the eyes of a student. And then after you have the student now at the site, how do you keep them engaged and coming back again? That let’s say sixteen to eighteen year old right seldman you know the public site on the dottie? Do you side is really a marketing vehicle to get people information about the school about our news and our events so there’s a lot of information on a one particular site of students for one one that’s really in tone and approach about them. We also created a space called fairfield live, which is a social media, a space where that we post videos have a weekly announcement video that’s done by a couple kids from the campus about what’s happening that weekend again the idea peer-to-peer conversations and try to get them coming backto find out about events both through four one one in fairfield live the potential admit e our potential applicants is brought into some systems we have where they then become a contact, you know, and in that sense, we developed them as a prospect. And that there’s a lot of communications that happened back and forth between the parents and the student and the admissions department, both in person. The biggest, best indicator for kids going to college state is their campus visit. So you really want to convert them to contacting you and showing out coming out, coming live right? I know a big part of your seminar topic is using google analytics track how you’re doing and part of what you say and the materials is don’t be afraid of mountains of data. So how? How so understanding that the audience for the show is small and midsize non-profits which fairfield may or may not fit into could be a mid sized mid size too large right in the college, right? That’s what they bite-sized so what? What’s your sort of opening advice for using google analytics and not being overwhelmed by it? Well, it has more than enough data for you to spend your time hiring people to sit there and call through data, but it’s really drilling down, tow what’s useful to you and you create goals and objectives for any piece of communications and the internet. You know what? Before we get into that, how would someone just get started with google analytics? How do you how do you find? Oh, yeah, i’ll let you get yourself a gmail account, you have that, and they they might have relaxed that, but you get a gmail account, you visit google dot com slash analytics and then you sign in and then you’ve got an account you then need to set it up for your various domains. So in our case dot e d u plus all of the sub domains, the various departments and things underneath it that we find interesting. Good that’s. Helpful. Thank you. Chart, please. So the data itself, you know, you can really really get lost in the data google analytics, but the real key is understanding. What is your goal with the particular communications? You know, everything needs a little a pitch. Okay? And what? We need to be able to use analytics to analyze that pitch what’s working in that pitch and let’s say you created three four page experience on the site. You really want to be able to follow that user and find out why is everybody leaving on the third page and not making it to our contact page and buy the data itself is not useful to you unless you analyze and react okay and create that same communication cycle we know from the business of where you have tto basically communicate, get audience feedback and then change the communications to adapt to that that’s exactly the same thing going on here except the fact is, with the internet, we really can great the success and failure of certain types of campaigns and experiences on the web by having that tracking all along the steps of the experience and i think you have very good advice, too. Your date is only as good as your use of it and your reaction to it, right? You have to tweak, and it takes a lot of training. I mean, we’ve we’ve worked with some consultants, and we ourselves have sought out a lot of good, valuable training material on google analytics so that we could understand what’s going on and that’s just my department web communications. So then we went out and took all of our account managers in our division and trained them about the reports. What does the report mean when your client comes to you and says off, tell me how many people are coming to our website and how many are visiting, you know, our department, they know howto look at the data and not get lost in the multitudes of pages that aaron, google and alex just look, create the report they needed sabelo then sit down and discuss the conversions that are going on, what steps might be taken to adapt and change the material to make it more useful to caesar. Now, first again, for a small and midsize shop. Do you think the tools that are on google analytics alone are sufficient for a charity? Tio navigate this, this melon of data was collected. Do they have to have a consultant and training well, outside what google oppcoll google has a lot of it’s own training it’s and it’s. Very good. You know, we found it necessary to speak to a consultant because we really wanted to draw out of it a lot of different things, but i think that most companies can get in and at the level that it at any level and use google’s materials to get a lot of training and know how you got to spend the time with any software and that’s really what it is. This software is a service you’ve got spend the time on training, honor it’s a waste of money. Well, in this case, it’s no money. So it doesn’t cost you anything to do google analytics except your time. Tto learn a little bit about how you can use it. And i think that that’s the key there is that the the end user, whether it’s, a mom and pop shop running a little sight, or whether it’s, a big no uber university up there, everybody’s, cost conscious. And this way you’re getting something for free. That is got a wealth, wealth of data. It’s, really, how you look down through and decide, have i created goals of it, created objectives and my following those and whether you want to know if someone from you, becca, stan, came to your site or not, you could do that, too. But you can’t be wasting your time if that’s, not your target customer. They didn’t even think that shooting getting, thinking, you’re listening to the talking alternate network e-giving. Nothing. You could. Xero looking to meet mr and mrs wright, but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your car relationship as fulfilling as possible? Then please join us, starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with morning alison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Please tune in and call as we discuss dating relationship and more. Start your week off with love in the morning with marnie alison on talking alternative dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays, one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting do you want to enhance your company’s web presence with an eye catching and unique website design? Would you like to incorporate professional video marketing mobile marketing into your organization’s marketing campaign? Mission one on one media offers a unique marketing experience that will set you apart from your competitors, magnify your brand exposure and enhance your current marketing efforts. Their services include video production and editing, web design, graphic design photography, social media management and now introducing mobile marketing. Their motto is. We do whatever it takes to make our clients happy. Contact them today. Admission one one media dot com talking dot com. Lively conversation. Top trends, sound advice, that’s. Tony martignetti, yeah, that’s. Tony martignetti non-profit radio. And i’m travis frazier from united way of new york city, and i’m michelle walls from the us fund for unicef. No. What about the standard social media facebook twitter again? Let’s, let’s focus on you know, i knew you were going well eventually, yeah, let’s focus still on the younger like this is interesting. I don’t get many guests were talking about engaging teenagers sixteen eighteen what what’s your advice for the small non-profit around? Well, you know, again the magic bullet is facebook’s overwhelming success in the last two to three years really made it imperative that you have some presence there, but you need to manage that presence and understand that everybody knocking on your door and saying, you know, all we need to facebook page for this, we need facebook page for that for each individual campaign or something that’s, not a good use of resource is when you’re a small ship does become unmanageable, and then you end up with a bunch of stale pages. It’s a sight that people have two contribute content is king okay with all of this and look and repeated repeated continual contact right now. But what we’ve seen there is, you know, you’ve seen some good reaction to causes on this social media. When people do cause related things, they do. Well, mom, i think i think this younger audience reacts to that us is a company and larger companies that are selling products, you know, i’m not so big on the i light, yeah, nameless brand of soda here that i or something so we don’t get in trouble, but the the point being, i’m not so sure that that, but i think today’s younger set doesn’t think the way we think about, you know, in terms of brand association so it’s a little different in that with juggling act you have to do, and i think non-profits obviously, mom, the kids are into causes, they are muchmore involved group i think we may have grown up thinking we were very involved, but i i didn’t do most of my charitable work until i was out of college, but i see a group of kids now from my school on up that are very usually, you know, there’s a good percentage and they’re involved in things so that’s appealing to their nature in social media about the cause rather than the give, i think, and not being the fund-raising professional in our organization, i won’t speak two, whether that’s scientific enough, but i’m seeing the trend be that they are attracted to sites that are about the causes and then from that i’m sure you get your able to glean and pull through the conversations you create some some charitable giving and giving of time. Sometimes what you’re looking for out of that group is volunteerism. Oh yeah, cause they’re so passionate, motivated, they will give generously of their time, but they’re on it all the time. And my test lab is the fourteen and sixteen year old i have at home, okay, who spend all their time on their phone and they’re computer on facebook sometimes to my chagrin, because it’s just kind of, you know, but but if that’s what they’re doing, you know, you need to focus your communications to them and not have it be the man talking to you and that’s. Why we’ve worked on this key peer-to-peer conversations looking at ways to engage students that work for us to to to speak to them, whether it be for a cause or whether it before something like advancement or admissions over athletics. We use students all of those levels in fact, our libraries facebook site is operated by a student, yes, the powers that be in the library there and sometimes push things out to them to put out there. But the conversations that are going on that’s the important thing about facebook and twitter is making it a conversation it’s not just boom boom boom press release and say we suffer from that sometimes to put them all out there, but we also want to get in there sometimes. And for instance, we introduced this year it’s it’s off the fund-raising topic, but if at our athletics games tweeting during the games and facebook during the games because there is a core of alumni out there that follow us out there, they might be in california, they’re not listening to the internet, cass, to the game or didn’t pay for the video of the game and they’ll jump in and have a conversation with us about it, and we look at that it’s sort of being colored guys, i said, imagine yourself sitting there and we’re having a conversation about the game because that’s what we’re not doing play by play, nobody wants twitter play by play, but we have a conversation about what’s. Happening, and i think we’re going to introduce that this year two different types of events, not just athletic and i think there’s value there for the audience, so your constituents who can’t be with you can follow and they’ve chosen that medium that’s, what they’re doing to follow you so it’s almost disrespectful in some ways to not give them some content besides just pushing at um, you know, like i said, press releases and other information, my social i don’t interrupt because my social media manager is here regina walton and she is live tweeting, right? Regina, we’re live tweeting to arouse who are not this second, but we are during the day giving them the contest. Not this second. Are you finding more penetration among teenagers? At twitter? There was a time when it was forty year fifteen over i also teaching in and that marketing class not now and then on the side and last year we asked him and said, hey, how many in the room are aware twitter? And this is their kids in marketing that we’re going to go into business and three hands went up, but now you won’t have four people. In your class is no, you’re not a very popular teacher now twenty five, twenty five but, you know, doing that part time, i was able to see that they were aware of it as a medium, but to them it didn’t hold much lustre. But now i’d say, just even six months later, that was just last, you know, two semesters ago, there seems to be a great interest in our student affairs department and other areas of using twitter because the immediacy of it and the ability to do it in one hundred forty characters or less appeals to both the presenter and the receiver, and i think that once they’ve caught on to that one hundred forty by the one hundred forty, okay, well, i want to stretch it out a little bit. Are you whether you want to be shorter, you know? You want it, you know, i wish i could do it in ninety nine, where most people meet me want me to do it? Ninety nine words or less. We’re gonna leave it there. I want to thank scott barnett very much. Fairfield university for being a guest. What? Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage. Of fund-raising day two thousand eleven at the marriott marquis scott, thank you for having me. Pleasure. That was my conversation with scott barnett from fairfield university on the fine art of conversion. I want to thank all my guests from the pre recorded interviews at fund-raising day this year, mindy dietz, karen pearl and scott that was a ll interviews from the association of fund-raising professionals, new york city chapter fund-raising day conference last june was great fun being there, and we’ll have more of those interviews for you in august next week, darien rodriguez haman we’re going to talk about his book non-profit management one oh one and the social media for non-profits conferences that he’s organizing throughout the country. My show is a media sponsor for the new york city conference on august fourth, so we’ll be doing speaker interviews there and bringing those to you and also, as i’ve said earlier today, welcoming jean takagi and emily chan to their first show, we’re going to talk about starting a non-profit preliminary question, should you? Because there are alternatives and if you do decide to start one, how do you do it? Gene is the publisher of non-profit law blogged, and emily is a frequent contributor to that site i look forward to welcoming them is regular contributors. Next week, you can keep up with all that’s coming up, especially in this anniversary year this anniversary month. Well, it’s one year, but the month is the one year anniversary. Sign up for our insider email alerts on the facebook page. Of course it’s, facebook, dot com and then the is the name of this show tony martignetti non-profit radio while you’re there, please, like us, become a fan of the show, you can subscribe and listen any time to the show on the device of your choice but that’s, computer, smartphone or tablet, go to non-profit radio dot net and that’s, our itunes paige subscribed there. The creative producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is claire meyerhoff, our line producer and the owner of talking alternative broadcasting is sam liebowitz. Our experts. Social media is by regina walton of organic social media. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio always heard fridays one to two p m eastern right here. Talking alternative we broadcasts always on itunes hope you’ll join me next friday right here at talking alternative. Dot com. Bonem metoo you didn’t think that shooting. Good ending. You’re listening to the talking alternate network to get you thinking. E-giving good. Looking to meet mr and mrs wright but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your car relationship as fulfilling as possible? Then please join us starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with morning alison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Please tune in and call as we discuss dating relationship and more. Start your week off with love in the morning with marty allison on talking alternative dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. You’re listening to talking alternative network at www dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Do you want to enhance your company’s web presence with an eye catching and unique website design? Would you like to incorporate professional video marketing mobile marketing into your organization’s marketing campaign? Mission one on one media offers a unique marketing experience that will set you apart from your competitors, magnify your brand exposure and enhance your current marketing efforts. Their services include video production and editing, web design, graphic design photography, social media management and now introducing mobile marketing. Their motto is we do whatever it takes to make our clients happy contact them today. Admission one one media dot com. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy police call a set two one two nine six, four, three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom, too. One, two, nine, six, four, three, five zero two. We make people happy. Durney talking.

050: Engaging Generations X and Y – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Sandra Lamb of Lamb Advisors
Leslie Goldman and Casey Rotter of the US Fund for UNICEF

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://mpgadv.com

View Full Transcript
Transcript for 050_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_07152011.mp3

Processed on: 2018-11-11T22:42:11.400Z
S3 bucket containing transcription results: transcript.results
Link to bucket: s3.console.aws.amazon.com/s3/buckets/transcript.results
Path to JSON: 2011…07…050_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_07152011.mp3.791046497.json
Path to text: transcripts/2011/07/050_tony_martignetti_nonprofit_radio_07152011.txt

Good afternoon and welcome to the show. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio, and i’m your aptly named host tony martignetti we’re always talking about big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, and last week was no exception we had the morning after the big event, three guests explained how best to follow-up your events and why it’s important to include follow-up plans in your pre different preparations? That was a recording from fund-raising day in june in new york city, and the second segment last week was giving us a two thousand eleven report we had holly hall features editor from the chronicle of philanthropy, talking about her concerns from last year’s report and how they were answered in this year’s report, and then bob evans joined me. He was fromthe e-giving yusa editorial board, and he shared some important conclusions from the report this week. It is partnerships, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions. Sandra lamb of lamb advisers talks about collaborations of all kinds between non-profits where they write for you, when should your board be talking about? Um, how do you decide what organizations to collaborate with? And what is the process for doing that? Then engaging generations x, and why leslie goldman and casey rotter from the us fund for unicef will share their expertise on the subject there, both in those generations. But we don’t know their ages for sure. On all of thiss weeks, guests are from fund-raising day conference in new york city last month. Those two segments will be after this break. Stay with me. You didn’t think the tubing getting ding, ding, ding, ding cubine you’re listening to the talking alternate network to get you thinking. Nothing e-giving duitz are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s, create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed hi and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com duitz looking to meet mr and mrs wright, but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your car relationship as fulfilling as possible? Then please join us, starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with morning alison as a professional matchmaker of seen it all, please tune in and call as we discuss dating, relationship and more. Start your week off with love in the morning with marnie alison on talking alternative dot com. Talking alternative radio. Twenty four hours. Hyre no, this is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven, we’re in times square in new york city at the marriott marquis hotel. My guest now is sandra lam. She is president of lamb advisors. Her conference seminar topic is share the wealth creating and funding winning organizational collaborations sandra, welcome to the show, thank you very much. Tell us about lamb advisors first, you have interesting niche in in working for non-profits absolutely my niche is working with non-profits on mergers, acquisitions, collaborations, partnerships, lots of words we can call it consolidations, strategic alliances and your seminar topic is creating and funding these alliances. I would guess start with how do we know when we need some kind of a partner in a smaller midsize non-profit how do we know my my thought is that it’s a good topic of conversation to have at the board? Because you’ll find out, as you have that conversation that’s strategic alliances are part of ah portfolio of strategic initiatives that aboard should be talking about at all times. Ok, so there are this is not because we’re not only talking about mergers, but taking someone over or being you know, it doesn’t have to be the end of the organization, this could be a very friendly partnership, so absolutely in fact, when you think about it, they really have to be win win partnerships, they’re both both agencies have to find find reasons to want to be working together in a closer relationship. And so then again, the audience for the show is small and midsize non-profits how would ah on executive director bring this topic to the board? How did they convince the board that this is something that should be talked about? Ongoing? I would advise an executive director to talk with a chair first and begin the conversation there with the executive committee, and then i suppose i would advise her to hire someone like me to work with the board because my experience is most most boards don’t initially think of this as something they want to get involved with. That’s not true all the time, but it’s often the case changes, changes difficulty. Why do we have to change why we should think about joining forces with another non-profit so it does help to have someone like third party facilitator to really begin. Working with the board on the advantages and disadvantages of such a such a combination. Okay, what are some of the advantages of a partnership? A major advantage is it is a way to grow the mission of the organization, grow the mission. And i want respect through a partner who brings more clients, brings a geographical spread, brings even new sources of funding possibilities, brings real estate space. That might be important, but just to grow the impact of what the non-profit is currently doing. Okay, is there a committee on the board where these conversations should start? Maybe after the executive committee, where where would where were the conversation go? Well, i would say after the executive committee, it’s, a conversation the full board should have. Now, i will eventually work with a smaller committee of the board on a much more frequent than regular board meeting basis. But at this point, it’s a it’s a really a full board conversation. Okay. Strategic conversation about the future of the agency, which ought to include thinking about murders. Well, mergers. So we have been talking about partnerships before. So what does a merger look like? All right. The merger? Merger zoho word that has lots of different meanings. I use it just to talk about any kind of a coming together of two non-profits to form a closer relationship which benefits the mission’s about. I used the word murder for a very simple reasons. It’s a short word and many of them were. And its many of the words that we used to come together in a closer relationship are long and are cumbersome and our stuttered over. So this was a short word that says two non-profits air going to form a closer relationship. Okay, and neither one of them sacrificing their identity? Not necessarily in some cases, yes, but not necessarily. Okay, so let’s, talk about the where the board is considering something friendly, bringing in a partner that does have some of the advantages that you suggested, maybe more space or more clients or geographic breath that the the organization itself does not have. How do you go about finding the right organisations? Toe look out to reach out to after after the board has decided. Okay, let’s do ah, but let’s let’s look beyond ourselves. How do you start knowing where to look? Okay, well that’s that’s, a research phase and i start real close to home. I talked to the executive director, the senior staff and the board members. They may they may know some other organizations they admire or that do the same kind of work they do, and they may know other board members on this board so you could start right there. But then you spread out and look att websites look att similar mission organizations look, a umbrella organizations look, a government organizations that work in the same area found most foundations will have lists of their grant by issue area on their website, and you can see where foundations air funding, similar types organization so it’s a typical market research to get a long list of of potential partners and then begin to narrow that list down by by eliminating those that don’t fit the kind of criteria that the board and i have put together that was necessary. Okay, so this is still in the research phase. You haven’t still reason haven’t reached out to any of those organizations on your list yet. That’s right? Ok, so not so different really sounds like from unemployment from hiring perspective. From your you’re doing research star, search it’s. The same kind of thing. You have a description of it’s, not a job description, but it’s. A description of what who you are and what you want in a partner, and what that partner may want in you. You know, you’re buying and selling, as i often say. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three that’s two one two, seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police crawl are said to want to nine, six four three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom two one two, nine, six, four, three five zero two. We make people happy. Hyre hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com geever metoo and let’s talk about that. What? What you may want so it’s going to be critical to establish i would think goals what’s the what’s, the objective where what we’re trying to do with this partnership? Exactly, it is critical and you have to know what you’re looking for and what we’re shopping, and you have to know what you want to buy, right? And so the kinds of things we talk about our with the board and with the exec director are where where do we have needs? What are our weaknesses? You might say where where would we like to improve? So we could improve delivery of our mission, and this could be anything from we need better office space or better programming space to we need to have other diversified funding streams that maybe we could be introduced by another by the partner to, uh, we need to we need to just fine some place where we will have a more stable future outlook, a larger organization within who was umbrella, we can have a more stable outlook. Ethan annual particularly is true an annual smaller non-profits and the annual push to try to balance that. Budget, raise the money and survive. So there are lots and lots of reasons that non-profit might be looking at another non-profit too, to merge with and so after we’ve done the research and pared the list down to ah, a short list who? Well, i’m assuming the next step is starting to reach out to the potential partners exactly who does that? We i always work with kayman the boardmember and the executive director i try to work at a high level is possible. I occasionally will make cold calls myself if no one knows someone on the other side, but we really try to find a connection within the agency to reach out. And there is a script i write the script, which on the phone call goes out, yes. So now this is the interesting part. I’m interrupting, but who makes? I mean, when the first call comes, we’d like to be your friend. Or you know how, tio, how do you script that you’re calling your cold going of a strange organization? Or maybe you know of them, but they don’t know you. How do you make that first contact? What does it sound like? That’s? Assuming that the person that we have calling out knows that other person or or or has a connection of some kind, it may not be direct knowledge, but khun drop a name of knowing that usually goes like this. You know, i’m on the board of x and we’re thinking about our strategic alternatives, and one of the things we’re thinking about is entering into a closer relationship with another non-profit where we we could both benefit from that relationship. This is a terrific organization with a wonderful model of service, and we think it’s something that might be valuable to for you to consider. Can we sit down and talk about it for a few minutes? But you’re trying to get a meeting is trying to get a face to face i’m very tactful, i wanted face to face meeting and almost most people will say, sure let’s, let’s talk, let’s, let’s explore and that’s really all we’re asking in that first meeting exploratory meeting and that would be a meeting with the executive director and you ask for a boardmember or two to be present for that first meeting? Yes, if possible. Yes, i’m with sandra lam. She’s principle of lamb advisors at fund-raising day two thousand eleven her conference topic is share the wealth creating and funding winning organizational collaborations we’ll get to the funding part right now. We’re talking about starting to create them. So you have the initial meeting, then with board member or to an executive director? What are you looking for? What what’s? Your objective in the first meeting. Well, you always want to end the meeting with next steps, bond. So the next step would be to say, look, this has been a good meeting. Let’s sign a confidentiality agreement each way. Mutual confidentiality agreement exchange cem information which would not be in the public domain because presumably, we’ve researched everything in the public domain. So this would be confidential and let’s, let’s. Learn more about each other and continue the conversation. That would be the next. Okay, um, at this point, red flags that would lead you to believe that because you’re talking to a few organizations now, this is your short list. How do you start to get narrow down to that one? What kind of things bother you about some that would lead you to say let’s? Let’s. Drop them from the conversation. Well, first of all, some will just fall off because they won’t. They’ll decide that they’re not interested in us. So marsh art list of its five to ten it’s going to cut cut back a little bit, probably even after that first meet on its own. Yeah, but then you’re looking, you’re certainly looking for mission fit. And if you have misinterpreted the mission fit in the course of your research, that would be one reason and the big the big reason would be financial if you start seeing that that the other organizations financial picture is not as you expected. And one of the things that confidential information permit you to do is to see maur in depth, the financial situation, oh, and past that, you know, if you’re looking for let’s, say, you’re looking for leadership, you’re looking for an executive director and you find well, first of all, that that wasn’t a particularly encouraging part of the conversation. And second of all, the culture is so different that we really have trouble with my staff getting them getting them into this other culture. Culture is critical, right? Very critical. We we see a billion dollar fortune, one hundred companies with failed mergers or, you know, less than less than the results that are promised to all the shareholders on the day that everybody’s shaking hands and because they just didn’t fit from from a culture percentage, the organizations were very different, you know, the people are very different, and we’ve just seen that recently in the financial crisis way have and so what is your role in and at this stage of the process? Well, i’m i’m daily guiding this conversation that is going on, providing information, analysing information, coaching the executive director and the board on the next steps from the very minor tactical to the very major strategic moves that were making during the course of this transaction. All right, we’ve narrowed down to one wait, jump again, ok, we’ve gone down from five to ten, some fell off. We’ve decided that the other the remainder is we don’t need or they’re not appropriate. I should say it that way. We’re down to one. How do we how do we say you’re the you’re the you’re our choice? Well, by this time, we’ve learned a lot about each other. And we’ve learned what each thinks it can provide to the other remember, this is a win win, so we both have to win. So at that point, i’m usually drafting a memorandum of understanding i’m not a lawyer by training, but i do this in non legal ways, a memorandum of understanding and agreement. What letter of intent, whatever word you want to use, the point is we’re putting on paper the understanding of the two parties, that sort of high level this is general principles of a little more detail than that, okay, yeah, it gets into gets into what again, what we expect and what they expect from the relationship pre nup. Okay, okay, and that takes us into a phase of negotiating on dh making you always find out that you’re understanding wasn’t exactly like what the other person’s understanding was, of course, so so we’re in a stage of of clarifying on negotiating on dh about this time a lawyer is very helpful because then we’re really getting we’re we’re moving towards the point where we actually have a written agreement that a lawyer has blessed that that describes the relationship that we’re we’re trying. To form. Okay. And how do we, over time, make sure that the relationship is working, as both parties had intended winning for both sides as we go a year, two years, three years into the collaboration how do we assess the success of it? So we don’t end up like the multi billion dollar fortune? One hundreds? Well that’s critical and difficult. One of the ways to do that is board members from each organist nation constitutent board of the combined organization. So you have boardmember sze watching over the who know what’s in the agreement and watching over the execution and the impact of what they’ve done. If it’s a full merger that one of the organization’s essentially has been merged into the other, there isn’t a lot of legal way you can. You can there’s much. You could do it and why it can be. But if it’s aah looser a filly of your partnership around a program, you can end that at any point. It’s just simply not working. And you want you can unwind it. Should your agreement specify benchmarks for success between this supporting let’s say it is a partnership around a program is it worthwhile to put that into the agreement? Yes, it is. It could be in the agreement itself so that when if there is a falling out or an unwinding it’s very clear that certain benchmarks that were expected have not been made, it should make the unwinding a little less painful. Okay, i was thinking that would set expectations at the at the outset. Okay, that’s creating the creating the partnership was talking about funding it. That was the other part of your workshop here at the conference. How do we fund the issues around funding? Well, the issues around funding are primarily it’s, not cheap, and it takes oppcoll and it takes resource is from each agency, both cash resource is and indirect just time of people working on it, which is a cost, and we’re still on a stage. I believe where the of the foundation world is not yet funding that many of these of these mergers. What we talked about is that if you’ve got a relationship with a good room’s, strong relationship with a foundation already dahna this is capacity building money we’re looking for, and if you’ve got that kind of relationship with that agency, that foundation that does that kind of funding, i think you’ve got a good shot at getting getting agency funding, getting foundation funding, but by-laws i will tell you, it’s, not not every foundation will will step up from the side, you know, so so it can’t be self-funding then it’s not likely toe proceed, then it is far more difficult can’t be self-funding there are some community organizations that make community trust organizations, and there are some there are some groups that some foundations that do this kind of funding there’s one particularly i might mention called sea change lode star, which is a national funder of mergers on dh they they’ll consider once the two ncis where we are in the process. Once the two work together in terms of deciding they wantto proceed, they will they will come in and take a look at it. If they think the merger makes sense, they will fund about a third of the cost in-kind they look, they’re looking for a couple of additional foundations to fund the other two thirds generally rule of thumb. The name of that organization was sieges in the s e a change. Sea change lode star l o d e s t a r center lamb is principal of lamb advisers hyre fund-raising day two thousand eleven conference topic is share the wealth creating and funding winning organizational collaborations. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven at the marriott marquis hotel in new york city. Sandra, thank you very much for being against my pleasure is pleasure to have you there wouldn’t be anything, do nothing, e-giving duitz you’re listening to the talking, alternate network duitz wanting to get into thinking. E-giving cubine duitz looking to meet mr and mrs wright, but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your car relationship as fulfilling as possible? Then please join us, starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with morning alison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Please tune in and call as we discuss dating relationship and more. Start your week off with love in the morning with marnie alison on talking alternative dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays, one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting do you want to enhance your company’s web presence with an eye catching and unique website design? Would you like to incorporate professional video marketing mobile marketing into your organization’s marketing campaign? Mission one on one media offers a unique marketing experience that will set you apart from your competitors, magnify your brand exposure and enhance your current marketing effort. Their services include video production and editing, web design, graphic design photography, social media management and now introducing mobile marketing. Their motto is. We do whatever it takes to make our clients happy. Contact them today. Admission one one media dot com talking. Metoo welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven at the marriott marquis hotel in new york city and my guests now are leslie goldmen, senior director of major gif ts for the u s fund-raising assef and casey rotter, manager of unicef’s next generation also with us fund for unicef. Ladies welcome. Thank you. Thank you. You’re working to engage young professionals. How do we define young first, casey? Well, generations x and why, but we specifically narrow that down to between the ages of twenty one and forty. Okay for unicef. That’s twenty one to forty. Leslie, why don’t you start us off? Just generally, how do we engage that twenty one to forty? Set? What do your general principles? Sure for us at the u s fund-raising major donors so when we’re engaging generations x and y, our mission is to engage future major donor so those who can give individual gifts now or hopefully in the near future and just how does units have to find major gift? Sure for us, that’s five thousand dollars or more so some of this group can or does give significantly more than that and others work hard to engage their networks to give it that level. And so we’ve formed a steering committee and e-giving circle and five labbate committees that really allow twenty one to forty year olds to get deeply involved with unicef. Okay, you mentioned gen x and gen y now on tony martignetti non-profit radio we have jargon, jail. There may be some people who don’t know what gen x in general. So why don’t we case you want to define those gen x and general i please off the top of my head generations lima jen a member of generation? Why so proud, member? I think i mean, i think they’re actually now between the ages of sixteen and maybe thirty, okay, but for obviously for the us fund, for unicef’s purposes, we brought that to twenty one to thirty, and then i believe generation lie off the top of my head is thirty two forty think forty six that’s other technically defined, so we we’ve decided to focus that, but this group is generally mobile. They’re well connected, they’re committed to humanitarian organizations. Many of them are extraordinarily well traveled. They care about the world at large, so for unicef, there important prospects for us to engage, and they also bring a lot of passion and commitment to something that they become involved with. So when we looked at filling our major gift pipeline, this was a group that we felt was important to engage now, because when you engage young people in an organization, as their philanthropy go grows, we want that to grow with our our own organization now, certainly, the web is critical, teo twenty one, toe cultivating twenty one to forty year old major donors. But let’s, start elsewhere. Is there? Is there? Is there other strategies outside the internet that are cultivating twenty one to forty year olds? Go ahead, leslie. Oh, sure. I think that for us we started with a very active core of friends of the u s funds. So what we wanted to do was to bring them together so that they could be educated about the us fund, that they could feel like they were making a difference. And that they feel like they were bringing their networks together. So that’s, where our steering committee. How are you, casey? How are you bringing them together? Well, we hold. Steering committee meetings and then we hold programmatic receptions and events on dh then we also have smaller subcommittees that kind of narrow in on specific areas, whether it’s events or social media, and they give up their time that way. Let’s talk about good you want to make a point before you were asking how we fund-raising pacific lee from them besides webb on, and one of the ways that we found to be really successful is that we have the group, the syrian committee with thirty members who study different issues that are affecting children and choose to fund specific projects s o that we as an organization have many different proposals in different areas of our work, and so they’ll vote on a proposal to adopt, and then it will have a specific goal monetary goal in a specific outcome as well. And then the group so votes on that and then a book fund-raising for that committee it’s the committee deciding on their own, you’re really empowering the young volunteers, letting because they’re gonna have the most passion for something that they’ve decided they want to do, right? One hundred percent it’s been something you forced. On them, yeah, it’s been really successful not only as an education tool, but as a great fund-raising tool because it encourages they have a sense of urgency and then also a sensitive buy-in that they ownership over that specific project, yeah, sure, the first project that they raise funds for it was called project sprinkles in guatemala and that’s providing micro nutrients to children in need. And because of the success of that project, we were able to take the steering committee down to guatemala to see firsthand what they did. And so, in terms of, um, making them understand the mission of unicef, how we actually accomplish our work on the ground and allowing them to tweet, to block, to hold events, teo, get their friends together. That trip was really essential, and that all came from this project focus where they’ll choose a specific focus, and i think it’s important for people to recognize that your organization doesn’t have to bring people to guatemala, you could bring bringing them to fourteenth street in manhattan if that’s where you’re doing your work well, you’re bringing them and showing them right. Exactly, and i think many other organizations probably. Haven’t easier time than that. Then we do where most of our programs aaron in developing countries. So we try to be kind of experimental and innovative into how we and bring the field to them. Well, so we so often have conference calls with are you with our field staff in the grounds that they’re working in or whenever they’re in town? We hold receptions, more education, mission centric education program? What do some of the events look like that you might host, maybe more social events? Eso if an organization wants to engage his twenty one to forty group, what should they be thinking about in terms of events? Well, specifically, we have two fund-raising events each year, and then we hold smaller cultivation receptions as well that her more program focused, but our two fundraisers with ticket prices are a masquerade ball in the fall, which that kind of embraces augments are current existing campaigns with unicef, which is triggered treat for unicef is a big program we have so this age group wanted to add to that, and they did a masquerade ball that kind of celebrates trick or treat for unicef. But for these the specific age groups, and then we also have every year we have a photo benefit where we’re showing photos from unicef’s work in the fields and that’s ah, usually at an art gallery, so it kind of gets more of the different set of people to attend and there’s more education and program integrated into that so they learn while there, viewing the images, and then all the images are also up for silent auction. I’m going to guess that the twenty one to forty year olds don’t react too well when they’re told what the organization would like them to be doing. And so that goes back to the point you made earlier about having them decide on their own what a committee is going toe. What committee he’s going to take on a priority? Yeah, and what? And one of the things that they felt was important as we were building out unicef snaps generation was this educational component, so they’re invited toe lots of events. They’re invited all sorts of social networking events for all sorts of organizations, and sometimes he’ll come to an event, leave an event and really not quite no what organization they were. Even benefiting so, the steering committee felt it was really critical that the programmatic aspect of unicef be part and parcel of everything that we do. So for example, this photo exhibit has a big educational component, so we’ll have a wonderful photos from the field from unicef’s work, but also facts next to each photograph of something that children are enduring an area that that photograph is taken, for instance, and our steering committee is exceptionally well versed in unicef’s work. So throughout any of these social events, well, here, very rich conversations with their friends about believing in xero that xero children dying of preventable causes, which is a huge mission of unicef and, you know, other other fantastic conversation, so they’re well educated, but they’re also willing to be a thes very social events and taking that mission out there for and every single thing we’ve done is has their buy-in and they feel ownership over that these two events that we do each year came out of their ideas in their brain storming and so that really buy them driving them, you know, it gets them motivated and wants tio they then they bring in their friends and they attend, and they feel very passionate about this project. You hear a common theme about empowering them, having them decide what the what the priority is going to be, and then they’ll be so much more passionate about it. Exactly. And then there’s philantech people grow with us as well. Now, leslie, did unicef do research to find out why young people were leaving events and they didn’t know what they were supporting? Actually, i’m not sure if on that, but on the research side, casey actually has her master’s and fund-raising from gnu and while she was there so heimans center, of course we have guests coming later. Doug white. You know, douglas isn’t okay. He’s been on my show and he’s gonna be on today too. But he’s been on for a full hour talking about one of his books now that’s cable casey’s thesis was on engaging generations x and y in the life of non-profits. But at the same time, she was working in the gift planning department at us fund-raising as a case study for her thesis. And exactly so the research comes right from one of our vario. And so then she was able to craft her own job description, using all of this fantastic thesis research and use that teo craft. This great program, that’s. Great repurpose ing of your of your pieces, turning it into a job. Dafs you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics politically expressed. I am montgomery taylor, and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com oppcoll are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com metoo so you were at usf while you were doing the degree? Yes, yes, i was working in the gift planning department, and i kept on, you know, in my class, i was hearing a lot of organizations complaining about an aging donors, and i was working and gift planning. So i was on the end of the spectrum, and so i was dealing with a lot of older little shorts. And then so i kind of started asking, what was our average doner, where we having an aging donorsearch face? And we found that our average doner was sixty two years old, and one thing that eunice is really great at is instilling a culture of philanthropy among children, we, you know, they grow up trick or treating for unicef, which is something i actually did when i was younger, and then we have teach you nastad programs in schools where you learn curricula about children in developing countries, and then we also have can’t we’re on campus clubs in high school clubs all around the country. And so i actually trick or treat for unicef when i was younger and then was part of my campus club, as well, when i graduated, there wasn’t anything for me to really do continue to do to get involved besides donate, which which i did, but they’re still not that action or the next. So the young cultivation khun lied to future employment exactly, and so many people can actually get job way had to find some other way pipeline gets narrower, a zit, these two employment that’s outstanding. All right, so we’ve talked. We haven’t talked deliver lee about the internet because i wanted to start elsewhere, but let’s, go to social media, the web casey generally, how are you engaging twenty one to forties on the web? Well, they’re engaging themselves. So what we’ve done is we’ve launched so kind of wherever you know, we have a limited budget and limited staff time for this. You set up in infrastructure? Yes, my voice just cracked a sixteen years. We were talking about sixteen. Forty and my voice yeah, i’m now free puberty altum my voice has changed. Sorry. So kind of where we see our shortfalls we kind of employed the group to kind of a brainstorm and figure out what we should do so about a couple months. Ago, we launched our social media committee so it’s, a subcommittee it’s run by a steering committee member and all they’re giving circle members that are part of our next generation group and in tandem with our web team, thie us one for unicef and our social media manager, they you know, they developed a plan for what next-gen oration should do so now we’re on twitter. You can follow us at unicef next-gen we have a great facebook page and a lot of their fund-raising is done through the web we have ah, unicef, if you go to unicefusa dot org’s, backslash next generation that’s our main page and it’ll take you to all the other pages, but they fund-raising they create their own fund-raising pages as well, and then there’s pages per each project that we’re doing at the time. Eso it’s really taken off what’s great is the group, you know, divvies up the work, and every month they kind of create a new plan for what they’re going to do on facebook and twitter and whether they’re going to highlight a unicef program or initiative that’s going on at the us fund, or then then they also celebrate each other and things that they’re doing in their personal lives as well. A cz for unicef. I’m with leslie goldman and casey rotter. Both are with us fundchat ghisolf unicef’s next generation and they’re seminar topic is developing the next generation of major donors one of fund-raising holy grails, you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of next of know this is not next-gen this is fund-raising day two thousand eleven next-gen is coming in november back-up let’s, let’s continue talking about some of the social media properties. So, of course facebook, twitter using foursquare at all of people checking in at all. We’ve kind of played around with that not necessary just for next-gen for older, for our other initiatives in tandem with the next generation. So unicef tap project, we haven’t figured out where it’s going to go necessarily yet, but it’s it’s definitely in talks okay, leslie any any consideration of ah app before for next? From extra for next-gen i haven’t been involved in any of those conversations yet, have you? We? I mean, we have some we their social media committee there’s someone who creates app so they’ve kind of talked. About it, but we think we need to grow our facebook and twitter platforms first before we kind of reach out. So we have a good network, and so we’re we’re building that now and then in the future, that’s something that has been brought up in the organization as a whole has developed a great apse, particularly surrounding trick or treat for unicef and the tap project to raise money for clean water program. So i think that as the organization gets more savvy on this, which i have done this year, we’ll be able to really partly that and use it for next-gen okay, okay, casey let’s, let’s talk about the the, uh, the person who develops aps now, so he had here she was here, she she so she had an interest, but the organization doesn’t feel it’s quite ready for developing that going that direction. How do you then? But you managed that donor so that and so that they’re not turned off. But, you know, remain engaged, i think it’s being straightforward and honest with them, you know, giving them the ownership. She’s wanted she’s, the co chair of one of our of the social media committee so i think it kind of while she shot it out there, the group, in discussing it kind of came down upon themselves in the most and was like it’s really not the right time for this to be as successful. So i think just explaining the situation of where you are and bringing them into that decision making power and kind of guiding the conversation, too, so that they get there on their own has been pretty successful. Leslie, you were saying earlier that people who were in the next or next-gen are also invited to other other events that are not next-gen events, so talk a little about tryingto get the different generations toe mingle. Oh, sure, when we started next-gen it was really the end of two thousand eight, meaning the economic situation had taken hold. We did not have much budget, so that meant that we had to look at what re sources were already existing at the us fund, how we can tie in next-gen to things that were already happening at the organization, we sort of lost initially the ability to craft our own events and such, so we’ve got a fantastic snowflake ball that happens every year in new york and los angeles, and many members the committee have bought tickets at that event, but also they’ve engaged their parents to buy tables at the event, so that shows that they’re influencing the older generations their families to get involved with. You know, stephan, we’ve got a lot of young people that take part in that event way. We have a junior snowflake committee, and several key members of our steering committee came from that committees they had already been involved in that we just had a incredibly successful event in los angeles called playlist with the a list, which was amazing karaoke event with some celebrities kind of thing you can only do in l a and the committee out there decided to give the balcony to unicef’s next generation because we have three steering committee members and a subcommittee out in l a. So they sold out the balcony, and that was a way to get their friends to come to next-gen teo unicef event. It was a way for the organization at large to be able to sell more tickets and invite more people, but also garnered a lot of press for the event and the next-gen er’s who come, they do a lot with social media, teo further promote the event. So that’s been really a win win? Is those kind of connection points and the committees the grownup committees for those events kind of provide their their mentors for them. So we sent next-gen members to those committees, and they learned they came back, they were energized there like this committee is amazing, we need toe grow and become that in the future as well. And we also have board are our board’s pretty supportive? So we’re trying. We’re starting to create more mentorship opportunities from our board or there are there any next-gen members on the bored of us fund for unicef? Actually, just recently, we’ve extended an invitation to one of the next-gen committee members to join the national development committee. So now when there’s, a new committee formed for a national border there’s an opening, they will turn to us because we’ve got so many fantastic people involved in say, you know who do who do you have? We recognize that they’re up and comers is leaders to the organization, yeah, and our boards recognizing that it’s the next-gen members that are going to take their places boardmember zzzz they retire from the board and they’ve been committed where we’re actually scheduling some small breakfasts with board members and, say, three or four members the steering committee teo, talk about what it means to be deeply involved with an aw for-profit that that mentorship piece on dh mentorship and including that board four development also developing them, bringing them onto the board. Leslie goldman is senior director of major gifts for us fund-raising ghisolf casey rotter is manager of unicef’s next generation at us fund for unicef. Ladies, i want thank you very much for joining us. Thank you very much. Pleasure. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven new york city times square. Thank you very much. Thanks, tony. My thanks to all my guests from fund-raising day two thousand eleven the fund-raising conference in new york city in june. That would be sandra lamb of lamb advisors and leslie goldman and casey rotter from the us fund. Thanks, ladies, for sharing all your expertise at the conference. Keep up with what’s coming up. Sign up. For our insider email alerts on the facebook page, facebook, dot com and then the name of this show you’ll find out what is coming up from show to show, and in fact you’ll find out what’s coming up in the next show because i don’t know yet on while you’re there, you can also become a fan of the show, even though the host doesn’t know what’s coming up next week. That’s not a reason not to become a fan you can listen to the show anytime on the device of your choice ipad, iphone, other tablet computer, and you can subscribe to get the show downloaded to your device automatically, seamlessly by going to non-profit radio dot net and subscribing on our itunes. Paige, the creator of tony martignetti non-profit radio, is claire meyerhoff, our line producer for the show, is also the owner of talking alternative broadcasting, and that is sam liebowitz. Our social media has always done expertly by regina walton of organic social media. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio on july fifteen, two thousand eleven hope you’ll be with me on july twenty second. We don’t know what’s coming up, but it’ll be a good show, always at talking. Alternative broadcasting found at talking alternative dot com i think the shooting getting, thinking thing. You’re listening to the talking, alternate network, waiting to get you thinking. Thank you. Cubine. Duitz looking to meet mr and mrs wright but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your car relationship as fulfilling as possible? Then please join us starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with marnie allison as a professional matchmaker. I’ve seen it all. Please tune in and call as we discuss dating relationship and more start your week off with love in the morning with marnie alison on talking alternative dot com are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications? Then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way look forward to serving you. You’re listening to talking on their network at www dot talking alternative dot com now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Do you want to enhance your company’s web presence with an eye catching and unique website design? Would you like to incorporate professional video marketing mobile marketing into your organization’s marketing campaign? Mission one on one media offers a unique marketing experience that will set you apart from your competitors, magnify your brand exposure and enhance your current marketing efforts. Their services include video production and editing, web design, graphic design photography, social media management and now introducing mobile marketing. Their motto is we do whatever it takes to make our clients happy contact them today. Admission one one media dot com. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy police call a set to one, two, nine six four three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom two one two nine six four three five zero two. We make people happy. Durney talking.