459: 5-Minute Planned Giving Marketing & What’s Fair Game? – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

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This week: 

5-Minute Planned Giving Marketing
The best person to reveal my wildly simple Planned Giving promotion tips is me. (Originally aired 8/18/17)

What’s Fair Game?
Info you find on LinkedIn about a potential donor belongs in your report on the person. What about Facebook and Instagram? What if the tidbit is embarrassing or compromising, but valuable to your org? Should you friend prospects to learn more? Maria Semple walks us through the ethical conundrums. She’s our prospect research contributor and The Prospect Finder. (Also from the 8/18/17 show) 

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

449: Leadership & The Power Of Failure – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

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This week: 

Leadership
Nikki Henry wants leaders to communicate effectively, set clear expectations, break down barriers, embrace DEI, and more. She’s CEO of Ladies Leading Ladies and she spills it all.

The Power Of Failure
Failures are as powerful as success stories to rally folks around your cause. Whitney Raver encourages you to embrace your bungles and botches – and share them with your communities. She’s chief development strategist at What’s The Word. 

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

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Hello and welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit Radio Big non-profit ideas for the other 95% on your aptly named host. Oh, the Video guide for non-profit marketing, which is the definitive guide. I’m in it, they quoted me. Ah, and it’s a very astute, articulate on accurate quote. They got it right, Um, in all its students and articulateness, this guide is from type Ito T y p i t o type a type edo dot com. They’re the canvas of video. The guide includes the strategic like acquisition, engagement, stewardship and tactical, like lower thirds and captioning and text animation. You’ll find this thing that I’m in at t y p i t o dot com and I thank them for including me and I’m glad you’re with me. I’d get slapped with a diagnosis of Dalek. Oh, several ism if you hit me with the heady idea that you missed today’s show leadership. Nikki Henry wants leaders to communicate effectively set clear expectations, break down barriers embrace D I and more. She’s CEO of ladies leading ladies, and she spills it all. Then the power of failure failures are as powerful as success stories to rally folks around your cause, Whitney Raver encourages you to embrace your bungles and Boches and share them with your communities. She’s chief development strategist at What’s the Word on Tony Steak, too? Show number 450 Responsive by Wagner C. P A’s guiding you beyond the numbers. Wagner cps dot com By koegler Mountain Software, Denali, fundez. They’re complete accounting solution made for non-profits tony dot m a slash Cougar Mountain for a free 60 day trial and by turned to communication, Shin’s PR and content. For non-profits, your story is their mission. Turn hyphen to DOT CEO. Here’s Nicky Henry and leadership. It’s my pleasure to welcome to the show Nikki Henry. She is the founder and CEO of Ladies Leading Ladies, a company dedicated to helping women and non binary people grow as supportive leaders. She’s a passionate dork. She’s at ladies underscore leading underscore, and the company is at ladies leading ladies dot com. Welcome to non-profit radio. Nikki Henry. Thank you so much, Tony. My pleasure. What’s a passionate dork? So I call myself a dork because I am super, uh, nerdy in the way that I want to make sure that data and research backs up what I am teaching with leadership. As I was growing as a leader, I always went back to the data and research and my undergrads in psychology. So I just have that nerdy numbers data research part of me. But I’m super passionate, and I I have worked in non-profits for the last decade because I care about families, and I care about our communities. Okay. Uh, it’s fair. Of course. You know, that was that. I didn’t label you that. That’s Ah, that’s your idea, That is, um So we were supposed to connect that? Ah, 1990 sea. And then you were so passionate about helping your audience on. They wanted so much of you afterwards that you couldn’t make it to the recordings boost on time. And so now so here we are, many months later, but I’m glad it worked. Doubt metoo piela very. For a while, I was a little I was a little noncommunicative. You e mailed. And then I said Okay, hold on. I’ll get I’ll get to you when you know when I have a breaking schedule. So I don’t know. I hope that, uh see, I like Esso I was not reaching out. Um, I like to lead by fear and intimidation. Um uh, condescension. You, no doubt. So that’s my style. That’s right. That’s why that’s why I wasn’t getting back to you. I mean, we could have done this the first week after ntcdinosaur. I wanted to exercise my leadership in my, uh, my white male privilege and authority. Oh, my goodness. Just so fun. Yeah. So I feel like that’s my leadership style. Is that is that is that in line with what you’re doing at the lady’s leading ladies? You know, I feel like you just did my intro and the opposite. Yeah. Okay, so my my method is the antithesis of yours. I would say so. All right. I don’t know. Fear and doubt and loathing and condescension. They seem to work well for me, but all right way don’t have to go down that way. Um, So you want Thio? Well, tell me what leading ladies leading ladies is about. Yeah. So this company really came out of my own experience in the workplace. And like I said, I spent about 10 years in non-profits working in different leadership roles, and I noticed a couple of things. One, especially in the nonprofit world, were very much trial by fire. I got thrown in, um, you know, as a first time leader and had to figure it out. So there was a lot of that imposter syndrome going on with me. A lot of the scared that people are gonna find out. I don’t know what the heck I’m doing. Um and so I just dove into teaching myself. So I definitely saw that piece. I saw that lack and I saw that white space, especially with our non-profits on properly training and investing in our leaders so that we conserve our community’s best. And the second thing I saw is one of the programs that I worked with. We scaled rapidly over a five year period. We went from four full time employees to 55 during that time that I was there. And so we had a ton going on. And what I noticed was specifically the women that I worked with who were incredibly hard working so intelligent, um, and had been with me from the get go, weren’t throwing their hat in the ring for those promotions. And for those management opportunities. And so I got to really chat with them and dig in. But I know this isn’t a unique problem. This is something that we’re facing in our workplaces where we have a lack of representation of really strong, amazing women in those leadership roles. Okay. And you want to turn that around Exactly. Okay. Uh, so you’re some of your advice is around effective communications for women. So what are what are what are women not getting right that they could be doing better around communications And And how do we sex it? You know what’s fun s o with the with the business. I really have a passion around bringing women and non binary people into representation and leadership. But what I teach is not gender specific. And what I actually found, the more that I dug into research and data, you know, from Gallup in different areas is that if we’re gonna go with gender stereotypes, women are actually better prepared to be the most effective leaders. Based on what the data is showing us, an effective leader looks like. And what that means is now we need coaches. We don’t need managers. We need. People who are focusing on relationships are focusing on development are focusing on, um, that communication, bringing together multiple perspectives and really creating a team versus just the top down, you know, crack the whip type of accountability that we may have had in the past and may still have in many workplaces. So it’s really about that communication and getting to know your people one on one as human beings and how you can uniquely motivate them to be the most successful team member that they could be. Okay, s o teamwork. Collaborative. You know, people, uh, we just have, like, a minute and 1/2 or so before before our break. What? How come we, uh s So how can we break down the barriers that exist between leader and following, You know, whatever Employer, employee advisor, supervisor worker. I mean, is it as simple as just like social events o r. Go deeper? I think it’s deeper, and I think it’s two main things. I think that it’s training and rewarding our leadership for being those supportive leaders or as burn a Brown says a daring leader. Um and then the second piece is really focusing on diversity equity and inclusion. I know you were speaking about that on a previous podcast where we really have to dive into our own identity is the identities of those that were working with and be able to really embrace the assets that come along with that diversity and an inclusive workplace. Yeah. Yeah, we did. We get ah, a couple of d I topics and 19 ntc and we talked about it before that. Um right. Why don’t we, uh, take our break right now? Pursuant. They’ve got a podcast as well, and there’s there’s is go beyond. It’s hosted by their vice president, Taylor Shanklin, who’ve been a guest on non-profit radio a couple times. Ah, a couple of recent episodes of go beyond our Self Care for Leaders and four digital trends. For 2019 you will find the podcast Go beyond at pursuing dot com slash Resource is now let’s go back. Thio. Nikki Henry. Okay. Thank you for that indulgence, Nikki. Henry. Absolutely. Go take care of our our sponsors. Um all right. Um So how do we so I’d like to get into some some, you know. How do you do it? Not just not just not just what to do, but but how So how can How can an effective leader get to know they’re there? There, folks better abila more, more personally. You know, as you were saying, Yeah, So at 19 NTC, um, I was going through this with our group there and some of the three top things that I really focus on our your communication. So both in meetings and facilitating those meetings, setting clear goals and just motivating and engaging your team. So one of the things that I really push, um, and have seen work in my own work but also in others is that our leaders take time to sit down one on one on a weekly basis with each of their direct reports. And when I say that people screeched to a halt because nobody needs more mean eight meetings, nobody wants to be stuck in meetings more than they already are. Right? So it’s really about how to make those meetings productive. Um, And how Thio, I understand that making that investment of time these weekly one on ones or 25 30 minutes make that investment of time is actually going to give you more time on the return because you’re having less of people knocking on your door and saying Hey, do you have a minute? Hey, can I ask you a question? Hate kanai This on the same page? You’re aligning at least weekly. Nobody. Converium off course too far if you’re really talking on a weekly basis and you work into that weekly conversation a human element as well. So asking people about their Weiqing of weekend asking people about their family and making sure that there is that human element in it as well as we move forward. Okay, this is related to something I just read on Seth Gordon’s Blawg. Okay, basically, he was talking about slack. You know that we don’t have to be so tightly, um timed and so efficient in the in the short term that in the long term we’re going to suffer. He uses the analogy of airplanes the way you know it. Sze time down to the minute. And if there’s a storm, you know when every plane is being utilized in the short time in the immediate term there’s a storm or a breakdown of an aircraft, there’s no slack built in. So the whole system cascades and can collapse. If there’s a storm in L. A or New York or Chicago Santa, um, the whole country can come to a halt aircraft. So, um, you know, So his recommendation is, you know, don’t be so short term focused and build in some what you might consider to be inefficiency in the short term. But in the long term, it’s gonna be it’s gonna give you rewards. That sounds like you’re saying, have these weekly 30 minute meetings. Um, what you’re gonna know they’re gonna cause you a little tightness in, but in the long run, you’ll get you’ll get Amore, I guess Committed employees who you get to know someone who’s gonna be more likely to come to you with a problem instead of quit when there’s a problem. Exactly. Take a week of Lee sick leave and then quit while there’s reportedly sick. They’re out looking for you. Actually had an interview. Yeah. Yeah, they’re gonna talk to you and you’ll develop amore more committed. More, more collaborative employees. Exactly. All right. All right. So 30 minutes, 30 minute, one on ones. You okay? What What else do you like to see so and a lot of these, they might sound like we’re going back to the basics, right? But another latto always. That’s not always, but that’s not always bad. Yes, we could use a more basic. So I think it’s important because we might know these things. But practicing them is a whole different thing. So I also talk about smart girls, which again people kind of roll their eyes because I asked everyone in the room How many of you have heard of smart goals? Almost everyone raises their hands, right? And then I asked people, How many of you are utilizing that when you give out, you know, a task list or goals to your team members? Crickets? Very rarely are people actually looking at. Okay, we’re talking about what our priorities are for the weak. I’m, you know, helping someone to set those priorities. But I didn’t take the extra 30 seconds, one minute, two minutes to go through and make sure that it was specific that we know how we’re measuring success. But it’s actually achievable that it’s relevant to what we’re working on the big picture. So we’re not just doing busywork and that there’s a deadline that were clear. And if we actually took those act extra 30 seconds to two minutes to go through that with things that were asking of our team, we would have such a more efficient workplace. But also we would have such a better relationship because our expectations are a lie. And we know what’s being asked of us. We have clear expectations. And also, as a leader, you’re going to get a project or a product that is actually what you asked for versus that person trying to read your mind and ending up. You get something and you say, What the heck is? This is not what I asked for it all. And you know okay, yeah, clear expectations, any anything. So let’s ah, shift a little bit from Well, they’re all related. But expect eight expectations setting no more advice around making that clear for people. Yes, I think that you know, those two things really tied together. So the smart girls on the one on ones because you want to be talking early often, Um, and especially as we are in Thio, a millennial generation that’s taking you know, is the largest part of our work force. You’re gonna see the same with Jen’s e J. Expect early and often immediate feedback. And so that’s going to increase that relationship. Increase that communication and decrease the times that you’re really going to end up with someone not understanding their expectations and veering off course so early and often regular feedback, both good and bad. Eso really balancing those? The other thing that I will say, especially because you’re putting these extra meetings on um on the calendar, is don’t hold meetings that could have been an email, so you’re already taken the time to sit down one on one. Don’t hold the weekly staff meeting or the weekly department meeting. If you’ve got nothing to say. If you’ve got no nothing that needs to be brainstorm or worked out as a team, if it’s just an update to policy, it’s a memo. It’s a schedule whole thing. Shoot it in an email, don’t add more time to meetings because that’s why people really, really dread them is because they’re just sitting in something that they could have read in an email in five minutes. Okay, you’re, uh go, Just go on back to the first point you made about being honest. You know it, Sze totally unfair to an employee Thio to find out at the annual or the semi annual performance review that you know there’s a problem with something exactly. And it’s been festering for months. For months or something, you never give the person a chance. Toe improve. Now you’re now it’s formal. Now it’s written now. Now they feel like they’ve been shat on Andi and they got like, a blind sided races versus having a conversation with him in one of the 30 minute one on one meetings. You know, there’s a problem. This is not. This is not the way we I want this done or you’re not meeting expectations or whatever the heck it is from from the hours you keep to the attire to the to the smelly food you do in the kitchen. You know, whatever it is, you’ve got to tell people and give them a chance to improve. Absolutely. And it’s something that leaders really struggle with, right? There’s a lot of the times were promoted into leadership positions because of the good job that we did in our last position, not because we particularly have leadership skills or or those types of things. It’s a reward for doing a good job. And so that means that we get a lot of leaders who haven’t had any leadership training. I think the last study that I looked at, over 45% of current leaders and managers have had no leadership or management training at all. We treat it as if it’s a talent or a natural ability, where, as it’s a skill just like learning, excel or learning a new database, Um and so a lot of people are conflict avoidance. And so they have a hard time having those easy at the beginning conversations about you know, Hey, you’re wearing too much perfume and it’s given so and so a headache. You know, something silly like that. They don’t have that up front, and then it turns into like what you’re saying. They’re being blindsided in a formal evaluation instead of just having a quick conversation. So building those relationships and trust and respect on a weekly basis also helps the leader to be more comfortable to bring those things about with with their employees and with their team members. But it’s also something that has to be practiced, and it has to be rewarded in the workplace as well for our leaders to be assertive and thio Thio knit problems in the bud and have those open and frank conversations. If someone says they don’t have enough time to do 30 minute meetings with everyone that reports to them, does that mean they have too many direct reports? So I was just going to say I have one of two answers. Either you are overseeing too many people directly, Um, or you are You don’t have any time because your people are constantly interrupting you. So there’s, you know, to kind of pieces to that. So if you’re generally speaking, if you are overseeing more than 10 people directly meaning there is no level of, you know someone in between, there’s not another person. They can go to. A lot of the time CEOs think. Well, I oversee the entire company. No, no, no. Just your direct reports. Um, if you’re overseeing more than 10 then probably you’re not able to give them the time that they need to be a coach versus just being a manager, and that is going to hold back your employee engagement, which then holds back the success of your teams in the success of your organization. So that is one thing. But the other piece is people think that they don’t have time. Well, if you took intentional time with your team, you would see within a month. If you really committed to this, you would see a huge amount of time saved because you were dealing with it on the front end, versus being reactive. Okay. Okay, Cool. Um, how about some motivation, huh? You touched on little Bit’s talk about explicitly motive motivating the folks who work for you. Yeah. So each of your each of your employees is a unique human being there in the work that they do for unique reasons. So getting to know them in those weekly meetings and elsewhere to understand why the they do the work they do is gonna be incredibly helpful to you as a leader, because then you can tap that’s specific reason to help motivate them. But more generally, I think there are a couple of things that we can do to motivate and create an engaging work environment as well. I think one thing is encouraging friendships at work. So not being the boss that walks into the room and then everyone’s a she because you’re not supposed to be talking, um, so allowing that also creating opportunities for people tohave lunches together to get together off the clock toe, you know, feel like they can actually create, um, these relationships that help them to be more resilient in the workplace. And I think also one huge piece of motivation that I think is often missed is talking to people about their long term development. And I talk a lot about doing that through what I call stay interviews and not just me. Everybody calls him stay interviews, Um, but a stay interview is a play on an exit interview. We get all of this really robust, amazing information when people walk out the door. Well, why don’t we ask those questions once or twice a year or once 1/4 and get that really important information? While we still have the talent, Let’s keep the town. Let’s retain them so deeper into their development in their long term career planning. So asking questions like what is it that troubles you here. What would you do differently like that? Exactly? Yeah. Taking exactly those exit interview questions and turning them into stay interview. So why do you work here? What do you love most about your job? What would you change if you had a magic wand and have that authority to do? So? What are some benefits that would make a difference to you wanting to stick around in this job? You know, things like that. Okay, Uh, now on the friend you know, that sort of developing the friendship side. I’ve had people say that they resent some of that. Why did they have to be friends with co workers? They’re they’re happy to have them. His coworkers. Why do they have to take them on his friends? I you know, and I totally get that. And I hear that as well from folks. And here’s the reason why, as a manager or a leader, you should push this because through research and study specifically through Gallup, they have shown that those who have a best friend at work are significantly more engaged and therefore significantly more productive at work. And when you think about it just, you know, anecdotally. Of course, If I got to show up every day and work with my best friend, I’m probably gonna be more happy to be there more eager to show up. You know, a happier human being and knowing that I have someone that I trust that I convinced to all of those things having that resiliency within the workplace is is fantastic. Not everyone’s gonna do it. Not everyone is going to be that engaged employees. They’re gonna be that there are going to be the types that one o’clock and clock out, go home, not talk about their personal life. Keep a very compartmentalized life. But I will say is the generations go on. That’s less and less because people don’t see the clear delineation between their work-life in their home life. Especially with technology. Yeah, especially right. Right. That’s that has changed. So much of our work-life is interwoven. In-kind personal. Okay, um, any, uh, any, like, special or, uh, types of events that you like to see or something fun that maybe people haven’t thought of it. We could all go out for drinks. You know, maybe it’s a bowling night, right? pizza on Fridays. You got something something special beyond the humdrum stuff that I just named. Sure, I think what’s important is to actually give your employees ownership over this. So what I’ve done in some of my past work places is to create. And they called themselves the fund committee. Um, but to create that committee and actually allow the employees to decide what they want to do with that time and if you can throw a little budget at it Wonderful. But also again coming from non-profit. Ah, one of the places that I worked with. We just did not have the budget for that. You know, we’re very Grant restricted and and we weren’t gonna get that that fund money. So what we decided to do instead is we worked with our controller, and we all decided to deduct $2 each paycheck to go into a fund committee fund because we wanted to get to know each other better. We wanted to have teamed building on, and it’s completely optional. And it’s a knot of, you know, we don’t send out the list to say, Hey, so and so is not in the fun committee. Um but, you know, allow that and then allow them to decide what it looks like with your approval to make sure that you’re not having an HR nightmare or you’re not, You know, misusing funds or anything like that. But let them have ownership. Let them decide, Let them tell you. Okay, okay. To try to ah, tryto resuscitate myself or laser tag. Laser tag. Could you do that? That’s not humdrum. I lovely attack. Yeah, Yeah. Um uh, Anything else you want to say about motivation? You know, I I think what’s important And this is something that I think we’re actually relatively good at in the nonprofit world, but is important to come back to We have to come back to our mission and we have to come back to our why on a regular basis. It’s really easy when we air show stressed with multiple grants and funding streams. And what not to get caught up in the numbers and your team? What they hear when they just hear numbers, numbers, numbers is that you’ve lost touch with the client. You’ve lost touch with the families. You’ve lost touch with the communities that we serve. So making sure that you’re bringing yourself back, but also as a team that you’re spending time to really reflect on how you are serving your miss mission, which is most of the reason why. Probably your team works for you right now. Bring it back to the mission. Yes. Frequent, I think. Frequent visits to the mission. Yeah, certainly in terms of new programs or new ideas that are bubbling because this is going to be a collaborative, contributing team, and they’re gonna have ideas, you know? Do they? That may be a great idea, but does it work within what were charged to do? Okay. All right. So we’re talking about a lot about meetings. I’m guessing you have some tips on running effective meetings. Efficient, productive. Happy meetings. Yes. Okay, let’s start with something that’s old friends of mine or the technology. Like the technology rules for meetings our phones allowed. Do you need Oh, my gosh. We only have two minutes left. Okay, uh, let’s do justice to tech rules for meetings. Okay? So I actually, I’m a millennial, so I am guilty of having all of my technology in the room when I’m doing meetings, but at the end of the day, as I’ve worked with people from different generations and different values as well. It doesn’t even have to be a generational thing. Those who do not allow technology in the meeting room, they have been much more productive. And it pains me as a millennial to say that, but it is absolutely true. Leave your laptop back there, leave your phone in your office because you’re their toe work together. And everyone in your meeting should have a reason that they’re there. They should be someone who is contributing to the meeting. Otherwise, they shouldn’t be invited, Um, or made to sit through something. So put the phones away and focus on what you’ve got there and use that collaborative creativity. Okay, Um, now I’ve heard there could be an exception. You know, uh, my my pet is in surgery for my son is in surgery or my dad is in surgery. No. So that could be exceptions for those you know, those kinds of cases, right? I see that. But also that is a weekly, a slippery slope. So here’s what I say. Yes, there are always emergencies, but let someone know for the next hour, they need to call the front office. Then they need to call this phone line. And if there is an actual emergency, your receptionist, your office manager will come in and get you. But if you’re talking about in an emergency, then you pick up that phone every five seconds to check it, and you’re getting out of the flow of that collaboration, okay? And then there’s also the slippery slope, you know? Well, she had her son, but I don’t have children, but I have a cat cats in surgery. My cat is just like a child to me. Exactly. It’s not right. All right. Next to becomes a pet spider than the turtle, you know, gets ridiculous. All right, All right, Nikki. Henry, we gotta leave it there. All right? Thank you, Tony. My pleasure. She’s the founder and CEO of Ladies Leading Ladies. You’ll find her at ladies. Underscore leading underscore and the lady’s leading ladies dot com. It’s time to take a break. Yes, it is. Indeed. Uh, Wagner, C p A’s. They’ve got a free webinar on August 6th. Developing high impact grants. Improve your grants, research and writing. You’ll find it at Wagner cps dot com. Click Resource Is and upcoming events. If you miss it live, then watch the archive. Wagner cps dot com Quick Resource is and recorded events makes perfect sense. Did I mess something up here? Pardon me? Yeah, but, uh, but I didn’t do Wagner. I’m I I did already. No, I didn’t. I think you messed me up. I’m blaming it on Sam because I don’t have any interns. If I have an intern, I’ve blamed the answer we need in turns into show. So I have somebody to blame when there’s a screw up. Like right now, I don’t have one, but it’s certainly not my fault. It couldn’t be so. It’s just that that’s outside the realm of its Not it’s inconceivable, and I don’t mean inconceivable, like uh, like they using conceivable in the Princess Bride. I mean, it is inconceivable, so it must be Sam’s fault. Thea Other thing. The other sponsor that we need to talk about is Cougar Mountain software. Maintaining separate accounts for each fund Ain’t a ning daily expenses reporting to the board, these air or all challenges that you face. That’s why Cougar Mountain created Denali Fund It’s your complete accounting solution specifically designed for non-profits. They have a 60 day free trial. You’ll find that at tony dot m a slash Cougar Mountain. Now it’s time for Tony’s Take two. I’m positive. Sam screwed me up here. I know he did. You left out a break. Okay, the, uh, 450th chauffeur non-profit radio. It’s next. Next week, For God’s sake, It’s July 26th. 2019 is coming up. What’s coming up on the two on the 450th show? Ninth anniversary. Been at this for nine years. 2010 giveaways. We’ve got your coffee giveaways, Of course. Kira is the coffee company that supports coffee growers and workers through providing dental care in the dental care like my voice was crackly. I’m 14. That’s how excited I get back your coffee. They provide dental care because the president of the company, the founder, is a dentist, but they provide dental care to coffee bead growers and workers. As you buy their coffee, you’re supporting that work that we’ve got giveaways from Cure a coffee. I’ll probably go away. Some books from the library, the non-profit Video Library where authors have given me multiple copies of books and What I’ve Got. Live music. Scott Stein, of course. Scott Stein from Brooklyn, who plays are, will play our theme song Complete Cheap Red Wine You Played Completely Through. And then, of course, we’ll count on him to play another song as well. And he’ll be here with this keyboard. Clear Myer. Half our creative producer is gonna be in town. Um, we got all the regular contributors calling in Aimee Semple Ward, Jean Takagi and, of course, Maria Semple. They’ll all call in. We’re welcoming new sponsors. You have heard a couple of shows with them already, but we’re going to formally welcome Cougar Mountain and turn to Communications as our new sponsor. So there’s a shitload going on. Um, and I can say that because my show what I could do, whatever the hell I want. You don’t like it? You’re not gonna stop listening. I mean, well, I mean, you could, but the odds of you doing it just cause I said shit one time so small, it’s it’s inconceivable. So there’s a shitload going on. Be with us for July 26 next week, the 450th show. There’s more on my video out. Could you imagine I could be any more to say on this topic, but watch the video anyway. The video is that tony martignetti dot com and I recorded it in my car. So Zwart watching for that reason since that makes. But let’s do the live listen to love. Ah, there’s a ton of it. Oh, yes, Sam the noisy eh commission. I think that Sam is really screwing up today. You forgot to turn the air conditioner off with my mike. Went live. Now you hear it. See how much quieter is now? That’s because there’s no air conditioning. You heard the buzz. You didn’t know what it was that you really all right. I’m not paying for this week’s show, All right? The live. Listen, love. Where the hell is it? We got listeners in. At least we had. We may have just left in the past three minutes, but we had a few minutes ago. Listeners in Rochester, New York, Tampa, Florida Irving, Texas Washington, D. C. Newburgh New broke New York. I love that straight up, right up the Hudson River. A little bit not upstate New Yorkers. New York City but I don’t live here anymore, so I don’t consider it upstate. Newberg. Welcome. Live love to you. Multiple New York, New York. Um, where else we got? Seoul, South Korea. Loved one soul checks in annual haserot comes a ham Nida Tokyo is with us very loyal. Also very loyal listeners in Tokyo Konnichi wa Beijing Beijing is with us equally loyal Ni hao to our Beijing listeners live love there. Moscow, Russia. That’s a pretty frequent Dublin Ireland. Not sure you’ve been with us before. Um, welcome. I’ve love to Ah, to Dublin. Um And there’s another sheet I left out a whole bunch of sheet coming back here. Alexandria, Virginia. We got listeners live love there, but then going abroad again. Oh, another South Korea yon yon gene or young in South Korea. Also on your haserot Too young Jean Athens, Greece. Welcome. I think that’s new. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Live love to you and Afghanistan. Herat, Afghanistan. I know. That’s first time. I’m so glad you’re with us. Afghanistan. Live love to you and the podcast Pleasantries. They got to go out because it’s over 13,000. You know eso whatever time zone you are, in whatever device you’re listening on pleasantries to you. I’m grateful that you’re with us. I’m grateful the show continues to grow. Uh, I can’t say Week after week grows every single week, but month after month year, the trending is up. So it’s all good. That’s that’s very positive. Pleasantries toe our podcast, listeners all right after that raving ranting. It’s ridiculous. I’m not. Whitney Raver should probably hung up. She was on the phone. If she’s still with us, she’s our next guest on, and I’m pleased to welcome her, Assuming she’s with me. She is the founder and chief development strategist at What’s the word? That’s a growth acceleration agency focused on amplifying non-profit impact. She teaches how to use stories to build trust and raving loyalty among donors. I’m starting to ratchet it down now. I have to have a conversation with Whitney, for God’s sake, get piela linked a woman she and the company are both at What’s the world inc dot com and at oh, what I said, No, that’s not it. It’s what’s the word? Inc dot com? Pardon me, What’s the word? Inc dot com and at what’s the word Inc Welcome to the show. Whitney River. Are you still there? I am here. Who could leave that performance? I can think of a lot of people. My mom for number one and my dad, but they don’t listen to begin with. So that turned them off years ago. Um, welcome. It’s good to have you. You are calling from the Black hills of South Dakota. That’s awesome. That’s way West. You got Mount Rushmore, Badlands National Park. That’s a beautiful part of our country. Yeah. Oh, I love it. I’m 20 minutes away from the most beautiful national mom in the world. And of course, I live smack dab in the middle of four. So I’m surrounded by the most beautiful hills in the world, I think, but at least you might be biased. Like, you know, New Yorkers think it’s the center of the world. But you deserve to think highly of the black hills. So, um what? So you have what are some of the monuments there that you have? So we have not rushmore. That’s about 20 minutes away from my house. We have, like, he said, Badlands. The Black Hills are a national monument, and then we have. My personal favorite is the crazy Horse Memorial has been works there and their longtime friends of his family, and it’s just up. They’re carving a giant mountain buy-in into, you know, putting over the Black Hills. And it’s just incredible to see they’re carving the carving crazy horse into the side of a mountain like Mount Rushmore into hyre Mountain. It’ll be, um, 3 60 It’ll be an entire mountain, not just one face of it. So Mount Rushmore will be will be minimal. Minimize is minimal compared to this 360 degrees. What kind of project? How long does that latto many years? Does that take? Oh, it’s you know, they’re expecting It’ll be done in about 60 years the last time I checked. Plus, they’re also very because they’ve gotten a few new drill and technology has come along. The founder cortex Socolovsky was carrying his jack up the mountain and doing it by hand. It may take 60 years. You cut out a little bit there, but 60 years, you’re incredibly patient in South Dakota, you have to finish that thing in like, 20 minutes. Here in New York, we just start trampling on it or somebody would steal it or Or graffiti it, Uh, maybe 1/2 an hour. Give it. But 60 years. Damn, you have. Um I have a lot of patients I also love. You know, you have that enormous space, South Dakota. And there’s about 800,000 people who live there. Brittney, did you turn me off? Oh, we didn’t turn you off. Okay, You have 100,000 people. I mean, we have We have 8,000,000 in a little island here. Uh, I don’t know what the dimensions are, but it’s got to be, like 1 10/1000 the size of South Dakota. And we have 8,000,000 8 and 1/2 about 9,000,000 or something like that. You have 800,000 in the whole freakin state. That’s incredible. It’s another person. Yeah. Yeah, well, you’re surrounded by a forest. All right. Um, okay, enough geography, but thank you. We never had having had a call from South Dakota. Our guest from South Dakota. So, um, so, uh, this topic of failures little personal for you because you ran for the for the South Dakota House of Representatives. As did it. It didn’t go so Well. Well, yes. No. And we can absolutely talk about way. Are we talking about it right now? What do you mean? We can We are. We’re doing it. Let’s start no more about it than I do so well in that I did not win. Um, I mean, ballots were cast, and I end up going to appear, which, you know, broke my heart. But I did my job. I served three and gave my neighbors a choice. Okay, but what I feel really right was, um, in speeches and to be going in and e-giving a perspective, an opportunity to think of things in a way that they have never Ben exposed to before had just results. And I tell you what, I got dozens of phone calls, and in the days and weeks after that election from people who just said, Gosh, I just wish I had voted for you. What? Why didn’t he? Hey, so if I do it again, it might be a whole new conversation. Okay, but what came out of that, uh, that, uh I had to say that failure, That that lack of success I don’t know. I mean, we could use the word failure. The cell, The second is about failure. Look what came out of that. Would you learn from that failure that informs your your, uh, don’t fear your failure practice really? That people have to be spoken to. You know, I feel like it was closer to my community that the constituents in this district actually trusted. Or after after I had failed and gone back into them and and, you know, um, we’re we’re still in this together. You can still count on me saying that I have had promised Call me email me. Here’s my social media and where no one really did before while I was right, I still get plenty tons of e mails and phone calls all the time. You know, we need a brave voice for this issue. Would you mind keeping us in this capacity? So even though I failed, I think that because I was so open with it and because I was so accepting of it, I really have done a lot more to earn the trust of my community, simply running an offering to take that position. Okay, Awesome. And, uh, we’re gonna go take our first break. And when we come back, that’s a perfect transition. Cause you want, um, you want non-profits toe earn The trust of folks are well, we’ll continue with that. After we take this very short break Turn to communications, PR and content for your non-profit. They help you tell your compelling stories and get media attention on those stories and help you build support, media relations, content, marketing, communications and marketing strategy and branding strategy. This is all of what turned to does. They’re at turn hyphen to DOT CEO. I’ve got butt loads, more time for the power of failure and Whitney River Whitney. So what is this trust That, uh, I mean, it’s I think it’s implicit buy-in non-profit relationships, but we want to talk about it explicitly, asking for trust and building trust. How do you feel that sharing your failures helps? Helps that I want nick down the importance of trust non-profits all over staying a decline in donorsearch ship and e-giving, and it’s really it’s their capacity for impact. And one of the reasons for that is because you were then 20% of potential donors trust organization, and there is a wide range of reasons for that. We as non-profits and as impact creators view the world is it could be has to do a better job of not just vacating our vision but bringing people in on that vision. And that requires a more three dimensional story, um, or hope, view of our And that includes sharing her, sharing our failures. Yeah, um, listeners, I know that Whitney is cutting out a little bit. It’s it’s something in the phone. But we’re pretty sure that if even if she calls back, it’s not gonna make a difference of Whitney. I may ask like I’m a repeat. Something that I I think you’ve said or I asked you to repeat something. Okay, because you’re cutting out a little bit. I think it may help, though, if you speak louder. Okay. Okay. Um, all right. So yeah. I mean, this is this is, uh, consistent with what we know about personal relationships, right? I mean, if to build trust with I don’t know, a spouse, a friend, you know, you you share and and just over time, I mean, you don’t want to share the good things that you share. What’s what’s happening in your life, and it’s not all good. And over time that the people you’re sharing with feel that they’ve been brought into your you brought them into your confidence. Great. You pick each other up and buy a shared your failures and kind of throwing your bungles out there. You give your community a chance, your hero. You tend to take it as a non-profit, the place of the hero in the grand story. And if you read Donald Miller Story brand, you know that Really, Um the odd wants to be the hero. And by sharing your failures and giving them a chance t and help you as part of you, you really give them the opportunity to the hero in that story. And that’s one of the ways you you gain trust and and buy-in. Okay, I’m not clear on something. Uh, making someone the hero of the story could flush that abila more sure to be sure to talk. So, as a nonprofit organization, you you tend to be the hero in the grand scheme of your vision. You are connecting and volunteers to your beneficiaries to serve your mission and the role of donor or volunteers can’t sometimes be inadequately highlighted. The people who stand on the sidelines wondering whether or not they should get of their time or their money are there. They’re looking for some reprieve and by giving them an opportunity to serve you first as xero. So to speak, in the story outline of communication, you give them the opportunity to feel like they’re really important to you and therefore to the mission. Okay, so making your donors and volunteers and Central Central to the story. Great. Okay. Okay. Um, have you seen this? Ah, have you seen examples of this? Any stories you can share that you think I’ve been done? Well, certainly. We’ll tell you about the startup that we’re working with right now. It’s high altitude training. And these these books have an incredible mission. It’s a group of elite long distance athletes who have together to show how sustainable living is the road, who meeting our highest human potential. And they they’re promoting sustainable living practices and agriculture and energy, and they’re using their competition to show to build a community around these ideas. Obviously, as an athlete, you can’t show up and take every time every time you raised rape. Yeah, So we have to make sure that our community and we’re building a wide, um, community of donor sponsors, volunteer participants. That community needs to be with us, and you stand that, You know, we may come in 10 but that is not any less important to our mission. We have to be able to show them how every every failure, every pore, placement, every station is an opportunity to refine our actions and refined and learn more about the lifestyle that we’re trying eat and how to become better at it on dhe. How do they do? They or generally are you recommending, you know, like coming out, right? Like asking for trust Or this is just something that you build implicitly. You know, Bo, what’s it? For the most part, I’ll go back to Tiu Thio, you know, shit. Like my marriage, for instance, my husband and I just celebrated 12 years, and, um, when we when we first started dating, I adamantly against marriage or any, you know, major commitment. Because I didn’t have that kind of trust. And I think a lot of people can relate to that over time. You, you you you work other, you fail together, you grow together and you realize that we’re We’re in this together. You’re important. I’m important. We have to come together to to serve the school. Did you? Yeah. It does make sense. Um, you start by by by sharing. You start by moving it. Build enough of a background you do You turn to them and ask them. Trust me. Don’t need volunteer. Give speak. But in order to make that request valid, you want to spend your time building that relationship and half of half of it is testing. The other half is failure. Yeah, well, it doesn’t have to be 50 50. I mean, you could we could be a little more optimistic. Make it like 60 40 right? Failure, success to failure. And let s oblique is just, like half, but, you know, out there in South Dakota, please, Ideally, it doesn’t come up very often, but when it does, you know you don’t want to You don’t be the ones behind behind the eight ball, you know you want you want to get well, for instance, you know, this is kind of a political topic, but the, um, fiasco in Florida with the Florida charity. Um, they were in a position to receive a station from a questionable fund raiser. Um, you know, as soon as it hit the public act out and there there were two ways to go about handled situation and positioning yourself in that situation. And when we when we come up against, um, situations like that very, You know, 1/3 party may not a lot or best interest in mind, but their actions may not align with our mission. Our vic gold. We take a stand, and instead of receding into the you want to stand up and explain, you know where you are in the story, how you responded, how your response reflect on mission in values and division so that that story isn’t written by someone else. What about selecting the right failures to talk about? I can envision some that you shouldn’t, but let’s let’s put aside the ones that are that are public, and then, you know you have to you have to share. But, uh, you know, there’s some things that you might be a might be a bad hyre or something. I mean, what what types of failures. Would we include or not? Include? Okay, So, like you said some just public And you know, if it’s if it’s going to take off in the media, you definitely want to get that. Yeah, of course. But others include white fun galas. Think things like that where maybe you don’t have the amount that you were hoping for. Yeah, you know, a lot of organizations. What they’ll do is they’ll take their attendees and squeeze them into a little ball and take a picture to make it look like they’re 100. And they’ll put that story out and, you know, talk about the great turn and everything that was accomplished. But we still need you to donate really hard on trust. The messaging doesn’t align. Whether or not your audience really puts the time into unraveling that they know they know that there’s something off and that hurts their trust. What would How would you message it instead? Um, I would mess. It’s typically about like, uh, on event. I was humorously like, Wow, we really bumbled that one. We scheduled this during this other events. Too bad we’re not that popular, you know. But since that we need you guys to show up in this capacity instead. Okay? And you feel like this is something, by the way, we just have about two minutes left. You feel like this is a way, a way to move forward in 2019 and ahead. You see this as an important future trend or current trend and just increasing Absolutely Whether or not, um, the Internet and having you know, all of the station of ages in the pub wolber hand has forced us to be transparent as a non-profit. You are complete both. So you might as well work with that to build a station ship run with it. There are great organizations like charity. My gosh, I’m so gaga over charity water. I’ve never seen such such bold. And I mean almost surreal transparency. And that’s that’s the standard that donors want and need to see any. Yeah. Um, yeah, there’s a video I remember seeing charity water scum. Scott Harrison. The CEO is standing in front of a well that failed in. They do their work in Africa. I don’t remember what countries in but the well collapsed and he said, We’ll be back. We’ll be back And I’m sure I’m sure he sure they did go back. Um Okay. Whitney River. We’re gonna leave it there. Thank you very much. My pleasure. Thank you. You’re welcome. It’s a founder and chief development strategist at what’s the word? What’s the word? Inc dot com and at what’s the word Inc. Next week you heard all about it. It’s the 4 50 If if you don’t. If you don’t remember what next week’s show was about, you need to tune out. If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you, find it on tony martignetti dot com actually already turned out. If you don’t, if you don’t know what the 4 50 it is, you’re already out. Responsive by Wagner, c. P A. Is guiding you beyond the numbers. Witnessed gps dot com by Cougar Mountain Software Denali fundez. They’re complete accounting solution made for tony dot m a slash Cougar Mountain for a free 60 day trial and by turned to communications, PR and content for non-profits, your story is their mission. Turn hyphen to dot CEO. Our creative producers Claire Meyer off. She’ll be in the studio next week. Sam Liebowitz is the line producer is screwed up today. Social shows, Social media is by Susan Chavez. She’s safe. She’s out in California. No guilt there. Mark Silverman is our Web guy. He’s fine. And this music is by Scott Stein, who will also be in the studio next week. You’re with me next week for non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other 95% complete. Turn the air conditioning on. It’s sweltering in here. Go out and be great. You’re listening to the talking alternate network. You’re listening to the Talking Alternative network. Are you stuck in a rut? Negative thoughts, feelings and conversations got you down. Hi, I’m nor in Sumpter potentially ater. Tune in every Tuesday at 9 to 10 p.m. Eastern time and listen for new ideas on my show. Beyond potential. Live Life, Your Way on talk radio dot N Y C on the aptly named host of Tony martignetti non-profit Radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other 95% fund-raising board relations, social media. My guests and I cover everything that small and midsize shops struggle with. If you have big dreams and the small budget, you have a home at Tony martignetti non-profit Radio. Friday’s 1 to 2 Eastern at talking alternative dot com Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business. Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested? Simply email at info at talking alternative dot com Are you a conscious co creator? Are you on a quest to raise your vibration and your consciousness? Sam Liebowitz, your conscious consultant and on my show, the conscious consultant, our awakening humanity. We will touch upon all these topics and more. Listen live at our new time on Thursdays at 12 noon Eastern time. That’s the conscious consultant. Our Weakening Humanity. Thursday’s 12 noon on talk radio dot You’re listening to Talking Alternative Network at www dot talking alternative dot com now broadcasting 24 hours a day. Do you love or are you intrigued about New York City and its neighborhoods? 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387: Big Impact – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guest this week:

Vivien Hoexter, co-author of the book “Big Impact: Insights & Stories from America’s Non-Profit Leaders.” 

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com

277: Innovation In Mississippi & Successful Giving Days – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Aisha Nyandoro, executive director of Springboard to Opportunities and Cassandra Overton-Welchlin, director of Mississippi Women’s Economic Security Initiative, a project of Mississippi Low Income Child Care Initiative.

Also, Caryn Stein, vice president of communications and content at Network For Good.

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com

204: Female Technologists & Hiring Geeks – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Dahna Goldstein, founder & CEO of PhilanTech; Rose de Fremery, founder & CEO of lowercase d Consulting; and Tracy Kronzak, consulting manager at Cloud for Good.

Also Amy Sample Ward, CEO of Nonprofit Technology Network and co-author of “Social Change Anytime Everywhere.”

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

175: Female Financial Literacy & What’s Public On Private Companies – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Alice March, founder of The Attention Factor.

Sheila Walker Hartwell, personal financial planner.

Maria Semple, The Prospect Finder, consultant in prospect research and author of “Panning for Gold: Find Your Best Donor Prospects Now!”

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

129: Some Raise Money While Some Raise Hell & Pinterest and SlideShare – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Marcia Stepanek, founding editor-in-chief of “Contribute Magazine” and new media advisor to the New York University Heyman Center for Philanthropy.

Amy Sample Ward, membership director of Nonprofit Technology Network.

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio it’s that time again. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent i am your aptly named host. I very much hope that you were with me last week. Yes, i do, because last week was lead and matching gifts in your campaign to start professor john list from the university of chicago, chairs the economics department and founded the science of philanthropy initiative. There no longer must fundraisers rely on tradition and conventional wisdom in campaign planning because he shared a rigorous science to guide you around lead and matching gif ts also many matching corporate gif ts chuck longfield, chief scientist at blackbaud had lots of simple ways to increase your matching gif ts from corporations did you know that volunteer hours are also dollar matched by many? We started with sector benchmarking, and we went from there, and my interview with chuck longfield was recorded at blackboards bebe con conference last october this week, some raise money while some raise hell. I’m talking about women in philanthropy, with marshals to panic. She was founding editor in chief of contribute magazine and is the new media adviser to the new york university heimans center for philanthropy we’ll talk about limbong coleman leadership roles, traditional giving and how women are organizing themselves also, pinterest and slideshare amy sample ward returns she’s, our social media contributor and membership director of non-profit technology network and ten she shares how small and midsize non-profits can reap definite value from these lesser known social sites between the guests on tony’s take two, my podcaster on top i’ll tell you what i’m talking about, and i will thank you, my pleasure now, to welcome marshes to panic. She is new media advisor to the n u heimans center for philanthropy, and she also curates its annual speaker siri’s philanthropy three point oh, which explores disruptive innovation in the social good sector. It sounds like some organized anarchy. Anarchy pointed in the right direction. She teaches social media strategy. Yes, it may very well be totally okay. We’ll get teo talk about anarchy. I’m still trying to introduce you. Hold on there, marshal. She teaches social media strategy. You have a very lengthy bio. I was to get through this a cz well, a social enterprise. New media and cause video in the masters program at new york university she was, as i mentioned, founding editor in chief of contribute magazine, her upcoming book swarms. The rise of the digital antiestablishment published by little brown is due out later this year. And it’s actually because of that book that she couldn’t be in the studio because she’s interviewing someone for her book swarms very pleased to welcome marshes to panic. How are you? Thanks so much, tony. I’m just really delighted. Honored to be on yourself. Oh, it’s, my pleasure to have you. Thank you, marcia. Honored not too many people say that. Thank you. I hope you feel that way by the end you believe i’m sure you will. You believe that women are reshaping philanthropy? How is that what’s happening? Generally, you know, i didn’t use teo buy into claims that women somehow we’re you know, very different behaviorally and men in terms of their capacity for compassion and their willingness and generosity. But there’s some new research out and it’s very much triggered buy-in just in the economy and structural changes in the workplace that have given women a little more income over the last ten, twenty years, and since nine eleven, we’re we’re starting to see some measurable differences in the way women spend money in terms of the charitable contributions that they make, so that there are some differences that are starting to emerge here. There’s certainly other differences to in-kind of what those new income numbers are spawning in the non-profit industry, but armored and okay, and we’ll have time to talk about those, so you feel this is mostly economically driven? I think a lot of it is economically driven in terms of just the numbers with regard to the money uh given and how that those contributions different, for example, in the highest e-giving levels of people who give generally men and women, uh, baby boomer aged women are more likely to give them their male counterparts in all giving levels three percent or more, or they’re coming down to charity among people who do that. Male baby boomers and older, single headed households are nearly two times it’s, likely than men to give to charity. So that’s that says an age when most women are saving and have significant savings and disposable income and that’s even happening even as a result of women not getting paid is most statistically on the average than men. So it’s pretty significant. Okay, but there’s also interesting developments around organizing and advocacy. Yeah, very much so because of some of these economic trends, but also as a factor of globalization and particularly social media, technology and internet technology in general, we’re seeing some behavioral changes. First of all, it could be a simple as ah ah lot more charities targeting their solicitation campaigns more directly. Tau women. I know a lot of your listeners. Now, united way has now one hundred thirty seven women’s leadership councils that have raised something like nine hundred eighty five million dollars just over the left twelve years creating marshal those those leadership councils are our volunteers. They’re volunteermatch women supporters, yes, and doner groups. So what the united way has done? Uh, kind of piggybacking the general trend and women’s income and changing numbers and how much they’re spending on charity decided to tap into that trend and organize some of these councils. Teo, do more engagement around women’s not only volunteerism, but something like fund-raising as well and what’s. Interesting about that is, uh, this so called tiffany circle, which is an all female. Network created by the red cross, for example, another organization, uh hey has been started not just by the transport by social media networks that have popped up around some of these activities, so a lot of places they’re using a combination of social media and these economic trance really bolster their fundrasing activities, and we’re gonna have a chance to talk a little later on about women organizing themselves, not needing umbrella organization to do it. But, you know, around some of the controversies, like what happened to komen and rush limbaugh’s comments, and so we’ll get a chance talk about women organizing themselves, as i said, not even needing that kneading the big organization, but just coming together on the social sites let’s talk about some of the social change and social enterprises that you’re seeing women engaged in. Yeah, they’re concurrent with these other changes on certainly partly a factor of economic wealth. Growth among women is that a lot of women, particularly on wall street and other very in the financial services field, are really being a critical force behind the creation of pretty much a majority of social enterprises that are out there. The skull. Forum for, uh, global entrepreneurship has done on international study on this and seeing that at least half it’s not up to as high as seventy percent, and some regions of the new enterprises that have been started have been done by women, women who have earned independently of their thousands um uh, who are seeing that the needs community isn’t as fully developed as it ought to be around new issues of concern to these cohorts, such as women’s, self esteem, women and girls, self esteem, women, education issues. Now, these air getting much more focused thanks to a lot of the social enterprises on march for-profit businesses for good, if you will, that coming online. Also seeing a lot of female boomer women burned, creating films, getting into the social good film space and making some very interesting documentaries that are here about women helping women and trying to move the needle a little bit on education and their film initiatives that are also being used to raise a lot of money for certain non-profits abigail disney surely johnson, some of the big entrepreneurs are involved in these things on there, really successful in terms of measuring impact. Are there? Are there specific documentary titles? You khun you convention for us? Yes. Uh, shirley johnson made something about kicking the ball, which is about women’s basketball group. We’ve got abigail disney was working in liberia. Um, we’ve got some recent documentaries that are are being funded by again the women run fledgling fund, which is a foundation, and it’s about women and girls in the slums of calcutta being turned into activists and it’s a very compelling story. Uh uh, all sorts of new films i’m attending here to see for the first time i’m in washington, d c today as well, and i’m interviewing for the book as well as screaming some films that american university conference on social media that matters and this is focusing, i’m still making efforts. So again, you couldn’t you couldn’t be in the studio because you’re in washington, d c watching a movie that’s what you’re saying, i see a film, they have probably hard working the minute you’re seeing argo and lincoln, i’ll bet that’s why you’re in washington? Because they’re not playing in new york anymore, okay, we have just a minute before a break, so i don’t want to really get into anything brand new, too deep. But, of course, you’ll still be with me after the break. When and i want to make sure that what listeners understand, we talked about social enterprise, we’re talking about often cos right, that air, social, socially oriented, social good business is sort of. We’re talking about socially, social good enterprises that have been begun with the primary purpose now so much of raising money for stakeholders, but for raising the bar on social impact wielding an impact that’s measured first of those companies over organized to be accountable to those kinds of and our wii just very briefly before break, we necessarily talking about corporations or these could be not-for-profits also, these could be not-for-profits for-profit non-profit hybrid organizations and then for-profit organizations, but it’s the way that they’re organized on around what they promise to deliver, i understand what their outcomes are, not not necessarily one hundred percent profit, if there, if their profit mathos lately, okay, we’re going to take a break and when we return, of course, after this marchenese to panic stays with us, and i hope that you do, too, talking alternative radio twenty four hours. Are you confused about which died it’s, right for you? 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If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications. That’s, the hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com dafs welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I have to send live listener love. Now is the time let’s start anyway. Taipei, taiwan. Ni hao, changsha, china. Shanxi, china, hi bay, china. Beijing, china knee. How going out to china and taiwan, fork. Wacha, japan. Konnichiwa, and new bern, north carolina. What’s going on there. More live listener loved to come their arm or live listeners out there. Marcia yeah, let’s, let’s, talk a little about the a new organisation called the girl effect they have on there on the opening page of their website that what they say exactly, that women are the most powerful force for change on the planet. You what do you think about that? No, i got this. Let me say that hyperbole is shared by by because i was wondering how about even like, like men, maybe i don’t know they’re not a good food what’s interesting about the girl effect, though, is kind of the structure behind it, and we were just talking a moment ago about social enterprise and so forth. What the girl fact represents is is a really progressive and very successful partnership. Example of great collaboration in the do gooder space between the noble foundation, which is run by the bucket children warren buffett’s, kids corporation, nike and it’s ah it’s foundation arm and ah partnership with hundreds of non-profits that have it’s part of their mission statement helping women and girls to achieve change, whether it’s in the education space of the art stays or healthcare. It’s a partnership where ah, a very good shorts film was funded, its animation, but it basically finally connects. The dots taking it from hyperbole to show why funding women and girls projects actually affects everyone ah, and affects everyone in a very local way. And so it’s in a very effective messaging tool that kind of breaks through the the problems that a lot of these issues had had in the past, where it sounds awfully one sided, the girl fact does a wonderful job of making this ah, great messaging, peace around thie economic impact on everyone of the lack of educating women and girls, and some of the status around the world. Dahna uh, the lowly status love women hold around the world. So it’s it’s a great burger, and what it does is it kind of lends this little short film to a lot of organizations that couldn’t otherwise afford to make it and lets them put on their websites and interface that helps them to raise micro cash, you know, ten dollars, twenty dollars, right after people to do the film online, they’ve done ability, teo, donate to some of the causes that have been vetted. And though it’s just a wonderful campaign that is now finally being copied in other parts of the sector so we hope to see more of that kind of collaboration in the future. In fact, we’re seeing a lot of micro giving among women organizing themselves around social enterprise. Yes, we are a aa lot of this thie evolution of social networks, social media still relatively, very new, but as people get together and now they found each other online and now they exchange, you know, kind of information about the trivia are the important bits of their lives. Now, the next evolution is the first getting people together to make change or around certain issues folks i care about and what we’re starting to see is on what we saw a lot of last year were the social network, some of them that are very strong, many of them led by women being able to make a difference, either in defense of, uh, an action taken by an organization or to bring up some concerns that hadn’t been brought up otherwise and holding some of these traditional non-profit organizations accountable. And, of course, the the leading edge that was the komen foundation controversy where coming foundation had decided to be fund-raising goods breast cancer testing on dh without telling a lot of its membership, and when it finally freaked out, a lot of folks got online a lot of women and started protesting thiss was an example of women organizing themselves through the social networks and very rapidly yes, absolutely, and it was a very successful protest, and it wasn’t so much the significance here isn’t so much whether you believe that that decision was the right or wrong one it was looking, and there are social networks out there holding traditional organizations and non-profits accountable for their actions and ways that has never been before. And the rapid response of some of these networks to some of these decisions has really encouraged a lot of organizations to start really getting serious about engaging your supporters and their networks in new ways so that everybody does feel that their part of the decision making process and there is a new level of accountability achieved not only holding organizations accountable but individuals for there flippant and ah antagonistic, i’d say, remarks rush limbaugh, when he accused you really accuse nobody eats cited a law student was a prostitute because she wanted funding for birth control to be included. In health care and there was a huge backlash. Yeah, there was an internet firestorm over that in just three days. That firestorm was ableto porcelain about to apologize, not once but twice to the woman he had called a flat was the one of the quotes, okay? Ah, and he lost nearly one hundred advertisers right in that in that, uh napor so we’ve seen that these swarms, if you will, of the social networks that have been highly developed and that have a riel sustainability to them, are able to work very quickly when they’re organized. One of my colleagues, a friend of emmett has called these accountability networks actually because they’re social networks and they are always there, but they can get into action very quickly. Uh, if one of them are influential, members of these networks decides to call them into action. So it’s somethingto watch it’s a phenomenon now, but it’s becoming replicable, and we’re seeing a lot of this kind of action over. Yeah, and so this is what you’re calling swarms of women in this case and it’s not women, are not the only ones active actively engaging but that’s that’s the third today, but one of those air swarms saw another one very well done stop sopa campaign, but to delay a vote by the u s congress that would diminish him internet freedom, at least for now. And, uh, it’s, really a new form of activism that is used social media to coordinate swift action around the specific goal. And it’s it’s it’s significant because it’s, uh, much more to do with the ability of new players and the advocacy sector toe work collectively and successfully kind of outside the non-profit sectors long established structures fired-up alternative goals. So it’s it’s something that all organizations want to start infusing more with their supporters in new ways but also so constructively trying to really be able to prove that they’re having an immeasurable impact. A lot of donors now are saying, what have you done for us? We’re the cause lately, and a lot of organizations are now using the social media tools to measure impact, or at least to get a more specific numerical handle on the work that they are doing so that they are able to not only convince people of their value, but to be able teo create partnerships on new levels to achieve more social impact over time marchenese to panic is the new media advisor to the n u heimans center for philanthropy, and her upcoming book is will be swarms. The rise of the digital anti establishment, and you can follow marcia on twitter. She is at claw cause pardon me at cause global ah, marcia let’s, let’s focus a little more on the on the actual, more traditional e-giving and the way women are being more generous essentially than men, it’s a it’s a little more about that. Yeah, even though women in general are earning less than men and have less money in retirement and are generally outliving their spouses, these recent studies on their standing for charity demonstrate that young women, certainly, and especially boomer women, older women in particular are just more likely to give and to give more to charities and then beyond that, there’s, also a behavioral that women in a recent survey by indiana university also said that they they want teo uh, not just have more impact on spending. They want to be more involved in the decision making and indeed, a lot of the rise of some of these new organizations on social enterprises, uh, is due to women wanting to bypass, too simply writing a check to existing organizations but setting up a kind of a bee metrics around specific initiatives that they themselves want to see. And as long as they have the means and some of these new networks, especially on wall street and elsewhere, to accomplish that, they’ve been racing to set that up. That slowed a little bit during profession, but still a very vital force. A lot of people are saying that this income situation for women and this this habit of giving mohr, especially among older women, is very likely to continue. By twenty thirty, for example, fifty four percent of american boomers will be women. And because of their sheer numbers and the social changes that have occurred as they grew up, they have a significant impact on society through their beliefs and attitudes and behaviors and have us already. And so now, as they get older and more charitable on dh, i think we’re seeing the start of some more further behavioral changes among women towards charitable organization. So i think that’s a little bit of good. News you said earlier that the social networks are relatively young, but i hear people say how sick and tired they are a facebook or or twitter sometimes are these are these social networks with us forever? I think some forms of them are, and certainly is they morph and evolve our use of them well, morgan of all hope, the more distinctive things about social networks and social platforms that we’ve seen over and over again is that the people using them tend to define how going tio improve them over time. Ah, facebook, for example, everybody’s kind of getting organizations on facebook now so much personal things now that but seeing how they used them toe left bitch events and, you know, do pr in a different way, certainly, uh, we’re also seeing a rise in the use of private social networks, kind of a private facebook that go under certain names like ning’s o r other certain other platforms that are being set up so that it’s kind of like a private, charitable, uh, type of facebook that’s membership only on some organizations and non-profits they’re using this to great effect, one in particular is the provocative understand veterans organization? Marcia, marcia, you broke up a little bit, say they say the name of the organization again. It’s called i a v stand veterans iraq, afghanistan veterans association a okay, i look, they’ve dahna they set up a peer-to-peer private social network, uh, that bear as long as you’re in that network, you know, they don’t want this isn’t like vietnam veterans or korean, more veterans for eighteen, nineteen, twenty year old folks just and this particular war and are facing some very unique challenges, thanks largely to the health care technology being used to save them from injuries that in previous years killed and so there are unique challenges for them coming home and a lot of challenges always for veterans coming home. So combined with their existing use murcott given their age and their experience before going off to war ah, they are very successfully putting together these private networks is veterans to talk to each other, and they’re subsets like women’s subsets like people who were injured from a certain type of injury and you get on them by giving a password. You are pre qualified so you you it’s not just anybody, is not your fourth grade teacher finding you it’s a private conversation that built trust and credibility among the members and as it moves toward a membership model it’s also proving to be a very sustainable non-profit kind of model using social networks to serve those in need buy-in involving an engaged, those in need not just writing checks, marcia, just just a minute or so left, i have to ask you, what is it you love about this work and the and the research that you’re doing go how people, uh, can hold power accountable in new and constructive ways. I love how this technology couples to be advocacy sector e-giving voice teo so many more people who otherwise were not involved. These full social media, the, uh, the internet has democratized philanthropy, and in such is turning traditional organizations on their beer. I think it all about here. Social change, enormous empowerment absolutely marchenese to panic is new media advisor to the n u heimans center for philanthropy. Look for her book coming out later this year, swarms the rise of the digital antiestablishment it’ll be published by little, brown and she’s at caused global on twitter marsha thank you so much for being a guest, my honor and pleasure. Thanks, tony it’s. Been a pleasure having you right now. We will go away for a minute or two, and when we come back, it’s, tony’s, take two, and then amy sample ward is with me, and we’re going to talk about pinterest and slideshare stay with me. They didn’t think dick tooting getting ding, ding, ding ding. You’re listening to the talking alternate network e-giving. E-giving cubine are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Hi, i’m ostomel role, and i’m sloan wainwright, where the host of the new thursday morning show the music power hour. Eleven a m. We’re gonna have fun. Shine the light on all aspects of music and its limitless healing possibilities. We’re going invite artists to share their songs and play live will be listening and talking about great music from yesterday to today, so you’re invited to share in our musical conversation. Your ears will be delighted with the sound of music and our voices. Join austin and sloan live thursdays at eleven a. M on talking alternative dot com. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Schnoll i’m chuck longfield of blackbaud. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Hi there and welcome back. More live listener love! Montgomery, illinois. Tustin, california. Littleton, colorado. Atlanta, georgia. And two unidentified in somewhere in the united states of america. You’re masking your i p s we know who you are, i’m just since you’re masking, i won’t say who you are, but we know who you are. I’m just telling you that we know here you’re not you’re not you’re not hiding from us, but two unidentified on dh for our listeners in china, all those cities in china that are listening, i said earlier. Happy new year, gung hay fat choi also xero chou korea and seoul, korea on yo haserot it’s, time for tony’s take two, my podcasts are on top and i’m very grateful to you for that. This show was what’s hot in two categories on itunes very recently non-profits and government and organizations and my podcast that which is a monthly for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals. That was a top podcast in non-profits the’s honors are enormously fleeting. I don’t know, maybe they last five minutes, maybe their last an hour, but they go fast, so i took screenshots and you could see the photographic documentary evidence is on my blogged at tony martignetti dot com. But more important than that, i want to thank you for rating the show. We had the five hundred stars campaign. Thank you very much for raiding the show on itunes more than doubled the number of ratings and i’m sure that’s what made the show trend in itunes. And there was some carryover effect to the to the other podcast to the fund-raising fundamentals that i do. So i thank you. Um, my next guest would caution me that there’s more to true social engagement than numbers and and bumps and and peeks in listenership. So i i take that seriously there there was a lot more to that than engagement. But i thank you for being engaged to the level that you have been so far, and hope to get you even further along mohr, that on my block at tony martignetti dot com. And that is tony’s take two for friday, february fifteenth, the seventh show of this year amy sample ward she’s, the membership director at non-profit technology network. And ten her she co authored social by social, but even newer than that her very new book, also co authored, is social change any time everywhere with forward by two time guest on this show, craig marko is the founder of craigslist he’s been with us twice amy’s blawg is that amy sample, ward dot or ge and she’s on twitter at amy r s ward on twitter. That’s right? I’m going to finish the sentence without without without twitter id, and we know that the army’s rene amy rinascente ward welcome back. Thank you for having me. It’s a pleasure every month. I’m always surprised you allow me back every time. No, you shouldn’t be. I make you feel that in secure. I assume that there’s like a jargon jail downstairs. No, no, no, you’re you’re you’re pretty good about it. You’re quite good were very conscious of jargon jail amy’s here with her little field notebook it’s, an adorable little yellow forty eight page notebook. It’s branded from the state of texas. I don’t know. What were you in texas lately? Is that where you got your little fuel? No. It was given to me as a thank you by a friend, david jnf, who lives in austin. And i don’t even know why he was thanking me, but he gave me this little field notebook and it’s the perfect size it’s about phone sizes, let me ask you, you have co authored or contributed to five books by my count, when you’re going to do one on your own? Yeah, i’m hopeful that maybe that one is next, okay? And then there’s none of the like, you know, trying to interpret someone else’s edits like, for better or for worse, i could just come out of my brain and we’ll see what happens. It will be very, very much better. We’re looking forward to the solo effort, but we’ll celebrate your book coming up. In fact, i’m going to you’re going to one of your book launch events, which we’ll talk about later on act for the end later this month for those who are in the new york city area, but right now we’ll talk about pinterest and and slideshare um, how did these how do these fit into social change and social engagement? Well, i think that they’re really great examples of platforms that actually have tons of use, but organizations haven’t, for the most part translated how individuals air using that tool to how they as an organization would use it. You know, facebook’s pretty straightforward, you have an individual profile, you have an organizational page like you know, how to get started. But with these tools where there’s there’s, no difference between who the the user profile is, organizations are a little bit more, you know, without boundaries, there’s too many options, so they don’t really know how to engage. But organizations that have tried or are using the tools in part of their content strategy are really seen engagement there. I don’t know which one you want to talk about for just let’s talk about why don’t you explain what pinterest is? Because maybe so little known to some people that they don’t even know that exactly what it is? Sure, so pinterest is free to use social platform just like facebook or anything else where it is free to use, but that means you are than the product on and it’s very visual driven so it’s all about collecting on a pin board that’s virtual, just like you would maybe, you know, in your office pictures, recipes, anything on the web so whenever you pull in a block post, whatever images associated that block post would be actually what people see on your board, they wouldn’t see the block video also yet exactly. I have a pin board for women leaders of non-profits excellent on video, but it’s video zoho contributor of them speaking so just a quaint listeners that video can be as well. And then what you’ll see on that pin board if it’s videos would just be a screenshot, right like this still like you would when you had a youtube page and the video isn’t played ok? Yep. On dso you, khun, even though you have this pin board, you can actually have unlimited pin board, so maybe i have a pin board for conferences i want to attend, but then i also have a pin board like the most frequent one i see is recipes that i’m going to cook one day, but i’m never actually gonna cook like that whole sentence isn’t the title, but it’s like recipes and you know this person’s never cooking next i wish list. Recipe list. Exactly. All right. So how are charities? Engaging? Constituents were around around pinterest. Yeah, their organizations have you. Know, as you can imagine, tried different things, short campaigns, longer standing content and something that’s interesting, and i know you have the links to some infographics to share on the block. Pinterest has about eighty percent of that content is repent content. So anyway, you know, if i went to your pinterest board say, if it was the average boring, you know, think about hypothetical i would never i would never dane never squander my precious time with tony’s interest account because of pin boards are so mundane and superficial and dull, but if you if you stumbled on it buy-in accidentally, you clicked on it stumbles away there. Um, eighty percent of the content across pinterest is repent, meaning someone else pendant first, and you’ve just, you know, reposted on your on board, so but like you said, you’re, you’re bored that’s all about interviews with non-profit women leaders, i’m sure that you were the one that did that interview are or were some of the original? Yeah, so they’re going to show up all over pinteresque, but it’s because you were the source and so thinking about that at, like, how much content is shared amongst the platform where is very little of that content for people? Time is spent clicking on things, and i’m going to read websites. You know, i think organizations naturally think, well, this is, you know what has put up a bunch of great images to our website and we’ll drive a bunch of web site traffic, but that’s not the case, people are using the platform within that within the place. Yeah, so eighty percent are re pens? Yeah, that’s enormous. Yeah, do you have a corresponding stat for any buy-in a chance for twitter. How much of twitter is re tweets versus i? I don’t have a twitter for tumbler, which is a more similar platform to pinterest because it’s ah it’s like blogging but it’s much, you know, micro style and it’s about nine out of ten temblor posts are re blogged so it’s very similar in that way where people that are on the platform or just, you know, following each other and finding great things and it’s more a matter of like, i want to have the best curated recipe board versus the on ly recipe board, you know, so it’s it’s much more shared eso organizations are taking advantage of that in different ways. One one example that i really like. Because it’s very clearly aligned with the mission is city of hope, which is an l, a based a hospital research center, etcetera. They have a campaign called mushrooms for hope because mushrooms are shown to have really great health benefits, especially for people at risk of or with cancer. So they have a mushrooms for hope board that’s. All great ways, you know, recipes to use mushrooms, because we know everybody in there. Mom has a recipe board on pinterest. So why not, you know, curate all those different ways to use mushrooms so that people will re share it again in the platform and ultimately it’s, not about them knowing who city of hope is it’s about them eating mushrooms, right? You know, but they’re using that for exposure exact recipe sharing community. Exactly. Here’s a great super great cream of mushroom soup recipe. Right. Very smart. S o just to make it explicit. So people follow your boards, right? People can follow your whole board. They could also follow just you. And then whatever board here pinning tio, they could get those. Notifications or they could just never follow you and find your your pin through someone else, you know, and then see, allow just a great mushroom recipe, you know, and then click through. And actually the original post was was from your account i love those clever ideas that yeah, that shit’s a smart one. Yeah, another example of maybe not a specific example, but a way that, oh, our strategy for charities to engage on pinterest yeah, a different take on that that i i think is on interesting one is n w f national wildlife federation has a campaign for, you know, getting outside and and has a big, like camping go the great outdoor camp. I’m goingto mess up the name of their campaign, but so they have ah, aboard all about that where they’re pinning other people’s content about campaign so it’s not even their content, but again, it’s it’s making those people in the community that are talking about the campaign feel like they’re in the spotlight because this is a board of all those other people talking three national organization has exactly exactly bored or my my my pen? Yeah, exactly. Engagement. Yeah, exactly. Two way street let’s. Talk about slideshare. Sure. Because always shoot. There was something i want to ask you about. Interest. It’s, overwhelmingly women. Yes. I see different statuses. Somewhere, anywhere between two thirds tow. The mashable said maybe it’s this high is ninety seven percent. So somewhere in there, overwhelmingly women. What should we be capitalizing on that? What should we be doing with that? Yeah, i think part of just to address the point, you’re making that all the numbers being a little different. And part of that is if it’s actual user sign ups versus active users and again, different platforms in different data. Analysts consider active user as, like logs in once a month or is on it for an hour a day like which one of those is active, you know? And once you get wherever you fall in that active definition scale that’s where it starts skewing much more women. So actual user accounts are a little bit more typical of social networks, but the active is much more female. Okay on. And so i think organizations can take advantage of that in those are, you know, the examples where two shared but also just remembering that, you know, even like marcia was saying women want to be making the decision of where money goes, women want to be, you know, figuring out the causes that they care about and engaging with them, so figuring out ways that isn’t just, um, you know, a generic call to action for everyone, but you’re figuring out, what are the the women boomers in your community interested in doing? And maybe it has it it’s not, you know, all about city of hope and all about all of the life saving measures and research ugo but it’s about mushrooms, you know, and you like, let that be the thing for them? S o i think really, figuring out who your community is back to some of the stuff we’ve talked about in previous months and then focusing really specifically and letting them either drive that content and you’re just re, you know, you’re collecting that o r just taking their lead? Excellent, we’re goingto take a short break, and when we come back, amy sample ward stays with me, we’re going to talk about slideshare stay with me, too. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Schnoll are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. And you, sample ward, is our eyes, our social media contributor and our social media scientist. I doubled that id number that she’s too modest to say that i did that on dh. We’re talking about slideshare what let’s acquaint listeners. What is slideshare great? So slideshare is ah ah, platform, where you can post content that you want to share and it’s called slideshare because it’s it’s most prominent feature is posting slides like a power point presentation or a slide deck that you would be using in a, you know, at a conference are in a board meeting or whatever for count for mac users, or use kino exactly like, you know. And then i translated over the power point, exactly little little parenthetical for mac users. Or what does whatever google aps calls there? Oh, yeah. Anyway, so that’s that’s, the most dominant features people posting slides and you can find them and review them and share them. But you can also embed them. And so you could post slides from your conference and then on your blogged have them embedded so people, you’re not just having to write out what you said. You khun embed it right there and people can flip through the slides. But what’s great is that you can also use it for all kinds of content. So do you use your organization? Is part of your new campaign launching, you know, with an infographic about why you’re running this campaign? Well, you could upload that info graphic, you know as a pdf or whatever to two slideshare embedded in your block. Have people share it just like they do. Slides and track track the shares that way. Okay, you know, if you wished you could also use that info graphic on pinterest. Exactly. Okay, on dh that and you know that goes for all kinds of other content. Maybe you have a new orientation, you know, to sheet that you give to your volunteers, will. You could post it there and then also post slides that you’re goingto review with them of this is how to be a volunteer for our organisation. This is what we do, this is why we have volunteers. This is what the volunteer job looks like, and that way you could just send them those two links they don’t have to download anything they don’t have to, you know, have have any special software, whether they’re on the phone or they’re you know, on a computer they could read or digest those materials ahead of time, show up and be ready to volunteer, and you don’t have to be emailing large files were about exactly top box or some other bright, just a link exactly. Now i’ve so in a few places slideshare called youtube for slide shows. Yes, it’s not as anyone here is popular as youtube. Well, yeah, definitely not as popular as you tube in that when you look at youtube stats, basically, you would think humans do nothing but watch youtube video that there really is a ridiculous thing. So so slideshare has about three billion views a month, so that’s still sized amglobal yeah, yeah, and and i think something social. Engagement is not just in the numbers, though, right? And i think something that’s interesting as faras actual of what the numbers say is that of all of the different social platforms facebook, youtube, whatever slideshare is foreign away, much more popular amongst business owners, organizational leaders, you know, executive level staff of different kinds of organization. So hyre go ahead. So i was just going to say, you know, if you want to make sure that you spent a lot of time preparing something for some funders that you were going to meet with, you know, you made the slide deck showing them who you are made it really clear the impact you make. Why not post that for free on a platform where other, you know, leaders in the sector could come across your sides and say that’s? Exactly. We’ve been looking for someone like you to partner with exactly, and what i was saying, slideshare is owned by linked in. Yeah. So not surprising that it’s i guess it’s gravitated toward business and you can you can embed slideshare content in your personal yet or your or your organizational linked in page yet? Yep. You khun just connect them on dh from from your linked in profile, and it’ll even just automatically pull in your most recent slides or uploads, you know, if you were doing something else so all a very easy way to embed large what maybe large files? Because especially if you’re doing power point or keynote and you have video and or there’s photos in each slide yeah, very large, you get those very large files other other ways, you know, just ask you generally other ways that charity’s could be using slideshare or other tips that you have for for engaging through slideshare well, i think that the training is really what what i’ve seen organizations do well with most often is there already creating training materials, whether it’s for volunteers, it’s for a certain department, you know, and using slideshare is away too. Put those up there, how’s them for free, you know, think about it like youtube, where even though you’re goingto use that video for your campaign or in your marketing and you’re going to embed that video on your website, you’re still going to post it on youtube so that all that organic traffic that could maybe come across it can still come in. And so posting those materials about, you know, the great things that you’re doing with social media at your organization and here’s, you know, kind of your overviewing training materials than other people that are interested in either your organization or social media in general could find that come to you and say, great, i want to get involved with your efforts, so i think thinking about it as the place you know, like youtube, where you, you how’s the content even though you’re using it elsewhere because you still just get the benefit from the other platform. And as google and other search engines index the the content that’s in your slides, it’s, sort of a wayto ona ona niche because you’re you’re slideshare going too, so dense with key notes that are just i mean, i’m sorry keywords that are necessarily embedded in there because it was part of your part of your presentation. Yeah, way of sort of owning a very narrow niche that your expert well and it’s it’s great for search engine optimization, you know, they’re one of their three highest sources is organic google searches so if i am, you know, working on a proposal for these are the five strategies for ending homelessness in new york city, and i’m pitching this to some thunders, and i want to find you know what? I’m going to start a coalition post it there because if someone else is looking just on a search for how do we end homelessness in new york city? And they get to my presentation now, i’m i’m creating credibility for myself and setting up our organization as the leader on that cause. Any sample ward should membership director at non-profit technology network and ten her new book is social change anytime everywhere, and i am going to a february twenty eighth book launch at five thirty at, which is at the planned parenthood federation quarters. You want to say a little about how people can can attend that if they’re if they’re in the new york city area? Yes, i think if you go to social change any time dot eventbrite, dot com something i will come. We started your blogged way started any sample ward dot or yes, i will put it up there. It’s not up there now, okay? Or put it. On the show’s facebook page, facebook page and lengthen group grayce forget linked in okay, yes, but that happens to be on february twenty eighth at five thirty, yes, and we’ll have books to sell but also will be doing a presentation just about ten, really tactical tips that people can take away from it, too. I’m gonna be there. I’m gonna see how many other people think you’re the social media scientists like i do think, of course, thanks for having me pleasure, my thanks also to martius to panic. More live listener love philadelphia p a you joined us a little bit late, but welcome next week. J love, ceo of bloomerang we’re going talk about donorsearch tension, you know that it’s, much cheaper and easier to keep a donor than to replace one j love has insights to help you, and that might actually have something to do with engagement using the social networks. Somebody should write a book about that and maria semple, the prospect finder and our prospect research contributor, returns she’s our doi n of dirt cheap and next week maria has to free sites to help you get serious with prospect research natural. You’re gonna have to listen and a reward we’re listening this long, and staying at the podcast is far i’m giving away two, three hundred forty nine dollars one year subscriptions to the atlas of giving remember rob mitchell was on a couple of weeks ago atlas of giving you khun benchmark your own giving get custom reports through this three hundred forty nine dollars value. One live listener one podcast right now live listener go to pick a platform, but i’m on facebook go to facebook! Go to the shows, facebook page and post i’m listening live to non-profit radio first person who does that on the facebook page gets one these three hundred forty nine dollars subscriptions and first podcast listener who does that? Also on facebook? I’m listening to the podcast of non-profit radio you will also win. Our creative producer was claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is our line producer shows social media is by regina walton of organic social media and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. I hope you’ll be with me next friday one to two p m eastern at talking alternative dot com finding things to getting ding, ding, ding ding. You’re listening to the talking, alternate network waiting to get in. Duitz nothing. You could hi, i’m donna, and i’m done were certified mediators, and i am a family and couples licensed therapists and author of please don’t buy me ice cream are show new beginnings is about helping you and your family recover financially and emotionally and start the beginning of your life will answer your questions on divorce, family court, co parenting, personal development, new relationships, blending families and more dahna and i will bring you to a place of empowerment and belief that even though marriages may end, families are forever join us every monday, starting september tenth at ten a m on talking alternative dot com are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications? Then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s two one two seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way look forward to serving you! You’re listening to talking alt-right network at www. Dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays, one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting are you fed up with talking points, rhetoric everywhere you turn left or right? Spin ideology no reality, in fact, its ideology over in tow no more it’s time. Join me, larry shop a neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven easter for the isaac tower radio in the ivory tower. We’ll discuss what you’re born you society, politics, business and family it’s provocative talk for the realist and the skeptic who want to know what’s really going on? What does it mean? What can be done about it? So gain special access to the ivory tower. Listen to me very sharp your neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven new york time go to ivory tower radio dot com for details. That’s, ivory tower radio dot com e every time i was a great place to visit for both entertainment and education. Listening. Tuesday nights nine to eleven. It will make you smarter. Told you.

110: Abbondanza Alliances and Claires Cliches – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Rosanna Imbriano, principal of RI Consulting and contributor to “Big Bold Business Advice from New Jewsey Womeon Business Owners”

Claire Meyerhoff, principal of The Planned Giving Agency and creative producer of Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

View Full Transcript
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Zoho dahna oppcoll hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for your for the other ninety five percent. I’m the aptly named host. Oh, do i hope you were with me last week? I’d be in distress if i learned that you had missed last week’s show, which started with small shop planned e-giving claire meyerhoff is the principle of the plan giving agency and this show’s creative producer. We talked about marketing gift planning in ways that are not same old, same old for small and midsize charities. Claire turned the tables and interviewed me at last year’s national conference on philanthropic planning and last week events technology, scott koegler was with me to help you with event planning, he shared free tools to collaborate with the volunteers, employees and vendors who were putting your events together. Scott is our regular technology contributor and the editor of non-profit technology news this week aban danza alliances roseanna imbriano a true italian and principle of our eye consulting encourages you to secure strategic alliances that expand your marketing and save your marketing budget because they cost you nothing and claire’s cliches. Claire meyerhoff returns two weeks in a row it’s too much already she’s, principal of the plan giving agency on dh, still creative producer of this show this week, she’s got cliches, plenty of cliches for you to avoid and simpler words to replace them. Jargon. Jail is sure to be overcrowded this week between the guests on tony’s take to my block this week is seven tips for small shop planned e-giving. I don’t think that requires any explanation. Are you on twitter while you’re listening? If you are, use the hashtag non-profit radio to join our conversation at this moment, we take a break, and when we returned roseanna imbriano and a bonanza alliances stay with me. They couldn’t limp dick, dick tooting, getting thinking, you’re listening to the talking alternative network, itching to get anything. E-giving, you could joined the metaphysical center of new jersey and the association for hyre awareness for two exciting events this fall live just minutes from new york city in pompton plains, new jersey, dr judith orloff will address her bestseller, emotional freedom, and greg brady will discuss his latest book, deep truth living on the edge. Are you ready for twelve twenty one twelve? Save the dates. Judith orloff, october eighteenth and greg brady in november ninth and tenth. For early bird tickets, visit metaphysical center of newjersey dot, or or a h a n j dot net. Hi, i’m donna, and i’m done were certified mediators, and i am a family and couples licensed therapists and author of please don’t buy me ice cream are show new beginnings is about helping you and your family recover financially and emotionally and start the beginning of your life. Will answer your questions on divorce, family, court, co, parenting, personal development, new relationships, blending families and more. Dahna and i will bring you to a place of empowerment and belief that even though marriages may end, families are forever. Join us every monday, starting september tenth at ten a m on talking alternative dot com. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent with me now is roseanna imbriano. She is a marketing strategist and consultant, she’s, the owner of our consulting, which you’ll find it r ight consulting llc dot com she is past president of the essex chapter of new jersey association of women business owners and his marketing director for the center for italian and italian american culture. Mary-jo no, senora, welcome, amjad no, tony, actually bump a gritty joe. Oh, i’m stumped already. What does that mean? Good. I mean, good afternoon. Okay. Thank you. I said, well, good one, john doe is ok. Can i use that? Anytime? Of course. Okay. There’ll be plenty of opportunities for you to correct me, so don’t don’t don’t jump it small, small things that i get the half right. Well, you’ve already tagged me as a true italian, so i have to live with that. All right, all right. We’re talking about strategic alliances. Abbondanzieri, alliances. What is your definition of a strategic alliance? Ah, a strategic alliance. Our two entities that are committed to each other’s success. It’s that simple. That simple. Okay, what do they what sort? Of things, do they do they do together? What? Where they committed to each other’s success. Well, uh, first of all, because it’s beneficial to both of them, uh, you want to start when you’re dealing with a non-profit teo, look at where are their supporters coming from eyes their common thread. Is there something that is unique to both of them? And you start to develop a plan of what do they need to do together? What are their goals? What? What were they looking to accomplish? Okay, so i put it down on paper. Okay, so we’re starting to look. We’re sorry. Look, for commonalities, something in common maybe could be same constituency could be related. Work would be one’s work and maybe one’s interest in in joining that work. But they’re not currently doing it. Would that be acceptable, partner? Yes, acceptable. Someone whose mission statement is similar. Okay, i pulled the listeners before the show and asked, have you looked outside your organization for other charities or cos you can ally yours with? And i think it’s very positive. One hundred percent said yes, they have done that. And the other option was no, i better listen to the show, hopefully people other than the survey listeners are listening to the show because it is only that i mean the survey completed because it was only a survey complete er’s then they wouldn’t be listening to the show unless they wanted to get even more than just strategic alliances from it. So hopefully there’s other people, but i’m sure there are no yes, and it also is that maybe those people who actually doing things on and have developed these strategical lines can do it more efficiently. They want to learn more exactly it’s where they’re listening to the show. What? What a business development person you are for me. Thank you. So now we have identified that we can save some money at this too. These don’t need to be costly, right? Yes. It is a miss in the marketing community. Uh, that in order to create business or create revenue, you need to throw money at marketing. Okay, you don’t really have to spend thousands of dollars. Some of it is right underneath your nose in terms of developing business, it’s just a different way of thinking outside the box. And so for little. Or no money. We can also get sort of ah, multiplier effect, because you’re going to be learning and gaining from your your alliance partner correct, i have actually had non-profits i’m working with or have worked with in the past that have increased their donations, or they’re giving ten percent with a one strategic alliance, okay? And but of course, it doesn’t end with increased giving. You could maybe increase volunteers or maybe gained new board members, right? I mean, there’s other things besides just giving go ahead so well in the nonprofit world, we’re always looking to do a lot more with less, and we all know that if you have been in non-profit you know that especially in these economic times, so you’re trying to think outside the box of what can you d’oh? How can you multiply your success? Whether it’s having people attend an event, whether it’s donations, whether its membership, um, there’s so many different ways and you can have strategic alliances in different areas, they don’t necessarily all have to result in just donations. So that’s the in the box thinking you need to step out of the box. Okay, so are there. Other things than the ones i mentioned that could be gained from a strategic alliance. Yes, um for instance, who you definitely have membership. You have donations. You have attendance at different events from you. If you’re doing a huge fundraiser, uh, and you want to have two hundred people that will how do you get for hundred people there? So it’s it’s different things that you want to look at? You wantto align yourself with maybe a different venue vendors that air providing services to the non-profit different other organizations that have the same mission statement. It’s endless. Okay, okay, way have just about a minute before a break. So why don’t we just start to talk about how do you start to find these partners? And then we’ll take a break and continue it. Okay, what i usually do when i’m working with non-profits has asked them where their supporters are coming from and kind of get a baseline of what they’ve done in the past and what they haven’t tried. And then then i go a little bit further and then start to do the creative part. Okay, the that thinking beyond what they’ve been doing, correct. Okay, all right. We’re going to take our break when we returned. La senora, the true italian. Rosana imbriano stays with me, she’s, a marketing strategist and consultant, and we’re going to continue talking about strategic alliances. Stay with us, talking alternative radio, twenty four hours a day. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna are you fed up with talking points, rhetoric everywhere you turn left or right? Spin ideology, no reality, in fact, its ideology over in tow, no more it’s time, join me, larry shot a neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven easter for the ivory tower radio in the ivory tower. We’ll discuss what you’re born, you society, politics, business and family. It’s, provocative talk for the realist and the skeptic who want to know what’s, really going on. What does it mean? What can be done about it? So gain special access to the ivory tower. Listen to me, larry sharp, your neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven, new york time go to ivory tower radio dot com for details. That’s, ivory tower radio, dot com e every time i was a great place to visit for both entertainment and education. Listening. Tuesday nights nine to eleven it will make you smarter. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com wait! Duitz honey. Way i see the marquis. Miree tim that’s not booker t and the mgs that is michael castaldo, he’s singing brooch piela terra the theme from the godfather the reason i decided to play that is because michael introduced metoo roseanna and i wanted teo give a shout to michael. You can hear more of his music at michael castaldo dot com sabelo j c senora altum piela sabelo chairman’s what a beautiful grayce voice, of course, let’s see, i’m all i’m all a flutter now with different music. I’m i’m used to booker t and the mgs singing jelly jelly jelly roll okay, way. We’re talking about how you start too find the strategic partners are going to be that are going to be with an alliance with you. So how do we how do we get started with that? Well, we definitely have tio have a baseline when i’m working with a new non-profit you need a baseline, you need to know what they’ve done in the past and what they have not tried, according to to the strategy i implement with them and start to look at, uh, alliances that they currently have and then look at alliances that they may need to. Develop uh, i am definitely in the frame of mind to understand and teo latto isolate that this doesn’t does not need to be a process in which you need to spend a lot of money to do. You may spend the money in furthering relationships, but not necessarily to develop them on. And then once you’ve identified, you know and you’ve identified a partner, you want to know what their goals are, what goals are what your goals are. Wait, let’s, not go let’s, not go too fast. We still have to need some help identifying the right partners. You and of course, a consultant could be indispensible for this. But there are small charities that may need to do it on their own. I would think networking is a part of trying to find the right organization, right? You want to be out there in the community? Absolutely. You want to have a very professional web presence? Some of the charities that i have work with, uh, have excellent websites. Very easy to use. Very that you can maneuver and find them very easily. They have very clear, clean look, help them. Whatever makes the process simple and if you make it difficult for feeding people to find you, they’re not going to find you, obviously, and and while they’re looking for you, you could be out on the web looking for for for partners as well. How would that research where’s that research look like? Well, it depends on, you know, again identifying what you’re looking for, that’s half the battle on, once you identified the type of person that the type of alliance that you want, then it makes it easier to search the web, of course, okay, and we’ve been talking about outside partners, but this you could have an alliance with people that are already known to you, they’re just they’re not sure how to how to help you write direct or they’re not sure how to help you. So when you have these partners, they act as an advisory board as a board of directors that can help you grow your business and buy-in versa. Okay, i got to send some live listener love out. Troutdale, oregon welcome carrollton, texas welcome, dalton, georgia. Welcome, welcome live listener love going out to the pacific northwest. This and the south, mid and southeast. You talked? A little about goals. What might some of our goals of these strategic alliances b the goal for any non-profit of courses is donation worships? Uh, getting people out to events, tendencies if you have a gal, a golf outing and you have no one that comes so you know, it makes it’s no use or if you’re promoting that gal thought in three weeks before the event it’s not working, but if you take your database and within the database, you have organizations that you are aligned with that have, um, you know, an email database of ten thousand each, then multiplied your success. Okay, right. So, there’s, your multiplier, because you’re going to be sharing marketing in your example, you’re going to be sharing marketing with them, and they’ll be sharing with you and correct there’s, your there’s, your multiplayer. Okay, those of course, our relationships that are concrete that are developed and there’s a win win for both parties, right? What? So now, how do you translate some of your goals or your specific goals for the alliance into the right strategic alliance partners? Well, because you’re you’re going to determine what the goal is for both. Parties, you’re going to determine what are what are both parties looking to get out of the relationship? And is it feasible? Okay, i’m going to evaluate that over a period of time. But, i mean, as you’re doing your research to try to find the right partners, how do you go from the goal of, you know, we want more people at our golf outing next year to finding the partners that are going to help you do that to researching, you know, finding the right potential partners, right? You’re going to see if you can find the people who are commited the people who are have a vested interest in your organization in your mission and may be a partner for that particular event. A corporation, you know, a donor aa sponsor. Okay. Okay. Um and when we have identified the right alliance partner or partners, then i assume there’s some negotiation that goes on, say little about that. Yeah, you want tio? I don’t get too involved in the process. What i’d like to do is basically to write the goals down and tow. Have both parties sign it so that we know six months from now. What have we committed to and what was your portion of the deal? And what is my portion of the deal and agreed to that? Because over a period of time, people tend to forget what they promised each other, right, so and then evaluated. Okay on, we’ll get to those steps, but but the process of negotiating what’s going to be in the agreement, you know, you’ve got to give some i’ve got to give some and there’s just going, tio, we’re trying to accomplish i’m sorry. So based on what gold both parties are trying to accomplish, okay, right? And now you said you like to see this in a assigned writing should both parties actually be signing this? I believe that you should have the commitment. Yes, my my attitude has changed quite a bit over the last couple of years on that tony on ly because, like i said, i people have short memories. Sounds like you got your client’s got screwed is what you’re saying. Well, now, you know they’ll say, well, now i didn’t promise you that. Well, yes, you did. Uh, people forget what they always sit down when you’re having a meeting. And people forget so a one page document of both parties. Responsibilities signed by both parties, i think, makes more sense. Okay. And isn’t usually the executive director seo’s that you see having these conversations or is it somewhere lower or board level? What, depending on mott non-profits it’s usually the executive director? Yes. Okay. Okay. And of course, there’s an important something else you touched on evaluation, of course. So you say something about evaluating this? Well, in order for this strategic aligns tow work, both parties have to be committed. It has to be a win win if one party is winning and the other one is losing than over a period of time. It’s just going to fall apart. So you want to make sure that you evaluated every three months hyre so that neither one of the parties is wasting too much time. If the alliance is not working or if the alliance is working, just how do how do we make it work more efficiently? Okay, so we’ll go back to that written document and evaluate based on that correct and then makes the adjustment. Okay? And we can’t be afraid. Teo cut ties when things aren’t going so well, correct? There is not working for either party. It really is not it’s a waste of time and money. Okay. You have, ah, client example of successful alliance that you want to share. Yeah, actually. For the non-profit i am currently involved with, uh, which is the centre for italian? Italian american culture is an organization that has been in existence twenty one years. Um, i been in my position for the last three and a half. Last year. We were able to produce for our annual fundraiser events seventy two thousand dollars in one night. Okay. And that was significant increase, i assume, over past years, correct. It was one of the most successful in twenty one years. Okay, so it’s, not like the year before was seventy one thousand five hundred. Okay, we probably took it to the point where we did double or tripled. Um, the success. Okay. Okay. I pulled listeners for their own success around strategic alliances. And about eighty five percent said either they’ve done this either very successfully or somewhat successfully. About fifteen percent said no, not not so successful. What? What problems have you seen that we can help listeners overcome onda void when you’re developing these alliances, they both parties need to be committed. Okay, sometimes you have situations in which one party is not as committed as the other, and so there’s sort of an imbalance there. So even though even though they commit, they’re not really committed, correct? They make promises, they don’t promise, they promise and don’t deliver. Yeah, okay. Okay. So how do you how do you make sure that you’re alliance partner is serious. Ah, well, you start by choosing the right partners. It’s, just like a marriage. You start by choosing the right partner, right band. If if if. If you’re not choosing the right partner from the beginning, it really makes no difference how much effort of time or money you’re putting into it. It’s really not gonna work? So, exactly. But how do we do? Make sure that we’re getting the right partner, like instinct and research of you know what? What’s your advice around, making sure we got that right, partner. You have to kind of feel it out. It’s every every relationship is different. Every it depends on whether it’s a new relationship or something that has been there’s a history there. You have to really evaluate each individual situation is different, but you want to trust your gut instinct if your instinct for me it’s instinct, not for a lot of other people, i can pretty much read whether the relationship is going to work or not work for the non-profit or a client. Okay. On dh. Probably a good idea to maybe start small in your alliance. Start with a smaller project to do together is what i mean, something like that. Something maybe that works that way. But there many times, like in your particular industry, finding a person who has ah, ah, lot of money that they want to donate to a tower charity would be wonderful. Uh, and you know, something like that. How do you start small? You really don’t it’s a person who either want to do it or they don’t. So it’s. Very simple, simple process and my job as a consultant to these entities, there’s, just to make the process simple for both parties. Okay. Um rosanna, why don’t you share with us? What? What is what is it that you that you really love about bringing? The right parties together what really moves you about this work? Okay, we’re fortunate to live in the united states of america where non-profits thrive and that there’s a non-profit so for every mission, every possible issue out there and what what brings me the satisfaction i had for many years and continue to have a client who every christmas donates to annoy organization called oasis in patterson, and the client donates thousands of dollars every year to this non-profits the women and children could have a wonderful christmas, which they wouldn’t ordinarily have. And for me, those kind of matching up people to for a greater good is really what i live for. Ok? And how long have you been doing this work? I’ve actually been doing this all my life, but in my own business for about twelve years. All right, now you contributed to a book by new jersey women business owners. Why don’t you tell people what? What about that book and where they can find it? Okay, the book is called jersey women mean business. The big both business advice from new jersey business women owners, business owners. I’m sorry. And they could get the book at. Uh uh. Woodpecker, press dot com www dot woodpecker press dot com it is a compilation of seventy two business women across the state of new jersey. It was the brainchild of the publisher, dahna thompson. Yeah. To bring all these business women and their expert teeth to the economy and to grow the economy. Okay. Now all the contributors are not italian, though, are they? They are not, but added seventy two, we have about twenty one, twenty two women that are italian in italian american descent. Dahna third. Okay. That’s pretty good. Right? Was still still recommend the book. Okay? Yep, yep. Way. Okay, you’ll find that it woodpecker press dahna dahna thompson, by the way, is italian american. So is our editor, joyce christine. Oh, and our graphic design who person? Richelle bonem isa. So all these women together are a force to be reckoned with. Okay, alongwith you. Rosana imbriano is a marketing strategist and consultant. You’ll find her at our eye consulting. L l c dot com assume our eyes is not rhode island. That’s who’s on imbriano. Okay, it’s. Quite a coincidence. If you were in rhode island that we even better. That would be even roseanna, thank you very much for being against tony is my pleasure, it’s, always a pleasure to spend some time with you, and i think what you’re doing for non-profits is is a tremendous asset said in that industry. Oh, thank you, thank you so much, although buttering me up is not going to get you on the show. So it’s too late for that, but thank you for your kind words. I’ve gotta send live listener love, teo, somerset, new jersey, mountain view, california. Cool rest in virginia, all these different states, i love it, live listener, love out, tio, california, virginia and new jersey, where rosana imbriano was from stay with me. And when we returned, it’s tony’s, take two, and then claire’s cliches. Told you. Hi, this is nancy taito from speaks been radio speaks been radio is an exploration of the world of communication, how it happens in how to make it better, because the quality of your communication has a direct impact on the quality of your life. Tune in monday’s at two pm on talking alternative dot com, where i’ll be interviewing experts from business, academia, the arts and new thought join me mondays at two p m and get all your communications questions answered on speaks been radio. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com how’s your game want to improve your performance, focus and motivation? Than you need. Aspire, athletic, consulting, stop second guessing yourself. Move your game to the next level, bring back the fun of the sport, help your child build confidence and self esteem through sports. Contact dale it aspire, athletic consulting for a free fifteen minute power session to get unstuck. Today, your greatest athletic performance is just a phone call away at eight a one six zero four zero two nine four or visit aspire consulting. Dot vp web motivational coaching for athletic excellence aspire to greatness. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business, why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com if you have big ideas and an average budget tune into the way above average tony martin any non-profit radio ideo, i’m jonah helper from next-gen charity. Welcome back, it’s, time for tony’s take two at roughly thirty two minutes into the hour. My block this week is seven tips for small shop planned e-giving and i want to focus on just the very first one of those seven, which is you don’t have to be big to be successful at planned e-giving lots of opportunity in planned giving for small shops you basically to start with big quests or iras or something that’s, just simple for people to understand and easy for them to execute and that’s very common in people’s lives like a will or like an ira or a pension, and you just encourage people to include your charity buy-in one of those methods, you don’t have to have expertise and sophistication either on your board or as consultant, or even now in your development staff. I just want to break down the the perception and the myth that you have to be a big shop to be successful in plant e-giving it’s just not so, and there are six other tips for small shop planned e-giving on my block, which is that tony martignetti dot com and that is tony’s take two for friday, september twenty first, the fortieth show of the year. Now at the break, i had a text message. Someone requested that i play mala femina which again, my bad italian. But i’m gonna soon. Mala femina means bad lady and here’s our bad lady clare markoff climb arika half. How are you? Welcome. Hi, tony. Thanks for having me on the show. It’s. My pleasure always to have you back. Claire’s, of course, principal of the plant e-giving agency and she’s, creative producer of this very show. And this week we’re talking about claire’s cliches. Why are cliches bad, claire? Well, cliches, they’re bad because they’re old and they’re tired and they’re worn out and when you’re a non-profit trying to inspire people to volunteer for your cause, care about your cause and especially donate money your cause then you’re writing should not be tired and worn out. It should be fresh and vibrant and draw you in ok, but these air phrases that we phrases and sometimes just single words that we all understand that is a is a common understanding, even if there may be a little wordy. What’s what’s the problem with everybody, you know, if you’re using something that everybody, everybody grasps easily, well, you know, it depends on every single situation, so in some situations, when you have no time to think and you’re in a real hurry and, you know, a cliche is what comes to mind? Well, yeah, then just, you know, spit it out and use it and if your audience is, you know, inspired by that word great, but for the most part, what i find is that when people do use cliches and these air things like, you know, staying ahead of schedule or, you know, there’s millions of them and we’ll go through a list, but when people use cliches often times it’s just because they were in a habit, right? It’s a habit of using it and a lot of times what it signals to me is that if you’re in, like, a habit of using these phrases over and over, like, make a difference, make a difference, maybe it’s time for something new, and perhaps you need to re think your entire communications system and what you’re doing and what you’re telling people if you’re falling back all the time on cliches and jargon, okay, i assume you would you also would argue for economy of words, maybe using fewer words sometimes to say the same thing. Like you said the example you gave forget which phrases but another one at the present time or something you like. You like it exactly, because tony, think about how most people learn how to write you learn how to write when you’re in school, especially when you get to college so your college freshmen and you have to turn in a paper and the teacher wants fifteen pages. So as you write, you’re just like your so effusive you do just like all these words come out of you because, you know, gosh, i’ve gotta fill up fifteen page if i need to sound smart and important, so you start writing like that. But then when you get to the real world, not that many people are looking for a fifteen page paper from you’re either a five page paper from you, bennett, he needs five words from you write like a really nifty thing on a twitter or facebook or or in a postcard or something that you’re sending to your donors just a few lines to really? Did someone excited about something? It’s, not a fifteen page paper, even a two page paper. So economy aboard is really, really important to sort of change your whole mindset from that writing for writing sake to writing for, you know, being exciting and being interesting and really making your point in in a clear way that paints a picture in the person’s mind, okay? And you’re not being paid by the word. No, you’re not being paid by the word, not at all. A matter of fact, you should be thanking yourself is being paid for the fewer words, maybe you get a bonus instead of getting paid like, you know, ten cents a word instead, you’re getting paid like you know, one hundred dollars if you khun, if you could do it in half the words or something, if you think about if you think about okay, you want you want charity clarity, right? Hey, that’s! Good. I like that charity clarity. Okay, cool. You’re always pointing new phrase change one letter. I know charity clarity school alright. Came up with one the other day with one of my clients at the national wildlife federation and we had something that at first seemed terrible. This thing happened right with the letter we were sending out, and we thought it was a terrible thing. But then, all of a sudden, we realize, wait a minute, maybe that’s. Not a bad thing to think that through. And so the phrase we came up with horror and hope. Of course, i’m a fan of alliteration, ze mean, we’re here talking about claire’s cushions, so horror dankmyer strikes, right, right? Uh, right. So what? You’re gonna run time with something you think? Well, maybe there’s hope in this first you’re horrified, but maybe there’s, hope, horror and hope. Um, let’s. See? So your your interest in this goes back because you’re old radiohead, u did radio journalism? I mean that’s ah, you got to be concise in radio journalism, don’t you? Absolutely and that’s where? That’s where i come from, i’m a non-profit girl through and through mostly and fund-raising especially with plan giving, marketing and that’s what i do now, but my background is i was a in the broadcast duitz business, so i worked in radio news as a reporter and anchor it all news radio station, and i’ve also worked at cnn as a news writer, writing especially on some of the international shows, so but i always like to tell people, is when they say, well, gosh, i don’t think that i can explain our mission, you know, in in three sentences final it’ll go on and do that. I always say, you know what? I think if i could explain the ethiopia eritrea border conflict in three sentences and tell you the latest what’s going on with that conflict, give you some person effective and some background and what’s next, if i could do that in three seconds, if i think we could talk about your food pantry and i love your drop names to national wildlife federation, cnn, you know, so she squeezes those in there it’s but their admirable well, they’re the truth that our revolution and and that’s the thing and it’s details and and when you talk about writing details are actually what make it interesting, because as soon as i say, like i was a writer at cnn, like, you know what that means, like you picture that you’re like, wow, you know, when i see the person reading that on tv and i see the person covering that story, yes, someone has to write that. So when i say national wildlife federation that’s so it’s a big non-profit that you know, that has a has a big old mission. You know exactly what it is. So details are really important and writing rather than a bunch of fluffy. Words aren’t any details? Ok? Charity clarity what i always love about cnn is the people who write the the crawl i always admire, but the you know, for listeners, i don’t know what the crawleys keep myself out of jargon jail that that those words at the bottom of the screen that air that air crawling across and describing you said, you know, ethiopian eritrean border conflicts, but they’re doing it in the twitter space one hundred forty characters or less. That’s that’s really amazing, right? Sort of the original twitter when you think about it long before twitter, you had the crawl across the bottom of the screen and crawl started pretty much with breaking news, even in your local television station, maybe dio something going on, you would see that it would be like, you know, weather alert, you know, tornado warning in effect for these areas so that’s really where the crawl started and then when cable news became all the rage, you know, they started doing crawls to and, you know, think about the crawl right it’s like you’re listening to a story about the economy and business, but then there’s a crawl on the bottom that’s telling you like fifty other things, including the fact that lindsay lohan has been arrested again. So it’s it’s it’s the crawl you khun and she just she just hit somebody in new york city i think just just, she said, but it is always time latto proportion he was just looking for the money. Ok, well, really interesting that you’re non-profit involves lindsay lohan called go for what we were talking about the crawl and we were talking about writing for writing for broadcast and here’s the really important thing that you learn what you write in broadcasting and it’s called the teas and it’s a little thing that you say before you know what’s coming up i hate those damn things i hate that cheez its such a tease in the shadows dankmyer get you to stay tuned. For instance, i just thought someone about about writing teases and teases that’s applicability to toe like facebook and to your block and you know headlines for block to get people to come and read your block to read the post so if you tell them what’s in it, if you say like, you know, unemployment is up sixteen percent, you know, or whatever. Then then you’ve already told them the news and there’s no reason st john to read your blood if you say, if you say, you know, fascinating news about unemployment statistics coming up next, you know, like, oh, god, i need to hear that e i know you’re complaining, but the fact is that work, you’re doing a good job and they were i know i’m complaining because they work, they keep me teased and then what? I really get annoyed with me. All right? I’m so annoyed i gotta send out live listener love because got to counteract my annoyance live listener love staten island, new york welcome international china non jin welcome korea welcome korea welcome china more close to home. Welcome staten island live listener love out to those three as well as we still got california, virginia, new jersey, georgia it’s, incredible, texas okay, i feel better know the reason i don’t like to tease is because it works, but you know, what really gets me about the tease is when they tease it and then there’s the commercial break and then they don’t, then they don’t fulfill and then and then wolf blitzer teases, and then he teases it again before the next commercial. Yeah, that’s, that that is very, very annoying. And i do if i’m going to be teased like that, i want i want to pay for it. And then and then, if there’s no real payoff like if it’s the greatest thing you’ve ever seen, like the greatest video you’ve ever seen in your life, then maybe that’s one thing, but if it falls flat, which a lot of times stories d’oh, it’s like you need to deliver. So let’s, think about that in your non-profit writing. So you have a newsletter and you know, it folded up four ways, right? Put in the mailbox and then it lands on your you know, boardmember kitchen counter with all her mail, and she picks it up, right and and it’s it’s folded over his little piece of tape. So you want her to open that. So if you if it’s really like boring on the outside, well, maybe should not even gonna open it, not gonna open it for days. So the thing is to think about what’s on the outside and that little space that you have right a tease. So instead of saying like news and information inside, well, that’s real estate that you’re wasting writing teams there say, like, you know, what’s what’s, the biggest thing that’s happened lately, you know what? That was totally i just thought of that. I mean, i don’t know what your biggest thing is. So even that’s better than then news and interesting information. You look out the information, look how good clarence c i was ranting about wolf blitzer, and she brings it back to the yurt fund-raising newsletter on the kitchen table so so well, so well, adjudicator so thank you. I know i’m grossly inelegant. That’s why claire’s associated with the show to keep me in. I’d like to give a little shout out to the person who taught me everything i knew and that was built. Torrey william tory who’s, the network newscaster worked in neutral radio news and nbc and everywhere else and is a long time d c news guy. And when i was an american university in the early eighties, i’m dating myself here. Oh, my god, you’re really you’re in college in the early eighties. Oh, my god, i was in college in the early eighties, graduated college in eighty three along with my friends julie malkin and angie column these and these are all people now that work for top notch news agencies, and we were all in the same class together. We were young, twenty twenty one year old students in d c very excited about working in the business. Our teacher was built, torrey. And he came from the business which was so important, because in communications, sometimes you get these teachers that are academics, and they’ve never actually worked in the business. But bill had worked, you know, in news and was probably working at the time we had him and he would say things like the beginning of class you take, okay? Let’s say, something’s happening down on you? No dupont circle. How did you get there from here? And, you know, some of the kids to be like, well, i don’t know i’m not very good at directions, but i would raise my hand and say, oh, massachusetts having to make a left and it was it was really interesting. Way to see, like, who could be a reporter? Okay, that was you. Know it’s, that project stuff, so the writing that he taught us was great, because he would say, just say it. So the classic thing i always remembered, all right, one last shot, and then i got to just say, we got to take a break, go ahead, say it, we got to take a break, okay, we’ll make it really quick with the word used, bill said to us. Well, the last time you heard someone say, i saw three youths running down the street, youth, all right, i’m going to quibble with that one, okay, we got to take a break when we returned the way, come back with claire’s cliches, principle of the plan giving agency creative producer of this very show. You may be surprised to know that we have one, but you’re talking. You’re listening to her stay with us, talking alternative radio, twenty four hours a day. Joined the metaphysical center of new jersey and the association for hyre. Awareness for two exciting events this fall live just minutes from new york city. In pompton plains, new jersey, dr judith orloff will address her bestseller, emotional freedom, and greg brady will discuss his latest book, deep truth living on the edge. Are you ready for twelve twenty one twelve? Save the dates. Judith orloff, october eighteenth and greg brady in november ninth and tenth. For early bird tickets, visit metaphysical center of newjersey dot or or a nj dot net. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Dafs you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Welcome back with claire’s cliches, claire meyerhoff. And i just realized, of course mean, before every break i tease. So i’m a hypocrite. Well, learn. You learn from me. So i helped you build out the show. So i taught you about the cases on the brakes and things like that. But you did teach me that much let’s not get carried away. You talking a few things, but no, he taught me a lot about your hot considerably. Yes, my clock. My time sheet. Okay. So youth, you know, what’s. So what’s wrong with saying we do youth youth development or youth mentoring? Well, i mean, that’s. Fine, if that’s if you’re talking to another person in the nonprofit sector, so say you’re at a conference and you need someone and it’s that’s the easiest thing to say, like, well, you know what is what is? What is new beginnings all about? They see your name tag, right says you’re non-profit beginning what’s new beginnings. Hold over your development agency, that person that works in the non-profit they know immediately what that is it’s shorthand. But now when you’re in the real world, if you meet someone at a cocktail party and perhaps there your next big donor, and they say, oh, well, what do you d’oh? I haven’t non-profit called new beginnings really well, what’s that oh, used development, the person might be like let’s say they don’t work in schools or anything even remotely related to that you’re just gonna they’re gonna tune you out instead of saying, well, gosh, you know, we heat we help teenagers that are really having a rough time, and they come to a failing in school and they come to be of a program where they come every day for two hours and by the end of six weeks there, you know, now they’re they’re getting, you know, degrades and and they all have an after school job, right? A detail much richer. Um and yeah, just you, right don’t write for for people in the nonprofit world because a lot of times, you’re not talking to them, all right? Because, you know, shorthanded fine jargon is fine when you’re talking amongst yourself, and sometimes you come up with your own jargon, like like my my favorite client of the national wildlife federation, we have it, we have a term called block and it just means, like, make stuff like, like, oh, we have this new thing all of a sudden she’ll say what we need to block and that just means we know what that means, it’s like, okay, we’ve got to come up with, you know, like the mailings were going to do, and they were going to write things that were going off. We have all these things, and we already know, like what that means, but i can’t go to someone else and say, let’s, watch, right? Of course, that shorthand that we’ve come up with. Now you have a block post work together, you have a block post on this subject, which has a list of jargon, e words, a big list of words and phrases on we’re going to talk about a couple of them, but why don’t you tell people where they can see your comprehensive list of jargon offenses? Well, i’m i’m a frequent tour or sometimes frequent writer and blogger for non-profit marketing guy dot com, which is run by the marvelous stand kitty larue miller, who was really just a genius, and i tend to write for her all kinds of stuff about the media were related to the media, so i wrote a three part series recently about georgian and cliches and writing more concisely and writing more. Okay, where can we find it? Non-profit marketing died dot com mark non-profit marketing guide dot com con word not, or there may be a link to it on your i’ll have to put it on your page. Well, you’re welcome to put it on the show’s facebook page and also the show’s linked linked in group two don’t forget linked in okay, so you go if you go, you know you go to non-profit marketing guy dot com and you’ll see the block and i’m right now. In the second post, my most recent ones so titled jargon jargon, we got jargon, we just have about ninety seconds left. Claire meyerhoff what’s wrong with despite the fact that despite the fact that it’s just long it’s long, why would does anybody say that when you, when you’re talking, despite the fact that no it’s just but okay, all right, i might quibble with some of these not that one i don’t really like, despite the fact that it’s funny it’s like they were, you know, these are from bill torrey, my college teacher had these years ago. And, you know, they’re collected from different sources, like the bbc, the ap, you know, put together by some of these teachers at american university that he worked with, like lincoln, ferber and and and all those guys. So these air list just kind of had around, and he scanned them and sentence which is and wonderful service. What if we render assistance to people? What? What? Everything render assistance to, would you say, would you say i was driving down the street and i saw this poor woman and she had a flat tire, so i immediately pulled over and rendered assistance. I would not say that. I would probably say something more like help. Yeah, i pulled over and helped her system. I would even say assisted right, helped helped. Right? And the thing is, when you use long stuff like that, you know, you could put more details in there. So instead of saying i immediately pulled my car over to the side of the road, you could say, like, you know, she was she was down on her, you know? She was sitting there on the ground that she looked so sad trying to figure out daddy is jack. So i came over and helped, so i helped her way have to leave it there. Claire meyerhoff, principal of the plant e-giving agency. And this show’s creative producer clare, thank you so much for being on again. Thanks, tony it’s. Always a pleasure. My pleasure as well. Even though it’s been two weeks in a row. Still my pleasure, claire. I hope you’ll be with me next week when emily chan will return she’s one of our legal contributors she’s going to be alone. Jean will not be with her she’s from the non-profit and exempt organizations more group and she’ll have something interesting and we’ll have some fun around the law. Have you joined arlington group? You heard me mention it for pete’s sake. Join the group and i’ll stop saying it. You can post your follow-up questions and the guests will answer on the linked in group i host a podcast for the chronicle of philanthropy. It’s called fund-raising fundamentals it’s, a ten minute monthly podcast. And that one is devoted to fund-raising topics it’s on itunes, it’s. On the chronicle of philanthropy website. If you like this show, please check it out. It’s called fund-raising fundamentals wishing you good luck the way performers do around the world. I’m keeping it up. I did italian a few weeks ago. That was in boca. Lupo, remember? And the answer the answer was crappy lupo in the mouth of the wolf and let the wolf die. But since we had the real italian roseanna imbriano on today, michael castaldo helped me out and we have another version of the italian as we robbed through with the italians today, michael costello taught me in the ass of the whale and let’s. Hope you don’t take a ship which sounds much lovelier as in cool. Oh, allah bolena and the reply would be sperry. Ah, mo can oncology so i wish you this week in cool. Oh, allah bolena, i hope it’s oh, it’s comfortable in there for you, our creative producers. Claire meyerhoff. Hard to believe, but it’s true. Sam liebowitz is our producer line producer on this show. Social media is by regina walton of organic social media. The remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. Oh, how i hope that you will be with me for another live show. Next friday, one to two p, m eastern on talking alternative broadcasting. The singing live at talking alternative dot com. Dahna sending dick dick tooting, getting dink, dink, dink, dink. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Get anything? Nothing. You could. Hi, this is nancy taito from speaks been radio speaks been radio is an exploration of the world of communication, how it happens in how to make it better, because the quality of your communication has a direct impact on the quality of your life. Tune in monday’s at two pm on talking alternative dot com, where i’ll be interviewing experts from business, academia, the arts and new thought. Join me mondays at two p m and get all your communications questions answered on speaks been radio. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three the conscious consultant helping hunters. People be better business people. You’re listening to talking on their network at www dot talking alternative dot com now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti athlete named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication. And the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership? Customer service sales or maybe better writing are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. 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095: Got Women Donors & Lovin’ LinkedIn For Prospect Research – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Michele Walsh, director, leadership gifts, at U.S. Fund for UNICEF & Travis Fraser, director, major gifts for United Way of New York City

Maria, Semple, The Prospect Finder, consultant in prospect research and author of “Panning for Gold: Find Your Best Donor Prospects Now”

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

View Full Transcript
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Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio on friday, august twelfth. I’m your aptly named host tony martignetti hope you were with me last week when it was wild woman fund-raising i had mazarene treyz consultant and author of the wild woman’s guide to fund-raising she was with me for the full hour to share her thoughts about career social media grants, manship and mohr. We did our live first tweeting last week, and we’re going to keep that up this week when it is got women donors from the fund-raising day conference in new york city this past june, we talk about successful initiatives to expand your female donor base through targeted and appropriate cultivation, solicitation and stewardship. My guests are michelle walsh from the us fund for unicef and travis fraser from united way of new york city second half of the show linked in for prospect research i’ll be joined by our new regular contributor maria simple the prospect find her, she’ll be sharing strategies for using linked in to find people and organizations who could be your employees boardmember sze volunteers and donors. As i said, we’ll be live tweeting this week the hashtag is non-profit radio we’ll take a break, and then we’ll start with god. Women donors you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Neo-sage you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set to one, two, nine six four three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s a lawrence h bloom two, one, two, nine, six, four, three, five zero two. We make people happy. Zoho hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com durney durney welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven at the marriott marquis in times square in new york city. My guests now are travis fraser and michelle walsh. Travis is director of mate gif ts for united way of new york city and michelle walsh’s, director of leadership gif ts for the united states fund for unicef. Welcome, thank you, thanks pleasure to have you, they’re seminar topic is success stories got women donors, and so we’re all about talking about female donors. Michelle, why are female donors important? Why are the important they’re important? Yeah, i mean, if you look at research even to start, which is where we were talking earlier today, it’s, they’re making up a larger part of the e-giving population than ever before. So i was just referencing an article earlier where in two thousand five was the first year that the irs had records that women were actually out giving men as a whole. I think it was sametz twenty one billion as compared with about sixteen or seventeen billion so and that’s already, you know, six years old at this point, but they have huge giving power and very often that they make their decisions differently, and we need to be aware of that and that they also are motivated differently, so i think they’re important because they do give and when they do give, they tend to mobilize people, so not only did they give their own funds, but they’re also generating additional support very often and travis. Of course, in the upper ages, women survive men on average, yes, moflow closer tonight. So? So if we’re talking about deferred or planned gift, women become critical because typically they’re inheriting their husbands, their husbands, states or a portion of yeah, yes, that’s that’s true, we don’t deal a lot with plant giving within our women’s group, and i think as our core group of members ages and we start looking broadening, i guess t younger populations, we might start making plans with four plan giving with them, but because of how we’re able to engage them and draw them closer to the organization, they really i thing translate into perfect prospects for for major get for plant gifts in the future. So, michelle, you mentioned different donor motivations women versus men. What are some of the differences that you see? I think that women as a whole, obviously only one particular woman relies right, but that if you look at women as a whole, very often they’re motivated by things that they can connect with and be involved with, so they’re motivated by family, they’re motivated by making a difference. We’ve noticed that it’s not usually being on a donor list or being on a donor wall, they also want to be a part of a community that’s doing something that has results so there really is a motivation about doing. Good in the world and what? What? That accomplishment iss okay, and how do you find that different than than the male donor? I think that it’s not as driven in terms of the connection. So seeing something and seeing what it’s doing hasn’t been as much of a motivator for men in that same when you can have more of ah here’s here’s the information this is what it’s going to do? Of course they want to know what the results are but it’s not as much of a desire to be engaged in the process. Okay, yeah, michelle, your work does include working with older donors seventies and eighties women in those ages. I would say that it’s across the board. So we’re looking at ultra high net worth individuals and that’s really are deciding factor. There are certainly maura’s. You get up towards those hyre age groups of people that have accumulated that type of wealth. I think you spoke earlier with some of my colleagues who were talking about the younger generation twenty one to forty, right? And so we’re looking, really hoping towards getting most of the people to million dollar giver is a leadership. Gifts for us is one hundred thousand, but if we’re looking at that group, they are going to be, you know, tend towards the older end of it, but the representation of what portion of that is seventy to eighty, you know, i wouldn’t know off the top of my head, but there are certainly some people in there that would be in that age group, okay? And when you’re dealing with women of that age, i’m trying to focus. We’re talking about dahna motivations what’s your experience with when the husband was the primary donor on dh he’s, now deceased, you’re going to the you’re going to the surviving wife, what’s your experience around their willingness to teo continue to give, i think i mean it’s so individual if they’re very defined and what they’re giving is it’s, you know, very often on lee really about honoring someone’s memory, but if in order to engage them personally is the only way that i think that you’ll be able to get to that larger gift on dh to be able to do that, we’ve had it in a couple of instances, but getting back to even what the data is. Is that women are making more of the decisions while they’re alive. We know, with the married spouses well, i think travis actually was talking about what i was yeah, yeah, don’t you want to, travis? I mean, there there have been some recent studies out that are really showing that women are making about eighty percent of all of the sort of household financial decisions, whether that be philanthropic decisions, just what they buy, what goes into the household there there really the decision makers and i i feel like as fundraisers, we’ve really been led to believe that they are making it in tandem as a couple on dh in some cases that’s, true, but what we’re really finding through some new donorsearch audis that that is that the female is thie number one sort of decider in that position, okay, even when do we know if that applies? Even when the the husband is the person with the primary relationship to the organization, you know, i’m not sure that it goes that the research goes that deep. Um and i think that anytime you have any part of a couple that’s, the primary relationship, you sort of deal with that primary relationship, but also tried to to engage the other spouse in any way that you can with the work because you really want to see that couple as, ah, holistic entity, you know, it’s it’s, not just one person, yeah, excellent and applies all the more if, if the if the husband is the primary relationship, you certainly do want to bring the wife in because, on average, she’s going to be surviving her husband? Yeah, yeah, you know, and i have to say that being at united way were somewhat unique because a lot of our donors give through workplace campaign, so we’re really dealing with one half of the couple we’re really dealing with the female leadership donor xero followers, or mohr and electing to do that through payroll deduction. So it’s really her decision of what she’s doing with her paycheck? So it really involves her more and what she’s interested in and getting into. I sort of heard interest areas, so that has been very interesting for us, especially in trying to branch out and look towards more individual donors who aren’t sitting in the workplace and developing strategies to get to those people on dh and people that are part of a couple and engaging both of them in the work that we’re doing and we’ve definitely found that. So you know, a number of our male board members and with our particular woman in philanthropy initiative it’s been female board members who have led the charge, but a couple of male board members who have really founded a great opportunity and excuse to engage their wives without them. S so where they’re not just dragging them along to an event that they’re like that’s your cause, but that they’re able teo to feel and ask the questions that they want to ask. Without that, what do you call it? A arm, candy or whatever, however you want to call it in either direction, but that there’s no one there to hold them back or push them forward to engage and it’s been a really good opportunity for us to have some good open conversations with the spouse without the key driver, the ky connection president, they didn’t think dick tooting getting ding, ding, ding ding you’re listening to the talking alternate network e-giving e-giving cubine. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna looking to meet mr or mrs right, but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your current relationship as filling as possible? Then please tune in on mondays at ten am for love in the morning with marnie allison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Tune in as we discuss dating, relationships and more. Start your week off, right with love in the morning with marnie gal ilsen on talking alternative dot com hey! Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed, i and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Oppcoll zoho do either of you or maybe both of you work around getting volunteer engagement from from females? Is that a part of your work? Or was it all just related to financial giving? Our entire program is volunteer related thie group that i manage is called women united in philanthropy on dh it is managed by a group of volunteers who come in volunteers steering committee that really charts the course of everything that that does so how do you start to get people engaged in that volunteer steering committee? Well, it really has been through the work of other steering committee members, we’ve been around for nine years, and this is a women’s this women’s group. Yes, it started from a conversation we were challenged by a female donor, two who asked us what we were doing to engage female donors, and we didn’t really have an answer for her. So we had a female boardmember who was very interested in getting to an answer. So she opened her home. We took a look at our lists of donors and sent out invitations to a number of our female donors to come together for a round table conversation and what came out of that conversation was very core group of dedicated women who really wanted to build something, and from that, we’ve been able to build a program that really engages women in the topic area that we’re raising money for, which is youth empowerment, and we are able to really talk about the issues that were that that we’re working towards. We give them opportunities to volunteer in the programs to see their dollars at work. Andi have educational forums that bring together some some thought leaders in the areas of education and health so that they really feel like they’re a part of the philanthropic process and that’s really what we tried to do to engage our female donors. Travis foster fraser sorry is a director of major gifts for united way of new york city and michelle walsh’s, director of leadership gif ts for united states fund for unicef and you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven earlier, i said next-gen charity because we were because michelle, when we’re talking about a twenty one to forties it’s next-gen so it got me saying next-gen which way also be at the nextgencharity conference, but today we’re not they weren’t fund-raising day two thousand eleven, travis, do you see a difference in the willingness of male donors versus female in terms of the the time commitment, willingness to spend time? You know, i think that’s an interesting question, and, you know, i a lot of my work is with our our female group, but also with our young professionals group, okay? And i would say that in our young professionals group there’s really not that discrepancy between the amount of time to volunteer, the males and females of that generation are really wanted to eat together, and i would say that with with people that i’m working with on the women’s group there it is a little bit easier to get women out to volunteer opportunities because i think they just really want to see there the work in the fields, and and i think a lot of times, men, i can take it from you as the fundraiser to hear about what their work is doing. Our work is doing it. Michelle, do you see a difference between men and women in terms of their their desire for understanding outcomes? And what the impact of their gift is, is there a difference across the genders there? There probably is i think that women are often underestimated and their willingness to really want to do dig into the data and the financials and all of those pieces. And of course, if your stereo tell you, you know that they wouldn’t get it or that they don’t want to really spend time with a balance sheet or that they’re more emotionally driven or whatever the some of the negative stereotypes are on. Some of them were positive, but does though, right? But i think that women do want to understand what what the back end thinking is, and particularly as you deal with the higher end givers and the more sophisticated philanthropists, they know what they’re looking for, and there are certain delivery bols that they expect, and there are certain organizational structures they expect to be in place with their financial or otherwise, and they ask those questions, and they think very seriously about where they’re going to give their money, you know you’re going through, i can piggyback on that, you know, we have a group of our committee that comes in and meets with our program’s staff to really talk about what they’re doing and and what the investment that women united has made in united way is really is doing, and they ask the toughest questions they want to know exactly what the budget is. They want to know what the money is being spent on, and i think that that is the thinking that you were alluding to earlier is completely backwards. I think they really want to understand the entire issues they want from from costs of services to then what the services are actually doing, that they really want the whole full, holistic three sixty view of initiative. Michelle, you’re experienced. Yeah, and i would say that we’ve sound found more different is between sectors and where people worker identify themselves and professional sectors than male female. So, you know, sort of the hedge fund circle has a certain way of thinking about a problem, and they’ll come at you with a set of questions that are almost predictable, and lawyers have a certain way of approaching it more so than a cross gender lines. I’m not going to ask you to comment on your own individual situation is that united way or united states fund for your staff? Generally, do you see women adequately represent went on boards? So from where i said, i think there’s a couple of key pieces, one is that our ceo is an amazing female leader, and that has really set the tone and a lot of ways for not only supporting our initiative with women philanthropists but inboard leadership. So the four, therefore women, all board members, that air chairing our women in philanthropy initiative and the strategy around engaging ultra high net worth individuals to support the u s from for unicef, and they have all stepped up phenomenally, and i think it’s been critical in having those female representatives on the volunteer level onboard leadership roles, and they represent really influential rose rolls and the rest of their lives, and they’ve brought that to bear on this effort. It’s been absolutely critical about your travis do you worry about again? Not necessarily united way, but do you worry about there being inadequate representation of women on boards? I think there’s there’s more work that needs to be done, but i think that a lot of organizations are realizing that women make very, very strong boardmember is there much more thoughtful about the issues? They really want to understand the full picture of what is going on, and they don’t just sort of make those knee jerk reactions that sounds like an ideal boardmember and and, you know, i can say for the united way system, we recently did a survey of the one hundred and twenty different women’s leadership groups that united way has across our system, and what we have found, which is astounding, is that from the year two thousand seven to two thousand nine, which had the huge financial meltdown united ways that had boards with that were made up of thirty percent or more female participation, their women’s group grew about twenty eight percent in fund-raising and fund-raising and dollars contributed just versus those united ways that had less than thirty percent makeup of women on their board grew their fund-raising grew one percent. So really shows the power i think, of women to really come together, rally around a cause and get people to contribute at very, very critical times, i have to say credit to the person who thought toe look att that variable female representation on the board that’s not that’s, not a very and its outcome in fund-raising that’s, not by any means a typical variable that you would see and look at the outcome of the correlation with interesting let’s. See michele, in terms of let’s, talk a little about, like nuts and bolts. I don’t want to spend a whole lot of time on soliciting women, but we’ll spend a couple of minutes you have advice that’s particular to women about asking, you know, your your work is an ultra high net worth but not necessary, you know, generally soliciting women advice? I don’t think it’s any different than soliciting a man because i mean ideally still stations at that level happened face-to-face one on one and it’s doing good fund-raising and reading people’s faces and listening to the cues and paying attention to what they’re interested in and compassionate about or passionate about. Rather, i think in that regard, it’s all the same, some of the messaging and the way that we engage them leading up to that is where the differences okay and that’s, the stuff we’ve been talking about. Exactly travis, how about for you closing thoughts, i think, really, the only thing that i would add is just making sure that there is a really good next step for them to be involved in a substantive way beyond writing the check, whether that is taking them out on a program visit to go see see the work, whether they they’re volunteering at a school, whatever it is, just make sure that there there’s a really solid next up for them to get involved because they really want to get involved, okay? I just realized we have a lot more time than i than i thought you’ve done yourself. You had your seminar already today or it’s coming up, we had any provocative questions from the audience that you want to share around the subject. We’re interesting, yeah, i was talking to some of my colleagues and some of the other sessions and comparing notes on questions, and i think the one that i heard that came up in all the questions was sort of how to say no, no to a gift, no to the wrong gift or no to a donor who wants to direct very specifically, in a way, that’s. Not in line or give them right. They want to make a decision. That’s not really their decision to make and navigating that. What was your what was? Did you have that in your session or what? Wait. Okay. I know. I mean, i have one of the most important things. Is the fundraisers to know when to say no? And how does they know? And it’s? Not always easy and not everyone’s. Good at saying no, but giving people what we talked about is creating option so people feel like they’ve made it legitimate choice, but not beyond what your realm of possibilities are. So a multiple choice question as opposed to an open ended question where people can say, this is really what i want to dio bye still not creating the program from scratch and tweaking the little details, but giving them real opportunity to be a part of the experience as well the experience of of whatever the program is. So if it’s, you know, for us, it’s obviously in the field and international development. But, you know, even if it’s the question came from someone who was working in parks, even if it’s a parks project making them a part of how that plays out. How about you, travis? Any questions that came up in your program that you want to share one? Well, i think that that my group is able to direct the money at the end of the year that they raise, and that can create a lot of nervousness, i think, among program staff and really, you know, and i know it’s something that unicef does as well, we don’t just open it up and say, okay, you’ve got this big pot of money, where do you want to put it? You know, we we really bring them in so that they can meet with our program staff and give them sort of a menu of options of where we think they could have the most impact and take it from there because we’ve really been able to develop relationships where they understand that we’re going to give them what we think is bad that’s for the organization as a choice, and it really allows them to feel like they’re making a choice and have an investment in what we’re doing. But then, at the end of the day, we get what we need you at the same time, so the organization obviously has a role in setting expectations, managing expectations, sort of, and michelle is, you suggested the multiple choice question, constraining things so that people are not out out in left field success stories got women donors as thie seminar topic for travis frazer, director of major gif ts for united way of new york city, and michelle walsh, director of leadership gif ts for united states fund for unicef, travis michelle, thank you very much for joining me, thinking it’s been a pleasure to have you. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven. That was my pre recorded interview from fund-raising day last june in new york city. Now we’ll take a break after the break. Tony’s, take two, and then, after that, linked in for prospect research, so stay with me. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping hunters. People be better business people. Dahna this is tony martignetti athlete named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio friday’s one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting do you want to enhance your company’s web presence with an eye catching and unique website design? Would you like to incorporate professional video marketing or mobile marketing into your organization’s marketing campaign? Mission one on one media offers a unique marketing experience that will set you apart from your competitors, magnify your brand exposure and enhance your current marketing efforts. Their services include video production and editing, web design, graphic design, photography, social media management and now, introducing mobile market. Their motto is way. Do whatever it takes to make our clients happy. Contact them today. Admission one one media dot com. Talking. Welcome back to the joe it’s time for tony’s take too, but first a reminder that we are live tweeting today, the hashtag is non-profit radio please join the conversation on twitter on tony’s take two this week. My block post is a test of google plus for your non-profit i was interviewed by new york enterprise report for an article on using google plus in small business, and i thought my ideas might help you to evaluate google plus for your non-profit now, of course, caveat, i’m not a social media guru expert thought leader, a small business owner. And so with that caveat, i’ll tell you what i’m doing with google plus and how i’m evaluating it, and you can see if that makes sense for your office or not. I’m really looking at the people who become my friends on google plus and the features that it ends up offering for the business profile pages, which is, you know we know them in facebook as a fan page. Google plus doesn’t have business profiles yet, but we all expect him to be coming, and google says they are coming within the next couple of months, so i’m going to be interested in who the people are, who joined me on google plus either because i invite them or they’re inviting me if they’re the same as the people i know on facebook, i’m probably going to be less likely to spend a lot of time, you know, keeping up a very active profile page on google. Plus, i would certainly have one, but how much time i devote to it is really what the issue would be on the same thing with the features. If it’s pretty much the same features as a facebook fan page, then i don’t really see advantage, but if it has some things that i’m looking for that i don’t see in facebook like for me, it’s ah good calenda ring application and a good, solid polling application like we can do in surveymonkey but built in facebook doesn’t have those things and it has polling, but not really a strong one, so if it has good features, i’ll be again more likely toe spend more time keeping a very active business profile page on google plus, so those are my ideas around evaluating whether to do that for my business, i don’t know if that’s of value to you, it might be in looking at google plus for your small non-profit um, you can see more detail about that on my block at m p g a d v dot com, and that is tony’s take two for friday, august twelfth with me now is maria simple. Maria is our newest regular contributor to the show. She’ll be on once a month. She is the prospect finder. Maria is an experienced trainer and speaker on prospect research and consults with organizations interested in finding and connecting with their best prospects for long term relationships. Her website is the prospect finder dot com, and i’m really pleased to welcome maria to the show. Welcome, maria, thanks so much. I’m delighted to be here. It’s a real pleasure to have you were going to be talking about linked in today. Lincoln has some new initiative for non-profits you want to explain what what’s up there? Yeah, absolutely so what’s kind of interesting about it is that linked in a little earlier this year, actually in may, haddon i po and so now they are actually deciding they’re going to dedicate some resource is in terms of against money, but as well as human resource is to the non profit sector now on ideo aipo means means what jargon jail mary-jo actually started issuing stock, they became a public company, so initial public offense and they actually launched something called lincoln non-profits solutions, and so what they’ve decided is that they have three point six million individual members who actually identify themselves as either employees or board members of a non-profit so they realize that there’s a tremendous amount of potential to help the nonprofit sector and they are actually i’m going to be helping people they back, they’ve launched a page called learned dot lincoln dot com forward slash non-profits, where they actually give the non-profits both as non-profit professionals, but also as organization’s best practices on tips and tools for how to make the most out of the lincoln for non-profit so they’re looking at both individuals and organizations, you say, and that that three point six million, i’m sure there are a lot more than that because there are one hundred million linkedin users, isn’t that right? Yes. So, yes, you are. But you know, what kind of interesting is that? They somehow been able to identify that there, there are, you know, the three point six million who are somehow connected to the non profit sector, right? Because i’m sure, based on keywords in their profile or just the way they what they identify their employer as, but i’m sure that’s low. I’m sure there are more than three point three and a half percent of the lincoln community working for non-profits but so maybe this initiative will will draw out some more. But even with that three point six million, yes, so they have this the the u r l you gave that’s the learning center, right? Yes. That’s correct. They have a specific learning center set up now for the nonprofit sector. And when you’re on that page, if you scroll all the way to the bottom, they actually have a contact a cab. So their interest sted in hearing from non-profits selves non-profit professionals and organizations and board members as to how lincoln can best serve the specter. So they are open to feedback at this point in their formulating this as they go along and you spoke with someone who’s in charge of this non-profit initiative. That lengthened in you? Yes. Somebody who has recently joined linked in his name is brian breckenridge. And he is heading up the new program there. And he’s, you know, he’s very excited and he’s very open to learning from the nonprofit sector. About what, how they convinced serve the non-profits and so since you had a spoke to him recently, any inside track about what we might be seeing the into the future? Well, i don’t have any specifics to share with you, but i do know that they are planning some interesting changes, hopefully that they’re rolling out in the next, you know, in the next couple of months so it’s, you know, they’re they’re formulating this, they’re looking, they’re taking in and looking for feedback at this point and anything that they can do the best help a non-profit sector they’re looking for that feedback at this time, and then they’ll be looking to roll out some new initiatives, i think okay, and you see value in the lincoln non-profit solutions for prospect research. Absolutely i do, you realise linked in for prospect research and for prospecting. So i utilize it in both, eh? Proactive sense as well, as in a reactive okay, let’s distinguish between prospect research and prospecting. What do you mean, weird? When you say those two different things differently? What do you mean by both? By each? Okay, so if i’m doing research on a potential major donor potential boardmember for the for a non-profit and i have the name of that individual lengthen is definitely one of the places that i go to to try and formulate my profile on that individuals. So that is what i would call reactive research. I have the name of someone, and this is one of my tools that i use to do prospect research. Now proactively you, khun, take linked in and use their advance people search feature to find people who might be suitable for your non-profit for connections in a variety of situations, they have a keyword search. You can focus your search down to within a radius of your zip code of where your non-profit is located, you can focus your search down to specific industries, so if you are looking, if you are let’s, take the example of a on environmental group, right let’s say they are looking to connect with more individuals in their community who are involved in some sort of environmental services so they would be able to conduct this search. Now, obviously, when you conduct a search on lincoln, first of all, you have to have your own lincoln personal on dh. This is using the advanced certain advanced search. Is that right? That’s? Correct. Have on the right on the upper right hand side called advance. Okay, you quick, matt. It opens up an entire new search screen that most people haven’t really access, you know, realize it’s there. And the more rich your own network is, the more people you are connected to, the richer the search results will be for you right now. If i were, let me give you two very contrast examples. I actually happen to have over five hundred connections in my lengthen network. So my search results would be drastically different from somebody who is a very new to lincoln and only has a network of, say, twenty, thirty, fifty people. Because you’re always shown how many degrees you’re separated from someone. So the more people i have in my network, greater search results going so so you mean when? You’re doing this advanced search you’re searching all the hundred million people in linked in and it’s telling you which of those are in your first degree, meaning you’re connected to them directly, which are too removed from you, which are three removed from you. Is that what you think you were searching the whole population of linked in? You can. Yes, but you can ask lincoln to just focused down the search results for you to the people you might be first degree connected to second degree or perhaps where you share a group membership. Because there you’re going to be ah, lot closer. You have a lot closer of an affinity and making the one toe one connection may be easier for you. Ok? Suppose you that’s really rich that you can search the whole hundred million. Suppose you find somebody who’s two degrees removed from you and they seem like a very good i don’t know. Maybe maybe we’re provoc betting for board members. Let’s say, for this, for this environmental group that you suggested you see somebody to removed from you. What? Explain what that means. And then how can you try to meet that person? Okay, tony let’s say we come up with let’s say, i do this search and i’m looking for environmental people who and i come up with a guy named oh, i don’t know john smith. And you and i are first degree connected on lengthen that much i know, but let’s say, john smith eyes second degree connected to me through you. That means he is both first degree connected to you. And i am first degree connected to you. So you are the common link between us, right? Ok, so that would mean john is a second degree. So, like those, like those kevin bacon seven degrees from kevin bacon movie. Right? Because he’s been in so many popular movies. Okay, so you can get to him through me, in other words, that’s. Right. So what did you do? How do you do that? Well, lincoln actually provide you with the the there’s a form that you can fill out so that a message would be sent to both john and to you. Looking for that introduction. I could look to be just connect with john directly and say, john, in my my request to connect, i might say john, you and i both know tony. Andi, i think we have a lot in common. I’d love to be able to connect with you here on lincoln. Always modify that that’s that standard introduction that lincoln provides to you never just go ahead and just use the standard intro, you realize those defaults aren’t aren’t very friendly, really there’s really bare bones, but so you’re allowed to your lot to connect with john smith your lot to contact john smith, even though you’re not directly connected to him. That’s correct. I could just send him an invitation to connect and just mention your name in my little intro is toe. Why? I think he and i might want to connect, you know, it’s up to him to accept my connect. Ction request? Sure. Okay, i see what you’re doing it through the request to connect. Okay. I see. On dh. Then the alternative is you could ask me to connect you to him. That’s. Right? I could ask you directly. I could go the old fashioned way. Tony, i could pick up the phone and call you and say, tony, you know, how well do you know john is? This somebody you know very well can you make some sort of a personal introduction even outside of lincoln through an email system. But at least lincoln’s provide you with the opportunity to identify potential boardmember potential donors in very specific sectors. Yes, the phone. You could pick up the phone and do it that way. And that way we don’t have to communicate through linkedin using their default messages or which we would really like. Anyway, i never thought that you could pick up the phone, imagine it could even have lunch and we could talk about it that way. Way. Imagine. See what? See what the web can do. Encourages you to pick up the phone. How do we had we operate without linked in years ago? I don’t know. So let’s, go back to the learning center. Um, yes. So they have. They have suggestions there for individuals and non-profits maria, we have just like a minute before a break. What are a couple of the not for profit? The organizational suggestions on unlinked in. And then after the break, we’re going to detail. Well, you could create a company page at no cost. So corporations, companies. Small businesses are doing this. We i highly recommend that a non-profit create a what they call a company page for their own. Non-profit, and they actually give the example of the american red cross that has attracted thousands of followers on lengthen and so other non-profits may want to check out what they have done. And, you know, look, learn from that and not reinvent the wheel. Ok, well, look att, the company profile and other things. After this break with maria simple, the prospect finder. Stay with us. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Duitz are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed, i and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office needs better leadership, customer service sales, or maybe better writing speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications, that’s the answer. You crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com lively conversation top trends, sound advice, that’s, tony martignetti non-profit radio and i’m ken berger from charity navigator. Oh! And i’m tony martignetti and i’m with maria simple, the prospect finder we’re talking about using linkedin to find and connect with people who could be boardmember sze donors, employees, volunteers. So, maria, the advice that you were giving before the break is that a new organization could create a ah profile page that’s correct, and i would highly recommend that they do that and the reason tony is and and i’m not suggesting that they should set aside any of their other social media strategies and presences like that they might have on facebook or twitter, but what you want to be able to do here is this is lincoln is the professional network, so you want to be able to, of course, capture the attention of people who are in the business community. You don’t want to exclude this, so this is free, you know, obviously whoever is maintaining your presence on other social media’s would want to be able to set this up and you can upload your logo. You would be able to give a nice description about the organization, provide your website, there’s, even a mapping feature where they tie it right into google maps. So that people will be able to see precisely where your non-profit is located. So, you know, it’s free, and i think that they should take advantage of that. I think the lincoln says there about one hundred thousand non-profits that have company pages, there should be many more that’s, a that’s, a good number, but there should be a lot more. How specifically does this one do they? I mean, how do you create a a company profile or non-profit profile versus creating a personal profile? Well, of course, the help affection of of lincoln is going to be very, very helpful to you, but they also have here they give you some steps on how you might be able to do that right on the non-profit learning center that we talked about earlier, okay? And again, the girl for that is linked in dot com slash forward slash non-profits actually, it starts off with the word learn ellie, are there yet i left. Yes, thank you very much. Learn dot linked in dot com forward slash non-profits thank you. And now groups are very popular and non-profits can create their own non-profits can create their own groups and you couldn’t decide if the group is going to be a closed group, meaning that everybody has to be first approved by some sort of a group moderator thatyou’re going to appoint at your end or it could be an open group. And keep in mind that if it’s an open group, all of the discussions are open and searchable and people can just join the group without any type of moderation. That and what’s the value for having creating your own group after you’ve created your profile. Well, they might. It might be in an interesting way to host certain conversations around specific topics and, uh so they, you know, if you have, if you’re a large enough non-profit and maybe you are hosting even conferences around your specific topic, that is something that you can use the group for if you want to engage people in discussions, much like you might see discussions in other types of groups that people are on on linked in, but it would be very specific to the time of organization that you are in the population that you serve, and after you create the groups than you invite people to join is that how it works. Well, you can’t invite people to join. Yes. You definitely can do that and invite people who are already in your linked in world to join the group. But people are going to be able to find you once you are set up in a group on lengthen. You are now searchable as well. So i remember i was telling you about the search functionality. The groups are a way that people, you know, look for like somebody might look for a live networking group to join. Somebody might be looking for a group around this specific area that you serve. Okay, so yeah. So if your work is for the m r d d community, the mentally retarded, developmentally disabled, you might create a group around the service around dahna discussion around the needs about that for that community in your own communities, you could make it a very localized group. Yes, you can. Some groups are geographically localized as well. But you may not want to limit it to that. I mean, lengthen is a worldwide a phenomenon, if you will. So why not? Why not? Just open it right up and allow people? To tto learn more and you never know where that relationship is going to lead. Okay, um, they also have something called linked in recruiter for for job, for organizations looking for employees, how does that work? So what they’re doing is lincoln does have a recruiting solutions portion, which is a fee based portion to their service that’s kind of steep, isn’t it? Well, yeah, for some non-profits mean, what they’re saying in an article that i read is that they are starting as low as four hundred dollars a month when you could be a little steep saw non-profit but they are, you know, offering these recruiting solutions, if you will, at a discounted price for what they would offer the for-profit world, okay, and that’s, if you’re looking for employees that’s correct, if you look nufer employees, they have they have sort of three separate sections, one is called lincoln recruiter one is called jobs network Job slots and the other 1 is called career pages. Okay, let’s, talk a little bit just in a couple minutes we have left about the offerings for individuals who are in non-profits what what’s the advice that that the learning center gives for individuals. Well, you definitely want to make sure that your profile is as one hundred percent complete as possible. So you want to make sure that your profile itself is rich so that as you go out and try and make connections with people, you will be able tio look like somebody, obviously, that other people really want to connect with that you are a thought leader within your own community, if you will. And so it’s really like a resume on steroids, you know, your opportunity to really shine and stand out from other people, so why not make it that way? Using the status updates, i’s a great way to let people know sharing articles, having to do with sector that you serve if you are a speaker, it’s a great way to let people know where you’ll be speaking, especially as it relates to your subject matter area on dh, especially if you do a lot of speaking on behalf of your non-profit it will let people know where you’re speaking either virtually and webinar format or, you know, live format if people are looking by the way tony and forgot to mention earlier fremery we have just about it, we have just about a minute left. Ok, on the resource is page of my website of the prospect finder dot com i do have a downloadable maria samples top five tips for prospecting with lincoln, so if they’re interested in some general tips about lincoln for themselves on a personal level, this will help them. I think you also learn how to use some of the more advanced features, all right, thank you for sharing that resource page that’s really all the time we have that is maria, said pompel the prospect finder again, you’ll see her at the prospect finder dot com, and she’ll be joining us once a month to talk about her advice for prospect research. Maria, welcome to the show as a regular contributor and thanks for today. Thank you, tony it’s been a pleasure next week, we’re going to lead the leader’s motivating your board to fundraise. Another interview from the fund-raising day conference last june, the consultant, andy robinson and carry kruckel, whose vice president for development and communications at w n tv reveal how to move your board to be the best fundraisers they can be. And the second half of the show explaining earned income are legal contributors jean takagi and emily chan from san francisco. Breakdown what earned income is why it can be good white-collar be bad, why you need to understand it to protect your non-profit and keep it out of trouble that’s what’s coming up next week, you can keep up with with what’s coming up week after week by signing up for our insider email alerts on the facebook page. While you’re there like us and become a fan of the show, please, you can listen to tony martignetti non-profit radio on the device of your choice. Any time you like. By subscribing on itunes getting the automatic download, you’ll find that at non-profit radio dot net on twitter. You can follow me always use the hashtag if you want to talk about the show and the hashtag is non-profit radio on twitter, our creative producer is claire meyerhoff, our line producer and the owner of talking alternative broadcasting his sam liebowitz. Our social media is by regina walton of organic social media. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio. I hope you’ll be with me next friday one to two p, m eastern, on talking alternative broadcasting right here at talking alternative dot com cerini. Do you think that shooting getting dink, dink, dink, dink? You’re listening to the talking alternate network, waiting to get you thinking. Cubine looking to meet mr or mrs right, but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your current relationship as filling as possible? Then please tune in on mondays at ten am for love in the morning with marnie gal ilsen as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Tune in as we discuss dating, relationships and more. Start your week off, right with love in the morning with marnie gal ilsen on talking alternative dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? 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060: Research on Women Donors & Learning Lobbying Limitations – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Samantha Cohen, associate director of principal gifts at the American Civil Liberties Union
Gene Takagi and Emily Chan of the Nonprofit & Exempt Organizations Law Group

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://mpgadv.com

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Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host and it’s friday, september twenty third, two thousand eleven i certainly hope you were with me last week when we talked about learning office lease lessons. First we talked through the walk through how do you find the best space and use different spaces to strategically head into your lease negotiations? My guest was george grace, who has done this work for dozens of non-profits then what least terms do you need to be careful about? And what are the negotiating points? I was joined by attorney robert j smith and kate piela, executive director of dance new amsterdam, and we talked through the dance companies less than desirable lease to bring out lessons to help you get the best lease next time this week, it’s prospect research on women donors recorded at the fund-raising day conference in june. Samantha cohen of the american civil liberties union is going to reveal how tow reveal reveal how to reveal wth e-giving potential for your female prospects that is often hidden and learning lobbying limitations are legal contributors jean takagi and emily chan explained the limitations on lobbying by non-profits what activities are lobbying, how much can you do, and how do you report all that on tony’s, take two in between the segments, thinking is underrated. My block post this week, the aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio. We’re going to take a break. I hope you’ll stay with us and then prospect research on women donors. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three that’s two one two, seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set to one, two, nine six four three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s a lawrence h bloom two, one, two, nine, six, four, three, five zero two. We make people happy. Hey, are you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com. Hi there and welcome back right now i have a pre recorded segment for you from june at fund-raising day in new york, we talked with samantha cohen of the american civil liberties union about prospect research on women donors hears that pre recorded sessions welcome back to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven at the marriott marquis in new york city. My guest right now is samantha cohen. She is director of principal giving at the american civil liberties union. Samantha welcome, welcome. Thank you. Pleasure to have you samantha’s topic is prospect researchers research on women donors how to research female donors and out of female research female, major and planned e-giving donors what is the importance of females in individual giving? Let’s start with that, samantha. Well, i think it’s very important to realize that women are outliving man, and at the end of the day, the wealth transfer is going from the man to the women. So a large proportion of e-giving will be directed by webbing, women, both outright and very much a steak gaps. Is it often hard to find the what the wealth of women? Is it often? In the husband’s name now the deceased husband’s name or is that a problem? That certainly can be a problem, but you can you can find some of the resources. I think the key with the research is to pay very close attention to the holistic picture when you’re doing a profile, not just looking at the particular name on the real estate records, but looking at all of the real estate records, looking at the names on the e-giving history when you could look at it as a whole, you get a much better sense of what the individual. Okay, so you’re advocating holistic prospect research? Absolutely okay, not only looking at the financial records you’re you’re part of the workshop was really about using the prospect research to on on women to best advantage, but what do you as a gift officer? What do you like to see as the product that’s that comes from the prospect researcher? So i am very dependent on prospect research. Sure, i am certainly interested in the wealth indicators i’m looking at the estimated wealth capacity, the gift capacity, but i am as interested in the indicators that tell me about e-giving. Priorities. So i’ll give you a very good example. We had a fabulous case study that i talked about today, and the research showed some great wealth. All of the real estate was in the husband’s name, all of the giving history was in both of their names and e-giving seemed to be to certain extent schizophrenic it seemed to be all too human and health services and education for half the guests, and the other half of the gifts were women’s rights and reproductive rights, and that didn’t make sense holistically. So i use that to drive a lot of questions, asking the couple individually what their priorities were came to find out the only thing they shared wass thie, my organization, and that, in fact, we were their single biggest shared priority, which, when i looked at their other giving based on research, were five figure gives suggested to me that there was a seven figure gift for us so that’s a great example of your talking about researching female prospects, but again, holistic approach. You have to be talking to the husband as well, if he’s still living? Absolutely, absolutely. What about other family? Are you often? Involved bringing in other family members aside from the spouse, we are very involved in doing multigenerational giving, and we actually talk sometimes two, three and four generations of families and it’s very interesting that families, when we’re dealing with wealth at the top one percent top ten percent that those families often erm having formal meetings, formal discussions and learning about who the power players are within those discussions within those families is incredibly valuable. We had done on older, older child, for instance, very influential to the mother and father. Absolutely. We had done some research and found that the man was in the health insurance business very, very wealthy. All of the money was his, and he had generated it. But in conversations with him came to find out that the family, he, his wife and the children make the decisions as a family, but that it’s, very democratic and the women in the family actually usually out vote the math. So instead of continuing to meet with him alone, i asked if i could come and meet with the women. So the role of women is not only because greater longevity no, not at all, they’re making a lot of the decision now you said you are very interested in the wealth indicators. What do you like? Sort of specifically like to see from prospect research in as you’re preparing? I want to see if there is political gether. If there is political giving, i’m looking not just amount, but who and what they’re giving it to. I want to see real estate, i want to see a publicly traded company information i’m also interested in news articles about why companies were founded as particularly valuable when i’m dealing with a woman and she has owned and founded her own company, finding out more about why she created that company and they’re often profiles business journals and community journals. That information could be very directive into how these in having these conversations is there. Is there value in? Well, clearly there is value in the financial information. Are you reluctant to meet with someone before you have some prospect research on them? What’s your what’s, your personal pride election that way so i want to have something i want to know some of what i’m going into, but i’m not going to have the lack of that information stop me from meeting. So with some people, you confined very little and some you confined, nothing is not going to stop me from having the meeting. There is nothing more powerful than standing face to face with someone and asking the questions, that thing. The thing you’re listening to the talking alternate network. E-giving thank you. Good. Are you stuck in your business or career, trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna hi, this is psychic medium. Betsy cohen, host of the show. The power of intuition. Join me at talking alternative dot com mondays at eleven a. M call in for a free psychic reading. Learn how to tune into your intuition to feel better and to create your optimum life. I’m here to guide you and to assist you in creating life that you deserve. Listen every monday at eleven a, m on talking alternative dot com. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed, i and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Hi, i’m kate piela, executive director of dance, new amsterdam. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. And how important do you find the meeting to be in feeding back to prospect research? I think that’s something that has been missing a lot in the business there’s a lot of push out of information from research officers are not very good at sharing it back. We tend to like to do a full circle, so i’ll come back and say, i heard that they were very involved, maybe in a different country, maybe in a different state. Can we do some research there? I’ll bring that back, our researcher will do more information, and it becomes his fabulous feedback loop that includes the donor that just creates this beautiful fall fall because there’s there’s nothing better than sitting with someone right over a meal for an hour, hour and a half or in their office for thirty minutes that i’ve always thought that’s the incredibly valuable prospect research you’re finding out wealth of information you find out more than you ever can from the database, and it sounds like you’re using the written material when you do have it to inform the questions that you’re going to ask, right? I mean, you’re you’re running the meeting? Absolutely. Talk a little about running them, running the prospect meeting for us. So for me, for the meeting, i don’t want to spend a lot of time talking about mission or about the organization. I already know the organization, they often know the organization and with our members, they’ve known it probably longer and better than i ever could. So i want to know about that. I want to ask questions like, how do you make your philanthropic decisions? Why do you give to us? Why did you first give to us? Do you and your husband make the same decision to have the same have the same priorities? Those of the questions i want to ask and learn about when do you make your decisions? I wanted to drill down and find out, are they ultimately are their assets that they can give that we couldn’t find? Have they considered including real estate, how they concluded considered including in a state gift? So i normally spend probably two thirds of the meeting asking those sorts of questions, finding out a lot more about what they do, why they do it, and then i’m going to make a solicitation, i don’t like meeting without making the ass outstanding gift officer. Of course, you mentioned the hard to find assets. What kinds of questions do you ask to try to find out about what’s? Not so public. So one of the things that we’re seeing a lot of now as the economy is starting to finally take up is an increase in pose cos they’re starting to go public again. Let’s, identify that now. Tony martignetti non-profit radio we have george in jail. I would hate for you to be subjected. Jog, jail, right? I don’t have my keys. I sometimes have warden. I don’t have them. So just define aipo for people. So when i po it’s, an initial public offering and it’s when a private company is listed on a public exchange, the dow jones, the nasdaq on a public exchange so the public can invest in it, brings in a huge influx of cash to the business and becomes often a liquidity event on opportunity for the owner before the company was private to get some of their investment out. Okay. And though so, there could be some significant tax benefits that can be syntax considerations if you think of it as a year in which you have more money. What do you do with that money? So so how do you how do you get to dahna? Well, you would know, i guess, from the research that they do own a privately held business, i will and that’s normally about all i know. Okay, so how do you go from there? I will ask questions about how the business is doing. What’s going on with the business from research, i will also often see an uptick in marketing material. So all of a sudden, there are more news articles on the business, there’s, more press and there’s no reason why, after ten years in business, they should be in every business journal for the last six months. It’s suggest to me they’re trying to build their brand and something is going on, so i’ll actually ask about that. And then at that point, someone could often say, well, we’re on the verge of going public, and then i can have a whole different conversation you want to give stock now, do you want to give stock after there’s a whole different conversation? So i’m looking for information. To know where the business is. Conversely, it could also be looking tio here that someone is divesting themselves of a private business. They’re retiring, they’re going to give it to their kids, that’s a whole different liquidity event. So i’m looking for those and that’s information that i confined sometimes for research, but much more from the conversations that’s an outstanding example of using the research to go much, much deeper in your meeting this’s tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the fund-raising fund-raising day two thousand eleven with samantha cohen, director of principle you have the right principle giving at the american civil liberties union, and we’re talking about prospect research for females with female prospects and using that using that research wisely, i’ll ask you sort of ah, you know, softball question, what else would you like to say about using the valuable research? I think that we need to use the research we have. We need to be careful. We need to be analytical in that research, but we can’t depend solely on recent okay, lack of research shouldn’t stop you from getting out the door. That’s right on. How much of your time would you say you spend out of the office not nearly enough, but i would like to be out of the office at least seventy five percent of the time. Okay? And what is it that keeps you in when you’d like to be out or if you if you don’t want to say that so much, what strategies do you have for getting more time out of the office in with donors and prospects? How do you minimize that office? Time to get you more out a targeted portfolio, so really weeding out the prospects in the in the portfolio that aren’t going to produce. So i’m doing a lot more qualifying meetings to look at people to figure out know this person is not going to be a major donor, and i’m removing them from the portfolio so that my portfolio is becoming much more targeted, which allows me to spend more time with fewer people, produce better results, okay? And as you’re as your meeting with those better prospects, let’s, go back to the cycle ing back of information to the prospect research team. You use a call report for that if you have a sit down what’s the what’s the mechanism for getting that information back to prospect research. So the formal mechanism is a contact report that i write within twenty four hours of the meeting meeting think memory things get lost, so i write it down very quickly. I get that into our database very quickly, and then i’ll often go and sit down with our prospect researcher when i’ve had a particularly illuminating meeting and share with her the types of things you wouldn’t necessarily put into writing. Yes, okay, and might that conversation include people that the person knows who? Maybe a c l u knows or doesn’t know your prospect knows them absolutely connectors and new prospects are things that regularly come up in our durney meetings that we share not just one on one with our prospect researchers, but as a major gifts team, we often have conversations about that and you’re your portfolio what’s the what’s, the age range of your portfolio. I have donors in their twenties, i have donors in their nineties, so we are full, full across the board are average, doner is in their sixties, but the age of our large donors is quickly decreasing, so we’re getting over forties and fifties, it has as much to do with our targeting and multi generational conversations. Is anything else? Okay? The conversations, the meetings that you have with women let’s, let’s focus on women that’s the subject of your seminar women in their eighties nineties how do you how do you talk about there? Differed or plant e-giving how do you open that conversation with them? So when somebody reaches their eighties and nineties, they’ve often already got their plans sorted out. So it’s a little late to be asking to be included in someone’s estate, although we certainly wouldn’t shy away from making the ask it is a little late, but if we if we talk about people women in there, maybe a little younger in their sixties and seventies, we’re talking about a similar generation. I’m often asking questions about what they want to leave behind as a legacy, and i’m asking questions about do they want their gifts and their legacy to reflect the life that the woman maybe shared with her husband? Is it about honoring his memory? Is it about honoring him or, as we often find, once the husband passes away, the woman has a different focus and wants to make gifts that matter. So asking about priorities and legacy and what they what message they want to leave behind to their families into the world that’s often what the conversation is about how do you manage it if you’re in that situation the husband has recently, he passed. Well, let me ask, is most of your portfolio women, or is there another proportion? I would say it’s probably sixty five percent women, okay, they’re slightly slightly when you’re when you’re dealing with a man or a woman whose spouses recently deceased, and you suspect that it was the spouse who was the primary giver, my mary-jo donorsearch too american civil liberties union. How do you approach that surviving spouse? Wait, i think the most important thing is we do approach them, we don’t assume because the spouse who was the instigator of the e-giving has deceased, we don’t see him that e-giving can’t continue, and i think that’s a very key point, you don’t just let people go away exactly, and we don’t leave them alone for months and years on end. Obviously you need to be respectful and not be there the next week, but we want to let them know that we’re still they are and that we still care and we’re still interested in them and so we try to have a meeting pretty quickly, and often it becomes a nostalgia conversation about this, about the husband, about why he gave, which will allow us to talk about what do you share those some of those same values? Are you as interested as your husband wass in civil liberties? That conversation can lead us while my husband was interested in a particular area, but i’m more interested in this area of your work, so we can recon target our messaging that’s good that’s a home run. They’re still interest in your work. Just a different part of it. Absolutely or we may find they may not be interested at all, at which point we can talk about the possibility of a gift in memory of they’re loved their loved one. Alright, so still keeping the door open until they absolutely say no more, no more giving to your organization, but it’s it’s nass ity tour you don’t really give up until you actually shown the door. How many years do you have in individual giving? I’ve been doing individual giving for fifteen years. Shows senior out senior senior gift officer c o l c a c l u is lucky to have you, samantha. Thank you. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven. I’ve been with samantha cohen. She is director of principle e-giving yes, at the american civil liberties union and samantha, i want to thank you very much for being a guest was a pleasure. It was a pleasure. Thank you very much. That was my pre recorded segment from june fund-raising day here in new york city. Right now, we’ll take a break, then, after the break, it’s, tony’s, take two, and then after that, learning, lobbying limitations with our regular legal contributors, so stay with me. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Yes. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed hi and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com are you concerned about the future of your business or career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office needs better leadership, customer service sales, or maybe better writing, are speaking skills. Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is in touch with us. Website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications, that’s the answer. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com hello there. Welcome back, it’s. Time for tony’s. Take two. My block post this week is thinking is underrated back in what for me were dark days when i was a lawyer practicing law i usedto have to account for my time in six minute increments tenths of an hour and there were lots of billing codes for things like court appearances and drafting motion for summary judgment and responding to motion to dismiss and telephone conferences. But there was never a billing code four thinking about your case, and i always thought that a lawyer’s best contribution to a client’s situation, which is usually a problem situation not always, but usually would be thinking, i’ve spent my time thinking about your case strategically and the attorneys who were involved in the other parties that are involved and your needs. And but there was never a billing code for thinking, so my day’s got much brighter because i only practiced law for about two years. And now, in the brighter sonny your days, i do a lot of thinking, and i don’t have to account for my time anymore in increments of six minutes and that’s what the block post? Is all about encouraging you to think just spend time thinking actively consciously about things that are moving and important to you, whether their personal or professional. In the blood post, i mentioned a lot of things just as examples that i spend time thinking of an and that i spend a lot of time on vacation and also on the subways, actively just giving thought to things in my life and that’s. What the block post thinking is underrated is about encouraging you to do the same, and that is tony’s take two for friday, september twenty third, two thousand eleven want to welcome jean takagi and emily chan are regular legal contributors. Jean takagi is principal of neo the non-profit and exempt organizations law group in san francisco. He edits the popular non-profit law blawg at non-profit law blogged dot com. Emily chan is an attorney at neo-sage, the principal contributor to the no non-profit law blawg, gene and emily. Welcome back. I think it’s a pleasure to have you. We’re talking this week about lobbying limitations. So what? Gene are some of the activities that could constitutent lobbying just so people are are conscious of what they might be doing that could become lobbying great question tony and way to think about a lot of wealth, so jobs loving is essentially attempting to influence legislation and the activities that might constitute lobbying our writing legislation, trying to meet with legislators or legislative bodies and influence how they might act on a proposed bill and things of that that nature. We might do that with a ballot measure and go out to the people or talkto our members or the public and tell them to contact their legislatures about specific bill constitutent ok, and can also include the use of social media and blogging. Absolutely, tony, great point, so blogging is just on dh social media use is just another way to communicate, and if you’re communicating to legislative bodies or legislators, legislators better have have their own social media sites or have their own blog’s and websites, and many of them do that khun b lobbying and if you are getting your members or you’re encouraging the public to engage in the same types of activities to influence legislation and contact legislators, that could all be lobbying using social media and blog’s and twitter and facebook and all the rats, okay, so i want to come back to social media in a few minutes after we’ve talked about some of the some more details because that’s that’s really interesting and also the point of the possibility of someone posting on non-profits site and whether that might be considered lobbying, but i think we need to do a little detail work first, and emily, there are laws, there are no, they’re not laws yet there are bills and acts under consideration now that non-profits might be interested in commenting on one way or another, right? Yes, tony so loving is getting some renewed or re energized attention as of late because of some things that were seeing on both the federal and state level recently on the federal level, there was the budget control act that was fined and that’s calling for one point five trillion dollars cut decided by that twelve person bipartisan committee, and certainly there are many non-profits better concern that they’ll be at the chopping block with that cut. Additionally, we just saw the proposed job will act. I’m spoken about which will limit the charitable deduction for certain we’ll be individuals, and then on the state level, we’ve seen some pushback in massachusetts. The attorney general earlier this year tried to propose legislation that would require prior approval by the attorney general’s office before non-profit could compensate executives, but these are the types of legislation that non-profits may want teo voice an opinion on or put out communications that reflect the view on that, encourage others to contact legislators or for themselves to go ahead and do that as well. Right? So we’re not just talking about federal law, but also and any state initiatives that could impact non-profits and that they might want to comment on and emily so how do we decide how much lobbying a non-profit can do? So in the internal revenue code for public charities under five, oh, one, seat three, it says god, public charities cannot engage in more than an insubstantial amount of lobbying and the default test for that is really all facts and circumstances. The irs will look at everything, including the time spent the resource is such expenditures on decide whether the organization has now stepped over that line into substantial lobbying activity that really leaves many organizations uncertain and scared in many. Ways, because there is no strict percentage or limit on that. So what organizations can do is elect to be measured by something called an expenditure test, which is under section five a one eighth of the internal revenue code. And unlike the people in this one, is measured only on expenditures. So it really gives organizations a better gauge as how to measure their own lobbying limits within compliance with the law. Okay, holy cow. All right, so that’s a ton of stuff. So? So you have to do lobbying that’s? Well, i shouldn’t say less than substantial because that’s not what’s in the code. So you have to do lobbying, that’s insubstantial or or less if you’re a five a one c three. Right? Okay. Cancel amount of total activities. Another way too. Wait, i’m sorry. Say that one more time in a substantial amount of total activities. Ok? And so then there are two different tests you’re saying to measure whether you’re you’re meeting that threshold or your or your exceeding it, right? Is that that’s standard? I should say that standard or you’re exceeding it. Is that right? Yes. That’s correct. The default. Substantial part. Okay. There’s the expenditure testament organizations can elect to be measured by filing a one page form. Okay, before we go into too much detail. So let’s talk about the substantial part test you say substantial, substantial part of what substantial part as activities. So it goes back to the language and five oh one c three and saying that organization can army engaged in an insubstantial amount of lobbying and there’s no exact equation as to how the irs will do this, it will just look at all facts and circumstances. Okay? And you said that this is the default test. So careful around jargon jail, because for lawyers, default is very clear. But for others may not necessarily be. That means that everybody’s covered by this test, unless they choose the other one, right? Yes. That’s correct. And then that’s, when they would file a form form fifty seven sixty eight and elect into the expenditure. Okay. And jean, let me turn to you and ask when should a non-profit or what types of non-profits should try tio or should apply to be under the expenditure test. Well, it’s going to be most non-profits tony that are going to be benefiting from from falling under that test. The five oh one h expenditure test really works out for all charities, particularly if their annual budgets are under seventeen million dollars a year. And i would think that that’s going to cover most of the people listening, okay, organization and how do you come up with that number? What is that? But under the substantial part test that emily was talking about again, if you don’t do anything, and that’s how the irs is going to look at your lobbying and they look at everything assembly was talking about and the general rule of thumb that people use that professionals use and trying to give guidance. Tio non-profits is saying that well, there is an old court case that five percent of your organizations, time and effort spent on lobbying. That’s not substantial. So it’s okay to do up to that amount, but anything over them that we’re not really sure of. So if we took a look at five percent that’s that’s going to be not a lot of money for a small charity for, you know, a million dollar charity we’re talking about a cz little as a five thousand dollars when we go into the expenditure test, their specific limits that we know we would need teo comply with in order to stay under that threshold, and the limits are pretty generous. Tony twenty percent of your first five hundred thousand dollars in expenditures in furtherance of your mission would be insubstantial. So that’s one hundred thousand of your first five hundred thousand dollars that you spend would be insubstantial fifteen percent of the next five hundred thousand ten percent of the next five percent of the next. It ends up being tapped at one million dollars. So when we look at that one million dollar mark, and then we go back to the substantial part, tess, we know that at about seventeen million dollars that’s when the substantial part tests and expenditure test looks to be fairly, even if we’re just looking at that five percent mark as the rule of fun rule of thumb with substantial part test okay, biggest benefit of the bible in h expenditure tests for most smaller non-profits tony is that all volunteer time spent on lobbying doesn’t count of lobbying? Volunteer time doesn’t spend doesn’t count, so so you can have lots of volunteers going out and knocking on lots of doors or leafleting and doing things, and none of that time counts. None of the expense of that time counts toward the calculation. Well, none of the volunteers time town on that calculations are only expenditures. That you might have in that equation would be factoring what staff time that you might be paying for to organize the volunteers and maybe some printing materials. But for low cost or no cost lobbying measures, the five of one age expenditure test is of great benefit. Okay, we’re going to take a break, and my voice just cracked like i’m fourteen years old, and when we return, we’re going continue learning, lobbying limitations. This is excellent detail to stay with us. Talking alternative radio, twenty four hours a day. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam lebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping hunters. People be better business people. Dahna this is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays, one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting do you want to enhance your company’s web presence with an eye catching and unique website design? Would you like to incorporate professional video marketing mobile marketing into your organization’s marketing campaign? Mission one on one media offers a unique marketing experience that will set you apart from your competitors, magnify your brand exposure and enhance your current marketing effort. Their services include video production and editing, web design, graphic design photography, social media management and now introducing mobile marketing. Their motto is. We do whatever it takes to make our clients happy. Contact them today. Admission one one media dot com talking. Lively conversation. Top trends. Sound advice, that’s, tony martignetti non-profit radio. And i’m ken berger from charity navigator. Welcome back to the show i’m with our regular legal contributors, jean takagi and emily chan. We’re talking about lobbying limitations. Gene, you mentioned that where this five percent is based on an old case. So how come it’s ok to rely on this old case? Because we don’t have anything else, tony so we don’t really have anything else to rely on. There may be some private letter rulings, but theres so specifics with facts and circumstance is that they don’t really touch on an overall level anymore. So all we have is that old court case that’s at five percent of time and resource is that that was insubstantial and okay, okay, and you invoked a lot of mathematics. You know, i went to law school because i’m poor at math, so but i was able to follow your explanation, but that’s about as far as i can go, so don’t bring in any algebra or anything. Just keep it tio addition and subtraction. Andi, i’ll be okay. So and what is the form that non-profit uses to elect the the more advantageous one that’s for small non-profits the five oh one h test it’s form fifty seven. Sixty eight and has emily mentioned one page form super easy to fill out one of the easiest forms that the irs has? Okay, fifty seven, sixty eight there’s no t on the end of that it’s not fifty seven. Sixty eighty no tony from from the earned income was that elearning yeah, i like the tee form. See if you can find some more of those that have a tv in them. Okay? And then let’s just based our conversations on those. So so we have to do research. Well, you do find all the forms and have teas, and then we’ll talk about that that’ll be the subject for future future shows that you’re on so let’s see, emily, how do we oh, so let’s, talk a little about social media now, okay, so now we know the two different tests. So emily suppose somebody posts puts a block post aren’t just comments on a block and a non-profit advocating, you know, opposition to the charitable deduction limitation that you were that you mentioned earlier. Does that fall under lobbying? Tony it’s really going to depend it’s going to depend on the facts and circumstances around that situation? Social media is certainly a place where the risk is there, um, and it really is going to fall on how the organisation is monitoring its own social media. So, for example, what kind of user agreements it has if it has a moderation policy, the dance that an organization takes on the way that they control their own platform is going to possibly affect whether the irs decides to say that that’s lobbying and challenge them and as well how courts are going to interpret the factions. There’s actually a really good resource that recently came out from alliance for justice called influencing public policy in the digital age. And it’s, a resource precisely on social media and a lobbying an election related activities. Ok, is that alliance for justice dot org’s? Do you know it isn’t free and it came out okay. Okay. It’s. Always troubling when you know when you when you guys say and i think this related to earned income also it depends on the facts and circumstances. That’s, it’s, it’s. So nebulous though, hyre. And you also said emily it it depends on the way the non-profit is monitoring their blawg. What do you mean there and could you could talk a little bit louder for us, too. There are different schools of thought as teo, how organizations should approach monitoring their own platform. So on one hand, organizations can decide to have moderating policies where they say they will take down information, not violate their community by lines of their terms. And if something were to happen, such as lobbying by a user who came on, you know, they may be able to show good faith, but at the same time they take on that responsability and apparently the administrative burden of monitoring that forum. On the other hand, there are organizations that choose not to moderate the forms, and they just put out a disclaimer that they don’t moderate it. They don’t stand behind necessarily what’s being put on there and it’s not a reflection of the organization. While that does take away some of that burden, then of going through in filtering the comments, it may be more difficult than to show that they are taking the responsibility to ensure that they’re not engaging in substantial amounts of lobbying lobbying, and it also creates a bigger risk that then, you know the free for all on their forum for whoever comes across it and whatever they want right there, you can’t just say we don’t monitor it and it’s not the opinion of of our non-profit that’s not going to be good enough? You can say that, but there is a question as to what position that puts you in certainly the law and the irs. They’re trying to catch up with these new avenues of social media and how to apply these very traditional rules to these new forms of media that, you know, create opportunities that weren’t previously available. Yeah, the laws are not keeping up with the changing digital landscape, certainly let’s. See so jean, did you find any there’s tea forms? Gene on the break, by the way, looking way had a two minute break it and i thought you come up with half a dozen by them. So there must be a reporting mechanism. If we’re concerned about the substantiality of lobbying activity, there must be some way that non-profit have to report backto irs. Absolutely so the form nine ninety is their annual information returns and whether you form filed the form nine, ninety or the nine ninety easy version you have to file a schedule c, which reports all of your lobbying activity and there’s two ways to report it. So if you are under that substantial part test, you didn’t do that that five o n h election and you fall into the substantial part test. You have to last her a lot of questions about whether used volunteers and what other resource is air being used for lobbying? But if you file that five o one h election, as i recommended for most organizations, especially smaller organizations, then you just record your expenditures and on the social media issue that really works out to your benefit as well, tony, because how much money did it cost to lobby when he just got a comment back from somebody that put in a lobbying position? It might have cost you almost nothing, right? So then you don’t worry about it so much if you paid that election and we’re talking here about the tax implications. But there is another federal requirement around lobbying activities to reaching that’s, right? So if you’re gonna be live ing on federal issues, you may also have to look at the registration and reporting requirements in the lobbying disclosure act, and those can be fairly complicated, but those air outside of sort of the tax requirements of around lobbying and you’ve got to talk with attorneys who understand the lobbying disclosure act on the federal level and possibly if you’re looking at state level issues or local level issues, you’ve got additional registration reporting with state and local authorities as well. Okay, so, uh, substantial, and what about the let’s? Say the pastor? This comes up in new york, a lot of pastor on a pulpit around election time on dh he or she is advocating for either one of the one of the ballot initiatives for against or for or against a candidate. Jean how does that fall into what we’re talking about? Well, when they’re talking about a ballot initiative, then we’re talking about a form of lobbying. So in the case of a pastor preaching to his congregation or even to the broader community we’re talking about typically grassroots flopping, which is lobbying where you’re going out to the people and telling them how to vote or tell their legislatures on how to vote sametz i’m going to actually back-up one step, however, if the people on a ballot initiative, if it the people themselves of the lawmakers and not the legislators, legislative bodies, then that would be called direct lobbying because you’re going directly to the people who make the law the people themselves. Well, but if you’re on the if you’re on the pulpit, you’re talking teo anaugh audience of congregants, and they’re all voters. What is that then? It’s still lobbying? So if you’re if you’re got a position on the law and telling them how to vote on the law, it would be lobbying the one thing that you mentioned that might be a segway for another show tony is, is when pastor on the pulpit start telling you who to elect for public office. Okay, now we’re talking about candidates, not issues, right? Okay? And in that case now we’ve got an election hearing activity and five a onesie three organizations, including churches, are prohibited from engaging in that type of political activity where they’re endorsing a candidate. Okay, that does sound very good. Why don’t we talk about that next month? Because there’s an election in november so we can talk about election earing and the limitations around that in october has that sound sounds perfect and, well, look way need that. Yeah, yeah. The subject is off the table if there’s no tea forme because tony form. So forget about it. You know we’ll do election next time. That’s. Emily chan and jean takagi emily gene, thank you very much. My pleasure, gene is principal of neo, the non-profit exempt organizations law group in san francisco. And emily chan is an attorney at neo. I want to thank both of them and also my first guest, samantha cohen from the american civil liberties union and all the very thoughtful people at fund-raising day who enabled us to have that booth on the exhibit floor to do the interview with samantha and and a bunch of others. Those interviews have been playing for the past couple months next week. It’s employee engagement deshele dorsey from changing our world is with me to talk about how your non-profit khun gained from company programs in giving, volunteering, mentoring and even loaning executives and also our regular prospect, researcher contributor maria simple, the prospect finder will be with me as well next week. You can keep up with what’s coming up! 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