457: Peer-To-Peer Peek & Poverty Porn – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2

This week: 

Peer-To-Peer Peek
Our panel from the Nonprofit Technology Conference shares an overview of community-driven fundraising. How do you plan for, inspire and activate your supporters? They’re Noah Barnett from CauseVox and Kenny Kane with Testicular Cancer Foundation. (Originally aired 7/6/18)

Poverty Porn
Amy Sample Ward returns to discuss the issues around graphic images and descriptions of poverty. How can you avoid the porn trap and white savior stereotyping, while telling compelling stories and advocating effectively? She’s our social media & technology contributor and CEO of NTEN. (Also from the 7/6/18 show)

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

426: DEI & Governance – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2This week:

DEI & Governance
Diversity, equity and inclusion run deeper than having folks of color on your board. Are you managing treatment, access and opportunity for non-white males? Gene Takagi and I talk through the issues, goals and methods. He’s our legal contributor and principal at NEO, the Nonprofit & Exempt Organizations law group.

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

422: Donor Centric – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2This week:

Donor Centric
To keep your donors, think and act like successful private sector companies. Curtis Bingham is founder of the Chief Customer Officer Council and a multi-award winning customer success strategist, conveying corporate methods to nonprofits.

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

404: Your Website Redesign & Overmarketing – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Oren Levine, director of innovation at International Center for Journalists; Lisa Ghisolf, founder & creative director of GizmoCreative Factory; and Emily Patterson, founder of BeeMeasure.  

Also, Amy Sample Ward, our social media contributor & CEO of NTEN, Nonprofit Technology Network.

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

397: Peer-to-Peer Peek and Poverty Porn – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Noah Barnett from CauseVox & Kenny Kane, CEO of Testicular Cancer Foundation. 

Also, Amy Sample Ward, our social media contributor & CEO of NTEN, Nonprofit Technology Network. 

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com

393: New Power – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guest this week:

Henry Timms, co-author of the book “New Power” and president & CEO of 92nd Street Y. 

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com

251: People Far Away & Files Far Away – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Lisa Jervis, principal consultant at Information Ecology & Jeanine Shimatsu, IT specialist for Forward Together.

Also, Tom Moberg, independent strategic technology consultant.

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com

129: Some Raise Money While Some Raise Hell & Pinterest and SlideShare – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Marcia Stepanek, founding editor-in-chief of “Contribute Magazine” and new media advisor to the New York University Heyman Center for Philanthropy.

Amy Sample Ward, membership director of Nonprofit Technology Network.

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio it’s that time again. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent i am your aptly named host. I very much hope that you were with me last week. Yes, i do, because last week was lead and matching gifts in your campaign to start professor john list from the university of chicago, chairs the economics department and founded the science of philanthropy initiative. There no longer must fundraisers rely on tradition and conventional wisdom in campaign planning because he shared a rigorous science to guide you around lead and matching gif ts also many matching corporate gif ts chuck longfield, chief scientist at blackbaud had lots of simple ways to increase your matching gif ts from corporations did you know that volunteer hours are also dollar matched by many? We started with sector benchmarking, and we went from there, and my interview with chuck longfield was recorded at blackboards bebe con conference last october this week, some raise money while some raise hell. I’m talking about women in philanthropy, with marshals to panic. She was founding editor in chief of contribute magazine and is the new media adviser to the new york university heimans center for philanthropy we’ll talk about limbong coleman leadership roles, traditional giving and how women are organizing themselves also, pinterest and slideshare amy sample ward returns she’s, our social media contributor and membership director of non-profit technology network and ten she shares how small and midsize non-profits can reap definite value from these lesser known social sites between the guests on tony’s take two, my podcaster on top i’ll tell you what i’m talking about, and i will thank you, my pleasure now, to welcome marshes to panic. She is new media advisor to the n u heimans center for philanthropy, and she also curates its annual speaker siri’s philanthropy three point oh, which explores disruptive innovation in the social good sector. It sounds like some organized anarchy. Anarchy pointed in the right direction. She teaches social media strategy. Yes, it may very well be totally okay. We’ll get teo talk about anarchy. I’m still trying to introduce you. Hold on there, marshal. She teaches social media strategy. You have a very lengthy bio. I was to get through this a cz well, a social enterprise. New media and cause video in the masters program at new york university she was, as i mentioned, founding editor in chief of contribute magazine, her upcoming book swarms. The rise of the digital antiestablishment published by little brown is due out later this year. And it’s actually because of that book that she couldn’t be in the studio because she’s interviewing someone for her book swarms very pleased to welcome marshes to panic. How are you? Thanks so much, tony. I’m just really delighted. Honored to be on yourself. Oh, it’s, my pleasure to have you. Thank you, marcia. Honored not too many people say that. Thank you. I hope you feel that way by the end you believe i’m sure you will. You believe that women are reshaping philanthropy? How is that what’s happening? Generally, you know, i didn’t use teo buy into claims that women somehow we’re you know, very different behaviorally and men in terms of their capacity for compassion and their willingness and generosity. But there’s some new research out and it’s very much triggered buy-in just in the economy and structural changes in the workplace that have given women a little more income over the last ten, twenty years, and since nine eleven, we’re we’re starting to see some measurable differences in the way women spend money in terms of the charitable contributions that they make, so that there are some differences that are starting to emerge here. There’s certainly other differences to in-kind of what those new income numbers are spawning in the non-profit industry, but armored and okay, and we’ll have time to talk about those, so you feel this is mostly economically driven? I think a lot of it is economically driven in terms of just the numbers with regard to the money uh given and how that those contributions different, for example, in the highest e-giving levels of people who give generally men and women, uh, baby boomer aged women are more likely to give them their male counterparts in all giving levels three percent or more, or they’re coming down to charity among people who do that. Male baby boomers and older, single headed households are nearly two times it’s, likely than men to give to charity. So that’s that says an age when most women are saving and have significant savings and disposable income and that’s even happening even as a result of women not getting paid is most statistically on the average than men. So it’s pretty significant. Okay, but there’s also interesting developments around organizing and advocacy. Yeah, very much so because of some of these economic trends, but also as a factor of globalization and particularly social media, technology and internet technology in general, we’re seeing some behavioral changes. First of all, it could be a simple as ah ah lot more charities targeting their solicitation campaigns more directly. Tau women. I know a lot of your listeners. Now, united way has now one hundred thirty seven women’s leadership councils that have raised something like nine hundred eighty five million dollars just over the left twelve years creating marshal those those leadership councils are our volunteers. They’re volunteermatch women supporters, yes, and doner groups. So what the united way has done? Uh, kind of piggybacking the general trend and women’s income and changing numbers and how much they’re spending on charity decided to tap into that trend and organize some of these councils. Teo, do more engagement around women’s not only volunteerism, but something like fund-raising as well and what’s. Interesting about that is, uh, this so called tiffany circle, which is an all female. Network created by the red cross, for example, another organization, uh hey has been started not just by the transport by social media networks that have popped up around some of these activities, so a lot of places they’re using a combination of social media and these economic trance really bolster their fundrasing activities, and we’re gonna have a chance to talk a little later on about women organizing themselves, not needing umbrella organization to do it. But, you know, around some of the controversies, like what happened to komen and rush limbaugh’s comments, and so we’ll get a chance talk about women organizing themselves, as i said, not even needing that kneading the big organization, but just coming together on the social sites let’s talk about some of the social change and social enterprises that you’re seeing women engaged in. Yeah, they’re concurrent with these other changes on certainly partly a factor of economic wealth. Growth among women is that a lot of women, particularly on wall street and other very in the financial services field, are really being a critical force behind the creation of pretty much a majority of social enterprises that are out there. The skull. Forum for, uh, global entrepreneurship has done on international study on this and seeing that at least half it’s not up to as high as seventy percent, and some regions of the new enterprises that have been started have been done by women, women who have earned independently of their thousands um uh, who are seeing that the needs community isn’t as fully developed as it ought to be around new issues of concern to these cohorts, such as women’s, self esteem, women and girls, self esteem, women, education issues. Now, these air getting much more focused thanks to a lot of the social enterprises on march for-profit businesses for good, if you will, that coming online. Also seeing a lot of female boomer women burned, creating films, getting into the social good film space and making some very interesting documentaries that are here about women helping women and trying to move the needle a little bit on education and their film initiatives that are also being used to raise a lot of money for certain non-profits abigail disney surely johnson, some of the big entrepreneurs are involved in these things on there, really successful in terms of measuring impact. Are there? Are there specific documentary titles? You khun you convention for us? Yes. Uh, shirley johnson made something about kicking the ball, which is about women’s basketball group. We’ve got abigail disney was working in liberia. Um, we’ve got some recent documentaries that are are being funded by again the women run fledgling fund, which is a foundation, and it’s about women and girls in the slums of calcutta being turned into activists and it’s a very compelling story. Uh uh, all sorts of new films i’m attending here to see for the first time i’m in washington, d c today as well, and i’m interviewing for the book as well as screaming some films that american university conference on social media that matters and this is focusing, i’m still making efforts. So again, you couldn’t you couldn’t be in the studio because you’re in washington, d c watching a movie that’s what you’re saying, i see a film, they have probably hard working the minute you’re seeing argo and lincoln, i’ll bet that’s why you’re in washington? Because they’re not playing in new york anymore, okay, we have just a minute before a break, so i don’t want to really get into anything brand new, too deep. But, of course, you’ll still be with me after the break. When and i want to make sure that what listeners understand, we talked about social enterprise, we’re talking about often cos right, that air, social, socially oriented, social good business is sort of. We’re talking about socially, social good enterprises that have been begun with the primary purpose now so much of raising money for stakeholders, but for raising the bar on social impact wielding an impact that’s measured first of those companies over organized to be accountable to those kinds of and our wii just very briefly before break, we necessarily talking about corporations or these could be not-for-profits also, these could be not-for-profits for-profit non-profit hybrid organizations and then for-profit organizations, but it’s the way that they’re organized on around what they promise to deliver, i understand what their outcomes are, not not necessarily one hundred percent profit, if there, if their profit mathos lately, okay, we’re going to take a break and when we return, of course, after this marchenese to panic stays with us, and i hope that you do, too, talking alternative radio twenty four hours. Are you confused about which died it’s, right for you? Are you tired of being tired? How about improving your energy strength and appearance? Hi, i’m rick, a keg, holistic nutrition and wellness consultant. If you have answered yes to any of my questions, contact me now at n y integrated health dot com, or it’s, six for six to eight, five, eight five eight eight initiate change and transform your life. Are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership, customer service sales, or maybe better writing, are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications. That’s, the hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com dafs welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I have to send live listener love. Now is the time let’s start anyway. Taipei, taiwan. Ni hao, changsha, china. Shanxi, china, hi bay, china. Beijing, china knee. How going out to china and taiwan, fork. Wacha, japan. Konnichiwa, and new bern, north carolina. What’s going on there. More live listener loved to come their arm or live listeners out there. Marcia yeah, let’s, let’s, talk a little about the a new organisation called the girl effect they have on there on the opening page of their website that what they say exactly, that women are the most powerful force for change on the planet. You what do you think about that? No, i got this. Let me say that hyperbole is shared by by because i was wondering how about even like, like men, maybe i don’t know they’re not a good food what’s interesting about the girl effect, though, is kind of the structure behind it, and we were just talking a moment ago about social enterprise and so forth. What the girl fact represents is is a really progressive and very successful partnership. Example of great collaboration in the do gooder space between the noble foundation, which is run by the bucket children warren buffett’s, kids corporation, nike and it’s ah it’s foundation arm and ah partnership with hundreds of non-profits that have it’s part of their mission statement helping women and girls to achieve change, whether it’s in the education space of the art stays or healthcare. It’s a partnership where ah, a very good shorts film was funded, its animation, but it basically finally connects. The dots taking it from hyperbole to show why funding women and girls projects actually affects everyone ah, and affects everyone in a very local way. And so it’s in a very effective messaging tool that kind of breaks through the the problems that a lot of these issues had had in the past, where it sounds awfully one sided, the girl fact does a wonderful job of making this ah, great messaging, peace around thie economic impact on everyone of the lack of educating women and girls, and some of the status around the world. Dahna uh, the lowly status love women hold around the world. So it’s it’s a great burger, and what it does is it kind of lends this little short film to a lot of organizations that couldn’t otherwise afford to make it and lets them put on their websites and interface that helps them to raise micro cash, you know, ten dollars, twenty dollars, right after people to do the film online, they’ve done ability, teo, donate to some of the causes that have been vetted. And though it’s just a wonderful campaign that is now finally being copied in other parts of the sector so we hope to see more of that kind of collaboration in the future. In fact, we’re seeing a lot of micro giving among women organizing themselves around social enterprise. Yes, we are a aa lot of this thie evolution of social networks, social media still relatively, very new, but as people get together and now they found each other online and now they exchange, you know, kind of information about the trivia are the important bits of their lives. Now, the next evolution is the first getting people together to make change or around certain issues folks i care about and what we’re starting to see is on what we saw a lot of last year were the social network, some of them that are very strong, many of them led by women being able to make a difference, either in defense of, uh, an action taken by an organization or to bring up some concerns that hadn’t been brought up otherwise and holding some of these traditional non-profit organizations accountable. And, of course, the the leading edge that was the komen foundation controversy where coming foundation had decided to be fund-raising goods breast cancer testing on dh without telling a lot of its membership, and when it finally freaked out, a lot of folks got online a lot of women and started protesting thiss was an example of women organizing themselves through the social networks and very rapidly yes, absolutely, and it was a very successful protest, and it wasn’t so much the significance here isn’t so much whether you believe that that decision was the right or wrong one it was looking, and there are social networks out there holding traditional organizations and non-profits accountable for their actions and ways that has never been before. And the rapid response of some of these networks to some of these decisions has really encouraged a lot of organizations to start really getting serious about engaging your supporters and their networks in new ways so that everybody does feel that their part of the decision making process and there is a new level of accountability achieved not only holding organizations accountable but individuals for there flippant and ah antagonistic, i’d say, remarks rush limbaugh, when he accused you really accuse nobody eats cited a law student was a prostitute because she wanted funding for birth control to be included. In health care and there was a huge backlash. Yeah, there was an internet firestorm over that in just three days. That firestorm was ableto porcelain about to apologize, not once but twice to the woman he had called a flat was the one of the quotes, okay? Ah, and he lost nearly one hundred advertisers right in that in that, uh napor so we’ve seen that these swarms, if you will, of the social networks that have been highly developed and that have a riel sustainability to them, are able to work very quickly when they’re organized. One of my colleagues, a friend of emmett has called these accountability networks actually because they’re social networks and they are always there, but they can get into action very quickly. Uh, if one of them are influential, members of these networks decides to call them into action. So it’s somethingto watch it’s a phenomenon now, but it’s becoming replicable, and we’re seeing a lot of this kind of action over. Yeah, and so this is what you’re calling swarms of women in this case and it’s not women, are not the only ones active actively engaging but that’s that’s the third today, but one of those air swarms saw another one very well done stop sopa campaign, but to delay a vote by the u s congress that would diminish him internet freedom, at least for now. And, uh, it’s, really a new form of activism that is used social media to coordinate swift action around the specific goal. And it’s it’s it’s significant because it’s, uh, much more to do with the ability of new players and the advocacy sector toe work collectively and successfully kind of outside the non-profit sectors long established structures fired-up alternative goals. So it’s it’s something that all organizations want to start infusing more with their supporters in new ways but also so constructively trying to really be able to prove that they’re having an immeasurable impact. A lot of donors now are saying, what have you done for us? We’re the cause lately, and a lot of organizations are now using the social media tools to measure impact, or at least to get a more specific numerical handle on the work that they are doing so that they are able to not only convince people of their value, but to be able teo create partnerships on new levels to achieve more social impact over time marchenese to panic is the new media advisor to the n u heimans center for philanthropy, and her upcoming book is will be swarms. The rise of the digital anti establishment, and you can follow marcia on twitter. She is at claw cause pardon me at cause global ah, marcia let’s, let’s focus a little more on the on the actual, more traditional e-giving and the way women are being more generous essentially than men, it’s a it’s a little more about that. Yeah, even though women in general are earning less than men and have less money in retirement and are generally outliving their spouses, these recent studies on their standing for charity demonstrate that young women, certainly, and especially boomer women, older women in particular are just more likely to give and to give more to charities and then beyond that, there’s, also a behavioral that women in a recent survey by indiana university also said that they they want teo uh, not just have more impact on spending. They want to be more involved in the decision making and indeed, a lot of the rise of some of these new organizations on social enterprises, uh, is due to women wanting to bypass, too simply writing a check to existing organizations but setting up a kind of a bee metrics around specific initiatives that they themselves want to see. And as long as they have the means and some of these new networks, especially on wall street and elsewhere, to accomplish that, they’ve been racing to set that up. That slowed a little bit during profession, but still a very vital force. A lot of people are saying that this income situation for women and this this habit of giving mohr, especially among older women, is very likely to continue. By twenty thirty, for example, fifty four percent of american boomers will be women. And because of their sheer numbers and the social changes that have occurred as they grew up, they have a significant impact on society through their beliefs and attitudes and behaviors and have us already. And so now, as they get older and more charitable on dh, i think we’re seeing the start of some more further behavioral changes among women towards charitable organization. So i think that’s a little bit of good. News you said earlier that the social networks are relatively young, but i hear people say how sick and tired they are a facebook or or twitter sometimes are these are these social networks with us forever? I think some forms of them are, and certainly is they morph and evolve our use of them well, morgan of all hope, the more distinctive things about social networks and social platforms that we’ve seen over and over again is that the people using them tend to define how going tio improve them over time. Ah, facebook, for example, everybody’s kind of getting organizations on facebook now so much personal things now that but seeing how they used them toe left bitch events and, you know, do pr in a different way, certainly, uh, we’re also seeing a rise in the use of private social networks, kind of a private facebook that go under certain names like ning’s o r other certain other platforms that are being set up so that it’s kind of like a private, charitable, uh, type of facebook that’s membership only on some organizations and non-profits they’re using this to great effect, one in particular is the provocative understand veterans organization? Marcia, marcia, you broke up a little bit, say they say the name of the organization again. It’s called i a v stand veterans iraq, afghanistan veterans association a okay, i look, they’ve dahna they set up a peer-to-peer private social network, uh, that bear as long as you’re in that network, you know, they don’t want this isn’t like vietnam veterans or korean, more veterans for eighteen, nineteen, twenty year old folks just and this particular war and are facing some very unique challenges, thanks largely to the health care technology being used to save them from injuries that in previous years killed and so there are unique challenges for them coming home and a lot of challenges always for veterans coming home. So combined with their existing use murcott given their age and their experience before going off to war ah, they are very successfully putting together these private networks is veterans to talk to each other, and they’re subsets like women’s subsets like people who were injured from a certain type of injury and you get on them by giving a password. You are pre qualified so you you it’s not just anybody, is not your fourth grade teacher finding you it’s a private conversation that built trust and credibility among the members and as it moves toward a membership model it’s also proving to be a very sustainable non-profit kind of model using social networks to serve those in need buy-in involving an engaged, those in need not just writing checks, marcia, just just a minute or so left, i have to ask you, what is it you love about this work and the and the research that you’re doing go how people, uh, can hold power accountable in new and constructive ways. I love how this technology couples to be advocacy sector e-giving voice teo so many more people who otherwise were not involved. These full social media, the, uh, the internet has democratized philanthropy, and in such is turning traditional organizations on their beer. I think it all about here. Social change, enormous empowerment absolutely marchenese to panic is new media advisor to the n u heimans center for philanthropy. Look for her book coming out later this year, swarms the rise of the digital antiestablishment it’ll be published by little, brown and she’s at caused global on twitter marsha thank you so much for being a guest, my honor and pleasure. Thanks, tony it’s. Been a pleasure having you right now. We will go away for a minute or two, and when we come back, it’s, tony’s, take two, and then amy sample ward is with me, and we’re going to talk about pinterest and slideshare stay with me. They didn’t think dick tooting getting ding, ding, ding ding. You’re listening to the talking alternate network e-giving. E-giving cubine are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Hi, i’m ostomel role, and i’m sloan wainwright, where the host of the new thursday morning show the music power hour. Eleven a m. We’re gonna have fun. Shine the light on all aspects of music and its limitless healing possibilities. We’re going invite artists to share their songs and play live will be listening and talking about great music from yesterday to today, so you’re invited to share in our musical conversation. Your ears will be delighted with the sound of music and our voices. Join austin and sloan live thursdays at eleven a. M on talking alternative dot com. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Schnoll i’m chuck longfield of blackbaud. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Hi there and welcome back. More live listener love! Montgomery, illinois. Tustin, california. Littleton, colorado. Atlanta, georgia. And two unidentified in somewhere in the united states of america. You’re masking your i p s we know who you are, i’m just since you’re masking, i won’t say who you are, but we know who you are. I’m just telling you that we know here you’re not you’re not you’re not hiding from us, but two unidentified on dh for our listeners in china, all those cities in china that are listening, i said earlier. Happy new year, gung hay fat choi also xero chou korea and seoul, korea on yo haserot it’s, time for tony’s take two, my podcasts are on top and i’m very grateful to you for that. This show was what’s hot in two categories on itunes very recently non-profits and government and organizations and my podcast that which is a monthly for the chronicle of philanthropy fund-raising fundamentals. That was a top podcast in non-profits the’s honors are enormously fleeting. I don’t know, maybe they last five minutes, maybe their last an hour, but they go fast, so i took screenshots and you could see the photographic documentary evidence is on my blogged at tony martignetti dot com. But more important than that, i want to thank you for rating the show. We had the five hundred stars campaign. Thank you very much for raiding the show on itunes more than doubled the number of ratings and i’m sure that’s what made the show trend in itunes. And there was some carryover effect to the to the other podcast to the fund-raising fundamentals that i do. So i thank you. Um, my next guest would caution me that there’s more to true social engagement than numbers and and bumps and and peeks in listenership. So i i take that seriously there there was a lot more to that than engagement. But i thank you for being engaged to the level that you have been so far, and hope to get you even further along mohr, that on my block at tony martignetti dot com. And that is tony’s take two for friday, february fifteenth, the seventh show of this year amy sample ward she’s, the membership director at non-profit technology network. And ten her she co authored social by social, but even newer than that her very new book, also co authored, is social change any time everywhere with forward by two time guest on this show, craig marko is the founder of craigslist he’s been with us twice amy’s blawg is that amy sample, ward dot or ge and she’s on twitter at amy r s ward on twitter. That’s right? I’m going to finish the sentence without without without twitter id, and we know that the army’s rene amy rinascente ward welcome back. Thank you for having me. It’s a pleasure every month. I’m always surprised you allow me back every time. No, you shouldn’t be. I make you feel that in secure. I assume that there’s like a jargon jail downstairs. No, no, no, you’re you’re you’re pretty good about it. You’re quite good were very conscious of jargon jail amy’s here with her little field notebook it’s, an adorable little yellow forty eight page notebook. It’s branded from the state of texas. I don’t know. What were you in texas lately? Is that where you got your little fuel? No. It was given to me as a thank you by a friend, david jnf, who lives in austin. And i don’t even know why he was thanking me, but he gave me this little field notebook and it’s the perfect size it’s about phone sizes, let me ask you, you have co authored or contributed to five books by my count, when you’re going to do one on your own? Yeah, i’m hopeful that maybe that one is next, okay? And then there’s none of the like, you know, trying to interpret someone else’s edits like, for better or for worse, i could just come out of my brain and we’ll see what happens. It will be very, very much better. We’re looking forward to the solo effort, but we’ll celebrate your book coming up. In fact, i’m going to you’re going to one of your book launch events, which we’ll talk about later on act for the end later this month for those who are in the new york city area, but right now we’ll talk about pinterest and and slideshare um, how did these how do these fit into social change and social engagement? Well, i think that they’re really great examples of platforms that actually have tons of use, but organizations haven’t, for the most part translated how individuals air using that tool to how they as an organization would use it. You know, facebook’s pretty straightforward, you have an individual profile, you have an organizational page like you know, how to get started. But with these tools where there’s there’s, no difference between who the the user profile is, organizations are a little bit more, you know, without boundaries, there’s too many options, so they don’t really know how to engage. But organizations that have tried or are using the tools in part of their content strategy are really seen engagement there. I don’t know which one you want to talk about for just let’s talk about why don’t you explain what pinterest is? Because maybe so little known to some people that they don’t even know that exactly what it is? Sure, so pinterest is free to use social platform just like facebook or anything else where it is free to use, but that means you are than the product on and it’s very visual driven so it’s all about collecting on a pin board that’s virtual, just like you would maybe, you know, in your office pictures, recipes, anything on the web so whenever you pull in a block post, whatever images associated that block post would be actually what people see on your board, they wouldn’t see the block video also yet exactly. I have a pin board for women leaders of non-profits excellent on video, but it’s video zoho contributor of them speaking so just a quaint listeners that video can be as well. And then what you’ll see on that pin board if it’s videos would just be a screenshot, right like this still like you would when you had a youtube page and the video isn’t played ok? Yep. On dso you, khun, even though you have this pin board, you can actually have unlimited pin board, so maybe i have a pin board for conferences i want to attend, but then i also have a pin board like the most frequent one i see is recipes that i’m going to cook one day, but i’m never actually gonna cook like that whole sentence isn’t the title, but it’s like recipes and you know this person’s never cooking next i wish list. Recipe list. Exactly. All right. So how are charities? Engaging? Constituents were around around pinterest. Yeah, their organizations have you. Know, as you can imagine, tried different things, short campaigns, longer standing content and something that’s interesting, and i know you have the links to some infographics to share on the block. Pinterest has about eighty percent of that content is repent content. So anyway, you know, if i went to your pinterest board say, if it was the average boring, you know, think about hypothetical i would never i would never dane never squander my precious time with tony’s interest account because of pin boards are so mundane and superficial and dull, but if you if you stumbled on it buy-in accidentally, you clicked on it stumbles away there. Um, eighty percent of the content across pinterest is repent, meaning someone else pendant first, and you’ve just, you know, reposted on your on board, so but like you said, you’re, you’re bored that’s all about interviews with non-profit women leaders, i’m sure that you were the one that did that interview are or were some of the original? Yeah, so they’re going to show up all over pinteresque, but it’s because you were the source and so thinking about that at, like, how much content is shared amongst the platform where is very little of that content for people? Time is spent clicking on things, and i’m going to read websites. You know, i think organizations naturally think, well, this is, you know what has put up a bunch of great images to our website and we’ll drive a bunch of web site traffic, but that’s not the case, people are using the platform within that within the place. Yeah, so eighty percent are re pens? Yeah, that’s enormous. Yeah, do you have a corresponding stat for any buy-in a chance for twitter. How much of twitter is re tweets versus i? I don’t have a twitter for tumbler, which is a more similar platform to pinterest because it’s ah it’s like blogging but it’s much, you know, micro style and it’s about nine out of ten temblor posts are re blogged so it’s very similar in that way where people that are on the platform or just, you know, following each other and finding great things and it’s more a matter of like, i want to have the best curated recipe board versus the on ly recipe board, you know, so it’s it’s much more shared eso organizations are taking advantage of that in different ways. One one example that i really like. Because it’s very clearly aligned with the mission is city of hope, which is an l, a based a hospital research center, etcetera. They have a campaign called mushrooms for hope because mushrooms are shown to have really great health benefits, especially for people at risk of or with cancer. So they have a mushrooms for hope board that’s. All great ways, you know, recipes to use mushrooms, because we know everybody in there. Mom has a recipe board on pinterest. So why not, you know, curate all those different ways to use mushrooms so that people will re share it again in the platform and ultimately it’s, not about them knowing who city of hope is it’s about them eating mushrooms, right? You know, but they’re using that for exposure exact recipe sharing community. Exactly. Here’s a great super great cream of mushroom soup recipe. Right. Very smart. S o just to make it explicit. So people follow your boards, right? People can follow your whole board. They could also follow just you. And then whatever board here pinning tio, they could get those. Notifications or they could just never follow you and find your your pin through someone else, you know, and then see, allow just a great mushroom recipe, you know, and then click through. And actually the original post was was from your account i love those clever ideas that yeah, that shit’s a smart one. Yeah, another example of maybe not a specific example, but a way that, oh, our strategy for charities to engage on pinterest yeah, a different take on that that i i think is on interesting one is n w f national wildlife federation has a campaign for, you know, getting outside and and has a big, like camping go the great outdoor camp. I’m goingto mess up the name of their campaign, but so they have ah, aboard all about that where they’re pinning other people’s content about campaign so it’s not even their content, but again, it’s it’s making those people in the community that are talking about the campaign feel like they’re in the spotlight because this is a board of all those other people talking three national organization has exactly exactly bored or my my my pen? Yeah, exactly. Engagement. Yeah, exactly. Two way street let’s. Talk about slideshare. Sure. Because always shoot. There was something i want to ask you about. Interest. It’s, overwhelmingly women. Yes. I see different statuses. Somewhere, anywhere between two thirds tow. The mashable said maybe it’s this high is ninety seven percent. So somewhere in there, overwhelmingly women. What should we be capitalizing on that? What should we be doing with that? Yeah, i think part of just to address the point, you’re making that all the numbers being a little different. And part of that is if it’s actual user sign ups versus active users and again, different platforms in different data. Analysts consider active user as, like logs in once a month or is on it for an hour a day like which one of those is active, you know? And once you get wherever you fall in that active definition scale that’s where it starts skewing much more women. So actual user accounts are a little bit more typical of social networks, but the active is much more female. Okay on. And so i think organizations can take advantage of that in those are, you know, the examples where two shared but also just remembering that, you know, even like marcia was saying women want to be making the decision of where money goes, women want to be, you know, figuring out the causes that they care about and engaging with them, so figuring out ways that isn’t just, um, you know, a generic call to action for everyone, but you’re figuring out, what are the the women boomers in your community interested in doing? And maybe it has it it’s not, you know, all about city of hope and all about all of the life saving measures and research ugo but it’s about mushrooms, you know, and you like, let that be the thing for them? S o i think really, figuring out who your community is back to some of the stuff we’ve talked about in previous months and then focusing really specifically and letting them either drive that content and you’re just re, you know, you’re collecting that o r just taking their lead? Excellent, we’re goingto take a short break, and when we come back, amy sample ward stays with me, we’re going to talk about slideshare stay with me, too. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Schnoll are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. And you, sample ward, is our eyes, our social media contributor and our social media scientist. I doubled that id number that she’s too modest to say that i did that on dh. We’re talking about slideshare what let’s acquaint listeners. What is slideshare great? So slideshare is ah ah, platform, where you can post content that you want to share and it’s called slideshare because it’s it’s most prominent feature is posting slides like a power point presentation or a slide deck that you would be using in a, you know, at a conference are in a board meeting or whatever for count for mac users, or use kino exactly like, you know. And then i translated over the power point, exactly little little parenthetical for mac users. Or what does whatever google aps calls there? Oh, yeah. Anyway, so that’s that’s, the most dominant features people posting slides and you can find them and review them and share them. But you can also embed them. And so you could post slides from your conference and then on your blogged have them embedded so people, you’re not just having to write out what you said. You khun embed it right there and people can flip through the slides. But what’s great is that you can also use it for all kinds of content. So do you use your organization? Is part of your new campaign launching, you know, with an infographic about why you’re running this campaign? Well, you could upload that info graphic, you know as a pdf or whatever to two slideshare embedded in your block. Have people share it just like they do. Slides and track track the shares that way. Okay, you know, if you wished you could also use that info graphic on pinterest. Exactly. Okay, on dh that and you know that goes for all kinds of other content. Maybe you have a new orientation, you know, to sheet that you give to your volunteers, will. You could post it there and then also post slides that you’re goingto review with them of this is how to be a volunteer for our organisation. This is what we do, this is why we have volunteers. This is what the volunteer job looks like, and that way you could just send them those two links they don’t have to download anything they don’t have to, you know, have have any special software, whether they’re on the phone or they’re you know, on a computer they could read or digest those materials ahead of time, show up and be ready to volunteer, and you don’t have to be emailing large files were about exactly top box or some other bright, just a link exactly. Now i’ve so in a few places slideshare called youtube for slide shows. Yes, it’s not as anyone here is popular as youtube. Well, yeah, definitely not as popular as you tube in that when you look at youtube stats, basically, you would think humans do nothing but watch youtube video that there really is a ridiculous thing. So so slideshare has about three billion views a month, so that’s still sized amglobal yeah, yeah, and and i think something social. Engagement is not just in the numbers, though, right? And i think something that’s interesting as faras actual of what the numbers say is that of all of the different social platforms facebook, youtube, whatever slideshare is foreign away, much more popular amongst business owners, organizational leaders, you know, executive level staff of different kinds of organization. So hyre go ahead. So i was just going to say, you know, if you want to make sure that you spent a lot of time preparing something for some funders that you were going to meet with, you know, you made the slide deck showing them who you are made it really clear the impact you make. Why not post that for free on a platform where other, you know, leaders in the sector could come across your sides and say that’s? Exactly. We’ve been looking for someone like you to partner with exactly, and what i was saying, slideshare is owned by linked in. Yeah. So not surprising that it’s i guess it’s gravitated toward business and you can you can embed slideshare content in your personal yet or your or your organizational linked in page yet? Yep. You khun just connect them on dh from from your linked in profile, and it’ll even just automatically pull in your most recent slides or uploads, you know, if you were doing something else so all a very easy way to embed large what maybe large files? Because especially if you’re doing power point or keynote and you have video and or there’s photos in each slide yeah, very large, you get those very large files other other ways, you know, just ask you generally other ways that charity’s could be using slideshare or other tips that you have for for engaging through slideshare well, i think that the training is really what what i’ve seen organizations do well with most often is there already creating training materials, whether it’s for volunteers, it’s for a certain department, you know, and using slideshare is away too. Put those up there, how’s them for free, you know, think about it like youtube, where even though you’re goingto use that video for your campaign or in your marketing and you’re going to embed that video on your website, you’re still going to post it on youtube so that all that organic traffic that could maybe come across it can still come in. And so posting those materials about, you know, the great things that you’re doing with social media at your organization and here’s, you know, kind of your overviewing training materials than other people that are interested in either your organization or social media in general could find that come to you and say, great, i want to get involved with your efforts, so i think thinking about it as the place you know, like youtube, where you, you how’s the content even though you’re using it elsewhere because you still just get the benefit from the other platform. And as google and other search engines index the the content that’s in your slides, it’s, sort of a wayto ona ona niche because you’re you’re slideshare going too, so dense with key notes that are just i mean, i’m sorry keywords that are necessarily embedded in there because it was part of your part of your presentation. Yeah, way of sort of owning a very narrow niche that your expert well and it’s it’s great for search engine optimization, you know, they’re one of their three highest sources is organic google searches so if i am, you know, working on a proposal for these are the five strategies for ending homelessness in new york city, and i’m pitching this to some thunders, and i want to find you know what? I’m going to start a coalition post it there because if someone else is looking just on a search for how do we end homelessness in new york city? And they get to my presentation now, i’m i’m creating credibility for myself and setting up our organization as the leader on that cause. Any sample ward should membership director at non-profit technology network and ten her new book is social change anytime everywhere, and i am going to a february twenty eighth book launch at five thirty at, which is at the planned parenthood federation quarters. You want to say a little about how people can can attend that if they’re if they’re in the new york city area? Yes, i think if you go to social change any time dot eventbrite, dot com something i will come. We started your blogged way started any sample ward dot or yes, i will put it up there. It’s not up there now, okay? Or put it. On the show’s facebook page, facebook page and lengthen group grayce forget linked in okay, yes, but that happens to be on february twenty eighth at five thirty, yes, and we’ll have books to sell but also will be doing a presentation just about ten, really tactical tips that people can take away from it, too. I’m gonna be there. I’m gonna see how many other people think you’re the social media scientists like i do think, of course, thanks for having me pleasure, my thanks also to martius to panic. More live listener love philadelphia p a you joined us a little bit late, but welcome next week. J love, ceo of bloomerang we’re going talk about donorsearch tension, you know that it’s, much cheaper and easier to keep a donor than to replace one j love has insights to help you, and that might actually have something to do with engagement using the social networks. Somebody should write a book about that and maria semple, the prospect finder and our prospect research contributor, returns she’s our doi n of dirt cheap and next week maria has to free sites to help you get serious with prospect research natural. You’re gonna have to listen and a reward we’re listening this long, and staying at the podcast is far i’m giving away two, three hundred forty nine dollars one year subscriptions to the atlas of giving remember rob mitchell was on a couple of weeks ago atlas of giving you khun benchmark your own giving get custom reports through this three hundred forty nine dollars value. One live listener one podcast right now live listener go to pick a platform, but i’m on facebook go to facebook! Go to the shows, facebook page and post i’m listening live to non-profit radio first person who does that on the facebook page gets one these three hundred forty nine dollars subscriptions and first podcast listener who does that? Also on facebook? I’m listening to the podcast of non-profit radio you will also win. Our creative producer was claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is our line producer shows social media is by regina walton of organic social media and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. I hope you’ll be with me next friday one to two p m eastern at talking alternative dot com finding things to getting ding, ding, ding ding. You’re listening to the talking, alternate network waiting to get in. Duitz nothing. You could hi, i’m donna, and i’m done were certified mediators, and i am a family and couples licensed therapists and author of please don’t buy me ice cream are show new beginnings is about helping you and your family recover financially and emotionally and start the beginning of your life will answer your questions on divorce, family court, co parenting, personal development, new relationships, blending families and more dahna and i will bring you to a place of empowerment and belief that even though marriages may end, families are forever join us every monday, starting september tenth at ten a m on talking alternative dot com are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications? Then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s two one two seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way look forward to serving you! You’re listening to talking alt-right network at www. Dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays, one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting are you fed up with talking points, rhetoric everywhere you turn left or right? Spin ideology no reality, in fact, its ideology over in tow no more it’s time. Join me, larry shop a neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven easter for the isaac tower radio in the ivory tower. We’ll discuss what you’re born you society, politics, business and family it’s provocative talk for the realist and the skeptic who want to know what’s really going on? What does it mean? What can be done about it? So gain special access to the ivory tower. Listen to me very sharp your neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven new york time go to ivory tower radio dot com for details. That’s, ivory tower radio dot com e every time i was a great place to visit for both entertainment and education. Listening. Tuesday nights nine to eleven. It will make you smarter. Told you.

126: Grant Writing Revealed – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guest this week:

Jana Jane Hexter, author of “Grant Writing Revealed: 25 Experts Share Their Art, Science and Secrets.”

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

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Durney hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent i’m your aptly named host, i want to say right at the outset, we have five hundred stars campaign in case podcast listeners might not make it to tony’s take two trying to get one hundred ratings, one hundred five star ratings, hopefully on itunes. So is the five hundred stars campaign, and i would be grateful if you’d go to itunes and raped the show. Do one to five, but we’re hoping for five, and we have winners from last week’s podcast, winner of a three hundred forty nine dollars one year subscription to the atlas of giving courtesy of last week’s guest rob mitchell. The one podcast winner is rich fuss, and we have a podcast winner remaining there’s still one spot remaining from last week’s podcast. But you have to listen. Podcast listeners, all ninety, three hundred of you, teo see how to win as rich frosted and we have winners from this week’s survey. Too old. What we get is the email addresses if your email starts with arts or if it’s martha gentlemen and you filled out the survey then if you have that email address and the survey just in case somebody has arts but you didn’t do the survey, then you wouldn’t have won. But if you did the survey and you have arts or martha john allen as the beginning of your email address, then you also have one, three hundred and forty nine eight three hundred forty nine dollars subscription teo atlas of giving that’s a one year subscription. Oh, i very much hope that you were with me last week. I’d be devastated to hear that you had missed e-giving looking back in the head, it was with rob mitchell, the ceo of atlas, of giving, and he told us how giving by sector source and state did in two thousand twelve and how will do in two thousand thirteen we talked about sectors that increased and which one increased most and all for you to compare how you did, in contrast with the larger picture, and he also shared his forecast for twenty thirteen this week. Iana jane hoexter is with me for the hour. She’s, the author of grantwriting, revealed twenty five experts share their art, science and secrets. We’ll talk about researching relationship building, writing and why you can’t polish a turd midway through the show on tony’s take two we’ll talk a little more about the five hundred stars campaign. I would be grateful for your ratings and i have a new block post out on another site on dhe mentioned that a little bit also, but now i’m very pleased to welcome dahna jane hoexter to the studio. She’s, the author of grantwriting, revealed twenty five experts share their art, science and secrets. She gives the book as a gift to the non-profit community at grantwriting revealed dot com as president of grants champion. Her practice is focused on individual and small group grant etching and training for organizations including retreats and team building for development teams, conference keynotes and grant training for state and national membership organizations. She served on the national board of grant professionals association. Yana is a medium and channels with the spirit world, but she is not our first medium guest we have had we had a medium on once before i’m very pleased to welcome our second medium and the author of grantwriting revealed dahna jane hoexter welcome to the studio thank you nice to meet you. Pleasure to have you on dahna. Um, what was your methodology? How did you find the right twenty five grants? Experts to the interview? Well, it wasn’t entirely scientific process. What i did was i started out with a few people who i had a lot of respect for and had earned raised a lot of money in over the years, and i reached out to some foundations and asked who they thought with their best grantees that wrote the best grand proposals, and i got some really fantastic recommendations. And then i asked heads of national organizations who they would recommend and just ask colleagues in the field, and i was looking for certain things on i wanted to have a really broad spectrum of people that i would interview so for geographic distribution, gender distribution, people that worked on government proposals and foundation proposals and across the field and i really did accomplish that and that people would have a very high success rate and that they would have raised a significant amount of money. But obviously, people who had worked on foundations would raise less money than people who work in government. Grants and i believe this cadre of twenty five raised one point has raised one point seven billion dollars in their careers. Yes. And it’s more since about since the book came out standing and hundreds of years of experience. I’m sure you have four hundred years of experience in twenty four thousand proposals that they have excellent snusz you make the gift. Sorry. You make the book a gift. Why do you do that? On dh what’s what’s your your idea of a gift in this respect, i did that because i realized that i had that i had wanted to write. The book is a way of sharing everything that i had learned in my career. A za grantwriting and that the people who i interviewed gave me that time and were incredibly generous with what they shared. And when it came to publishing the book what i wanted to do, wass to gift it to the non-profit community, not as a freebie is a giveaway. But really, teo stimulate the conversation about what it is to live. Life is a gift that life itself is a gift it’s given to us. We have gif ts within us. That we can share with each other and when we generate communities that are based on generosity and trust, people feel more free to shove a gift, and i feel very deeply about this. And so i decided to put my book wet my mouth, this feel very deeply because you could have made some money doing that. Yeah, i could and s o it is available, people can buy it if you want to buy hardcopy it’s available amazon, but otherwise i truly welcome people to come to my website. You can ask for a copy of the book, and i’m asking people to ask because i want to know that it’s going to someone who would want to use it and we’ll use it on the neat thing is i get to see how people are going to us because you ask, how will you use this? How will you pay it forward? And so it’s a really neat every day i get these emails from people telling me, you know, raising money for an orphanage in guatemala and and and then what i’m asking for people to do is to reciprocate to me in a way that would feel great, and someone sent me some dried cherries from michigan. I’ve had other people send me off beautiful photographs and or more realistically, to pay it forward in their community, integrate the work and pay it forward, or do something directly if some people have been helping at animal shelters or someone person threw a birthday party for an eighty second and each two year old neighbor and invited all of her friends, and she said that that was what she decided to do in response. So so i and then i went asking people to come back to my website and share how they’ve paid it forward, and the reason i’m doing that is because when we give a gift in a family or in a religious community, we can see that we give a presence and we can see that it’s used and appreciated, but when i do it through the internet, i don’t have any of that. I’m just sending it out there, and so so it really creates a sense of community that people can come back and see what other people have done, and this is all that grantwriting revealed dot com, right? That’s where listeners could go for a copy of the book now someone like me would say that you’re holding in your hands iraq, it’s usually iraq that’s on the on the desk here in the studio and i use it to weigh down my headset cable. But we’ve rigged a different way, but this is not a mere rock. This is your holding a crystal. What now? This crystal has always been here for every show that i’ve done this’s show number one hundred twenty six on every every guest has always seen that crystal, but why are you holding it? Well, it’s actually rose court and rose quartz is about love, but most clearly it’s about generating self love and loving yourself in a way that you can give to others. S oh it’s, a it’s all about love, so i just saw it sitting there and i was like, oh, i think that’ll pull that i would feel great to have it sitting here, so of course, and i’ve of course, shunned it one hundred twenty six times, so no love to give here from me that you’re you’re picking up the void that i’ve created, we have just a couple minutes before break and then we’ll have plenty of time to talk about the book. Um, what did we just get into a little? Just a little bit about research finding it’s critical to find the right institution to approach. Yep. And what was it interesting for me when i was working on the book was the people that i interviewed had all had significant experience and so have i. And so when i was interviewing them, what i was really listening for was things that were interesting to me, and i figured if it was interesting to me and i learned something that it was going in the book because i had known all of you, i’ve known the basics for a long time and s o that’s really what’s in the book, but a z in the process of writing it, i was really thinking about what is it that they’re doing that’s different than other people, why they success so successful? Why are they so resilient and able to stay and looking at those essential elements? And originally someone had asked if i could, you know, five top things that top brent writers do and and i looked at it and like, no, they don’t do five top things that no one else does it’s, that they have that they really have this holistic approach, where they do all of the basic things that need to be done, and they don’t skip things that don’t work. And so one of those elements, his research and what you said, they don’t skip things that don’t work. Now, they don’t skip things that they don’t like to dio. Don’t worry, doug, so they know you’re skipping that don’t work, but, you know, we have to take a break. I think that we’ll talk more about the research topic. This is your lovelace host, tony martignetti. Now that i’ve learned that, i’m loveless, i’d only discovered this just moments ago, and when we come back, lots of time talking about yonas book grantwriting revealed, stay with us, talking alternative radio, twenty four hours a day. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership, customer service sales, or maybe better writing, are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stopped by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications. That’s the answer. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome back there is love in the studio and i’m always sending, of course, live listener love do that every week. So there is love coming from me. Just i’m not holding the courts. Uh, live. Listen, love going out to rest in virginia and harrisonburg, virginia welcome, virginia, new bern, north carolina. I’m going to be there shortly next week. North carolina will be eaten. Rabbit eaten rabbit, rap rapids. I thought you were rabbits. You’re not rabbits. Not have all been bitten. No. Eaton rapids, michigan. Helena montana and newport, oregon welcome, beijing, china, wuhan, china, ni hao live listener love to those and many more coming let’s talk a little more iana about research finding the right match. Okay, so what i realised with the people that i spoke to is that they were very careful about who they actually went to. And so instead of sending things out willy nilly orthe sending things out if they didn’t think they had a good shot place really put time and figuring out, is it worth going to do this? And so they think very carefully about what the thunder is looking for and whether if there is a request for proposals and r p if there was a good fit and one of the things that one of the people i interviewed a head is a really great analogy of having a glove. And he said, if you think of the glove as thie arika p is a glove with, you know, four fingers and a thumb, if you think about the project that we’ve got our organization, does it fit in four fingers, or does it just fit in one thumb on one finger? And to think, if it’s a really good fit, and if it’s just one finger and one thumb, then let’s not bother with it? And i really loved the index finger and one thumb and the pinky way didn’t go that detail, but i actually really like that analogy because i realized afterwards that, you know, people often think of our peace and grants is a mitten like you could shove anything in the interesting. So yeah, so actually thinking of it as a glove, these specific pieces and what’s a fit and what’s not. And so i think, that’s one of the things that to find these people over others was the amount of thought that goes into researching whether a funder is a good fit, whether in honor of p is a good fit and then deciding whether to put time into it or not. I had a pre show a survey question, actually, two questions related to this have you ever been pressured to write a grant proposal you knew wasn’t a good fit with the thunder on about fifty percent said yes, a little more fifty, fifty four percent said yes and the others said no and then related question have you ever been pressured to write a grant proposal? You knew i wasn’t a good fit with your charities mission and about the same pretty close to fifty fifty. What about that? When you get institutional pressure from a supervisor could be a boardmember to write something teo to apply for something that you just know in your heart is not the right match is actually one of the things i talked about the interviews with someone because it’s very common thing you can hear, you know, fifty per cent. So what do you do in those circumstances? We’ll see, i said, all the fifty percent i thought. It was good. I get from grantwriting get’s gross. Yeah. That’s fast the time. Yeah, well, they know they didn’t say half the time, but half the people surveyed had said, all right, i thought it was a good time, but now it’s actually very that’s. Pretty bad. Yeah, i think it’s that, you know, that you’re doing something that you don’t really believe in you. So what feels like a waste of time? Because often, you know, those things aren’t going to get funded. Andi, but one of the people i interviewed he had worked for a large school district, frank, mentally, he worked for a large school district, and in the beginning they kept saying to him, apply for this supply for this apply for this, and he had a hard time saying, you know, actually, we’d be better off doing the strategically if we actually applied for less, but, you know, really thought about what we were doing he wasn’t getting anywhere until that they successfully won two grants that they had written in their department without really working with the school’s, very much it’ll, but at the behest of the administration and the’s with these big grants and he said they ended up having to change them a million times over the years. They were just a mess. The people who were implementing them were not involved in the development, and he said it was because of that, that that then he was able to say, look, when you pressure us to do these things, we can’t actually occasionally win them, and then it creates more of a mess afterwards. So if you just let us work closely with people and really deciding what the best thing is to do, and when they did that, their fund-raising went up, they actually weighs more money when they were being strategic and actually applying for fewer grants and on dh he actually in his korea, i think he was there for over twenty five years. They raised half a billion dollars while he was there. He was an extremely good fundraiser had a team of people. So so what i suggest in the book is if you’re getting that kind of pressure is to ask other grantwriting on fund-raising what are the grants you wish you had never gotten? Because you were kind of pressured into doing it? And take some of those stories and then share them with your board or with with your edie and say, look, you know, i think it’s a consequence of running after money. That really isn’t a good fit. It’s. Not good for the thunder. It ruins your reputation, it’s. Not good for the organization, because you end up working on things that aren’t your highest priority. So you really have to focus on what you’re here for, other than just getting money. Once you’ve identified well, let me ask, is there anything else you want to say about the research process before we moved to starting to build relationships with? No, no, i’m happy to meet you. She’s clutching this crystal is just it’s just terror for the woman’s terrified e i want to get your laugh because i have such a hearty laugh. I love your love that comes with dirty jokes. No way to know for the second half, and we’ll be doing some research because i don’t know any off the top of my head. Um all right, so let’s, start teo, build some relationships where we think there might be an appropriate fit. You spend a good amount of time, i think talking about different roles at the at the funders. So let’s, talk about thea, the gatekeeper. What are we going toe? How do we, uh i work with and maybe around? I don’t know. We’ll see what you say. The gatekeeper at a at a funder. Okay, well, i think i mean, this is more often with foundations rather than government. Because if it’s a government, usually you khun get directly to a programme officer and speak directly with them in most instances. Um, but with foundations it’s hard to just call up and speak to someone on the board or speak to a programme. Officer there’s, usually a gate keeper who you speak to. And just some of the couple of the people that i interviewed were just, like, exquisitely charming, like they charmed the socks off me and like the first five minutes of the interview. So you could just tell that they were just charming anywhere and on dh. They were just great and telling me what they did because this is not my area of expertise. But one of the things that they said is that they would specifically try to generate a relationship with the person that ends the phone and to ask if they could send them in the right direction. Say what they were looking for and on dh then when they actually got an in person interview at the foundation, they would make sure that they would take a book or some small things to do with the with their organization or work. And when they had finished speaking to the programme officer with then say, you know i just actually like to acknowledge and thanks, suzie, for me, she was so helpful to me and setting up this this appointment, and so then they would give that, and then you have a relationship with the person who, you know, may very genuinely feel this protectiveness for the program officer, they can’t let everybody speak to the program office, and they’ve never get any work done. So where it may for us when we cool, it may seem rude or, you know, off putting, you have to really flip it around and remember that it’s actually very a loving thing to do for the program officers that they’re protecting them from the barrage of phone calls. So i think just sort of flipping it around really helps, and at what stage are we making this call to the foundation when you’ve done your research and decided that they were a good fit so well before starting to type? Yes, definitely before starting to type because there’s no point typing if your typing something that’s not actually going to resonate with the people who are reading it. So you want to actually find some some way of developing that? Relationship at least you have an idea of what people are looking for. And this actually if with someone asked me if i had to think of one thing that the top grantwriting that i interviewed did what it boiled down to toe, you do have one. Okay? One maybe. Yeah, but it’s not exclusive s o it’s. Not like the one thing if you do, but what i what i really saw in everybody they interviewed was an exquisite sensitivity to the relationship. So if it was a foundation grant writer, they were, you know, just wonderful a developing relationships with foundations and, you know, the gatekeepers on dh. If it was a government grant writer, it might not be so much like interpersonal relationship, but they were exquisitely attuned to how the r f p was written. Who wrote it? Who is going to be a river reviewing it? How to write so the reviewer would would really get it. So it was just this really strong sensitivity to the fact that it is not a piece of writing that you just send out willy nilly. It’s a piece of writing that you’re communicating from your organization from you, directly to another human being who’s who’s reading yes, and you know that you’ve gotten to know that human being on dh now, even if they if they perhaps won’t take a meeting, though you would you would try you develop a relationship by phone? Yes, and you can, you know, hopefully you can call up you khun you can ask for an interview could asked for some time chatting on the phone for a few minutes, and even if the answer to that is no it’s informational, too, you know that there are some foundations that are more open and there’s some for the foundations that are more private and just even in those interactions you get which one that you’re working with, and so it might give you an idea of the type of writing that would work for an organisation that chooses to be more private, and and it also gives you a signal of whether you can develop some kind of relationship with an organization like that. Sometimes you can’t and that’s just a signal to back and maybe put more focus and attention with an organization or foundation, whether how more open and so now you’re in the office of the project, officer, we’ll talk a little a few minutes about the government program officer because you spend all the time we’re talking about them specifically, but now you’re in a project officer let’s say, the foundation you’re in their conference room or their the office? What types of things are you trying to elicit? Well, i think it’s not a matter of eliciting, actually, i think it’s more a matter of listening and s o really listening for what that price is? Why? This is why i’m not a grand writer at all because, you know, obviously terrible, i’d have the whole wrong attitude, that’s the whole thing? No, no, but i’m learning. I’m learning. Okay, uh, a lot of listening. Okay, so you want to find out what their priorities you want to understand? A little bit about how the foundation works. So it could be a program officer who has some degree of power to approve or deny something, but usually that’s a boardmember so often what program officers are looking for our winners that they can take to their board. You know, their job is to find good projects. Good. Organizations good people and bring them to the board saying i think this would be a winner, so you want to be very conscious of what it is that they’re looking for so that they can bring good proposals too. Teo to the board, the other thing to bear in mind is that they can often can’t green light things they can read like things, so they may say that this isn’t a good fit. I don’t think so, but they often do not have the power to say absolutely we’re going to fund this, they can say, i think our board would like it, and then your next question is always going to be how can i empower you to teo persuade for us in the board room? Because they’re your ad. They are your advocate in the boardroom, right? Let’s, let’s talk about about that perfect segway to the trustees to and so so the people who do make the decisions of the trustees in the vast majority of cases and but you may not have a relationship with the trustee of the small foundation you might, but over the larger one where there are program offices, you you do not. So what you really want to focus on there is finding out what our priorities for the people who are making the decisions and the program officers may be able to tell you that on dh then for the program offices is really looking at, you know, what is it that i can give you that makes your job easier when you’re speaking with the board friend? They may say, you know, give me a power point with three pages on it or give me a, you know, one sentence that i can use or just you may think it’s pages and pages and often time it’s the simplest things that they need onda or sometimes it’s a story, give me a story about someone you’ve worked with. I can pass that along so so that you can so that the board members can really make a decision based on what matters to them. In some instances, if it’s a smaller foundation, you may have a relationship directly with the boardmember there may not be any program officers, in which case it’s same set of questions. What matters to you, what you care about, you know you. Have to really remember that they give the money away, that they don’t have to give it’s just giving it away because they can what is it that they care about really deeply enough to be involved in? We’re giving the money away and also exposing themselves as a person of wealth and, you know, to being constantly asked, they must really care deeply about something and how what is it that they care about that you also care deeply about? And where is that common point so that you can really work together on creating something that wouldn’t exist? Otherwise, you know, if there was just the foundation having tons of money, but not the not the relationships, they can’t accomplish anything if it’s a non-profit with relationships and ideas and energy and vision, but no resource is financial resources they can accomplish, but you put all the resource is together, and it creates something in the world that would not exist on, you know, without without that coming together. And so i often think that grant writers have this beautiful role of facilitating search, another form of mediumship it’s facilitating between different groups to present something that wouldn’t exist otherwise. Dahna jane hoexter is author of grantwriting revealed twenty five. Experts share their art, science and secrets. And when we come back, it’ll be tony’s. Take two, and then more time with yana and lots more live listener. Love will stay with us because you didn’t think that shooting. Good ending. You’re listening to the talking alternative network e-giving. E-giving cubine hi, i’m donna and i’m done were certified mediators, and i am a family and couples licensed therapists and author of please don’t buy me ice cream are show new beginnings is about helping you and your family recover financially and emotionally and start the beginning of your life will answer your questions on divorce, family court, co parenting, personal development, new relationships, blending families and more dahna and i will bring you to a place of empowerment and belief that even though marriages may end, families are forever join us every monday, starting september tenth at ten a m on talking alternative dot com are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications? Then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s two one two seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way look forward to serving you! You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Yeah. I’m christine cronin, president of n y charities dot orc. You’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back, big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent time for tony’s take two at pretty much thirty two minutes into the hour it’s the five hundred stars campaign i’m i’m looking for one hundred ratings on itunes so that we can reflect the fact that there’s over nine thousand listeners on their only about twenty ratings on itunes, so i’d like to fix that and the reason this’s not just ego there’s there’s a rationale for wanting more ratings on itunes, and that is because it will raise the prominence of this show among itunes and thereby share the show and its experts with mohr charities in the charity community. So it’s really an act for dahna if i can draw from the crystal and i’m gonna hold the crystal drawing, i’m holding the crystal now first time one hundred twenty six so you know, i’m desperate, i’m seeking love from the crystal you’re sending out love to the charity community throughout the world by raising the prominence of the show, and the way to do that is to get us to one hundred one through five star ratings and it’s five hundred stars campaign because i hope you’ll give us five stars, but you don’t have to, but that’s what i’m hoping and that’s the five hundred stars campaigns, i thank you very much for doing that. You start at non-profit radio dot net and then click view in itunes or just go to itunes and search for the show name and read it there. I also want you to know that i have a new blood post on non-profit fund-raising well, the name of the block is non-profit fund-raising my post is what is planned e-giving and you’ll find that blogged at management help dot or ge, and i’ll have a new post there every every month, so you can either go to management, help dot or gq, or just google non-profit fund-raising and you’ll see that blogged the non-profit fund-raising blawg come up as pretty sure that’s the very first result and that is tony’s take two for friday, january twenty fifth, the fourth show of the year. And yana i want tio thank you for letting me borrow the thie crystal for the stone the now the courts, the courts that’s what? I keep going in crystal but that that’s how little i know, but it is crystal court’s, so heroes e could be what’s what’s what’s the word for a rock geologist. Write just i was thinking of entomologist but that’s insects that’s entomologist is insects. Entomologist is words, but but they were both wrong geologist live listener love, newport, oregon. Truman’s, burghdoff york, new york, new york are you still on? After this diatribe about entomology and geology, you’re probably no longer with us. But if you are live listener love to newport, oregon, newport, oregon. That’s, terrific truman’s, burghdoff york, new york, new york and raymond main welcome, seoul, korea, on yo haserot live listener loved all our live listeners. You make a point of spending the time talking about government program officers and how they could be different than project officers at a foundation so let’s for people who are seeking government grants, why is the government program officer a little different? Well, we pay their salary, so it makes it a little different. So government program officers really considered that their job is teo be a civil servant who provides information, and so they are quite different from foundations in that you should expect that of program officer is happy to pick up the phone, happy to respond to your e mails and answer any questions that you have it does it’s not always the case in new york state. I’m not sure if this is this case in other states, but in new york state they have really could put gag rules around the state employees so now it’s hard for them to answer questions, even if they would like to, but mostly definitely the federal level on dh. There may be blackout periods where they’re not allowed to talk to you, but you can you can go and set up a meeting, you could go off and go meet with program officers in washington, d c or in your state capital and it’s a great opportunity to listen what’s really important for them, they’re incredibly experienced people. Sometimes you’ve been in the business for decades have seen what works, what doesn’t work, you can really hear what they’re looking for and on dh, they’re happy to talk to you, and if you’re applying for a federal grant and you don’t take advantage of that it’s just this whole gap because it’s just the whole amount of information that’s available to you that just that is all you have to do is call and it’s not a difficult thing and so happy to tell you what their priorities are and what that might be. Don’t go asking questions that aeryn, there are p that’s just really annoying. But read the rp thoroughly and then, if there are nuances, are questions you might have beyond that that’s time when you’d want to speak to the program officer and then i found them to be anchor, incredibly helpful and quite a bit more accessible, easily accessible what’s around the blackout periods that you mentioned, where are a program officer might not be allowed to talk to you. Okay, well, how’d it’s an example of that where they will talk to you for most of the year? But once there general our p, which is called a supernova, comes out they supernova supernova so supernova of george in jail on tony martignetti non-profit ditigal and trying to get you in there, you and your courts, crystal what’s a supernova supernova is a super. And then the nufer stands for a notice of funding. I don’t know what the a would be maybe announcement, something like that. And but anyway, it’s, when they put out all their are of peas at once, and they call it the supernova. And once the supernova has come out, then their staff members, and not allowed to speak to teo organizations. And i think it has roots in the fact that there was some shenanigans going on years ago with relationships that were not totally above board. So they had this blackout period. But up until then you can and and and that it’s true with some other agencies, they’ll occasionally i have noticed that some program officers go on vacation during the time of the grant development period which is not really helpful. That’s our own personal black out that’s great, right that’s. A good guess. That’s. Great. We’re blacking out. Okay, so now you have a sense of you have very good sense. Hopefully of what it is that’s going to motivate the decision maker and let’s talk so let’s, talk a little about the the design of your programme or your project on dh, please. You have something called the dominatrix gene in the book. So let’s let’s, work that in okay. Great. So yes, the idea is, if you’ve done research, you know what someone’s looking for you have reached out to them and have an idea of what personally really matters to him so that you are connecting and knowing that it’s worthwhile for you to spend hours and hours and hours in writing a grant proposal? Eso you’ve done all the prep work that, you know, it’s worth while and then you want to be thinking with working with your team and your agency about planning a project that you really know is going to resonate with the thunder and you made this is a backwards and forwards process, you know, you kind of start, you may go back to them and really develop it with input from them, so, you know, so so you’re still in communication with them? Absolutely, i’m if you have questions, certainly when during the process of things come up, you know, reach back out and and don’t do it in a void. So the dominatrix jean i looked it, actually that their two personalities when i i was on a plane coming back from california when i’d done all the interviews and so i decided that i was going to read all of thie interviews to collectively, and i have to like our three. I was like, wow, it’s almost like i interviewed one person. They were so similar in a lot of that traits, and then i realized, like, own actually no it’s two people, because the people who work on foundation grants tend to have extremely good interpersonal skills that they use in developing relationships with funders. But the government grant developers also had excellent into personal skills. But maurin managing a team on dh on dh using that a za way of keeping a project on track because it really requires, like military grade precision to do these things in a short time window. So one of the people i interviewed she’s she’s from the fifties early sixties and just writes hud proposals, and she had she said, well, you know, it’s, really this balance of, you know, of love and power, it’s i’m a dominatrix at heart, so it’s, you know, having a timeline and then holding people to the timeline and she said, you know, it’s one part charm, one part threat, you know? And so, andi, i saw this is actually a common thing with some of the people that i interviewed and i’ve just handed myself cause i work on large grants to of just, you know, having a look att how you actually accomplished this of, you know, pushing people actually, that you have to to get these things done sometimes, but also having people still wanting to work with you and swan ting to get this done, and people are tired and, you know, keeping flagging spirits going heimans so finding this balance between holding people accountable and on dh, but also keeping keeping their spirits up, and and there are several ways of doing that one of the people a couple of people in the book mentioned, you know, the there’s, the threat of public exposure, that khun go with it, you know, if we really must have stopped, this could be in the paper and that that’s one piece, but for me, personally, i i really focus actually on calling on people’s hyre good it’s like, do you remember that this is a five million dollar grant that we’re going to bring to a school district so that kids who don’t have access to x, y and z will for the next five years like this is really going to make a difference. And you’re doing that right now with, you know, working for this extra half an hour right now, and and i also find that helps in planning meetings. You know, when people start getting territorial and, you know, i don’t want to do this, right. Barreira is, i bring people back to. Do you remember why we’re here, like we’re here to create something that is really going to make a difference? And could you actually just drop that piece? And are you willing to drop that so we can accomplish something much larger and then thin exist on? I find that that works very well with people rounding people to the purpose. Yeah, exactly, reminding them why we’re here and what we’re up to. Not surprisingly, because i do hear this a lot, even my experience in grantwriting that the importance of storytelling as we start as we move now toe writing what’s going to be submitted storytelling brings things alive, obviously right? Yeah, absolutely. And i actually am of natural storyteller, and i think a lot of great writers are natural storytellers, and i think as a human species, we are storytellers, you know, that’s what we do, we communicate through stories and and so grantwriting is no different, you know, people think of the grantwriting process is all about the writing when people ignore the research, the relationship, building in the planning and and so they but they also just think of it is kind of factual writing, you know what? We’re going to write this down, and they forget about this story element and and so i think it’s it’s, it’s critical to think about why, what story you’re telling and what of the roles of the thunder play in that story and just to engage the reader right from the beginning? And one of the people i interviewed actually was a theater director, and he had talked about the fact that when he is thinking about a proposal, he thinks of it a cz like, you know, it’s the same as he does this to play, you know, what is the story here? What will keep people coming back for the second act on where’s? The complication and someone else i interviewed. She said she thinks if she writes he’s, very boring had proposals. I mean, housing and urban development, housing and urban development. Yes. And their proposals are not known for, you know, creativity and on dh, she said, i think of the most romance novels dahna out amazing. So she said, well, i think that was as romance novels and, you know, you have to flirt with them a little bit. You have to have them have give them a sense of who that they would keep reading. And not so far is fifty shades of grey, no for his romance novel, but not bringing in the dominatrix stream down and xero yes, actually. So you want to but it’s just that he’s that point of of keeping people interested in intrigue, and not especially with government proposals. Just don’t keep it all bland and boring. You can give examples of stories of the people that you serve on also. But the proposal itself, you can kind of think about that. So just a minute before a break. So just in that little time, how do we deal with on help to hope to avoid writing bike, buy committee? Gosh, just don’t do it. But how do you avoid it when everybody’s everybody wants to participate? They want they want to write their own part and they want to review the whole thing. Okay, so basically you just have to be really clear that you know what you’re doing, that you have the capacity to write very well into raise lots of money and you will take their input. But you have to be really clear about who the scribes and that’s you and that you that you have to have one primary voice. You can’t have more than one voice in in a writing document. It’s. Just too much work for the reviewer. So be very clear. I good at what i do. Make clear and concise writer i will incorporate what really matters to you. And but this’s give people plan to ten chinese to give. You feedback, but not, but not to write it and put their voice in, right? So you are, in fact, right, so listening, their input, but using, as you said, just the one voice, exactly. Excellent. We’re gonna take this break, and when we return more time with with yana talking about grantwriting revealed. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping hunters. People be better business people. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Metoo welcome back. We’re having great fun talking about grantwriting on dme or live listener love, philadelphia, p a north, richland hills, texas, and la jolla, california. Welcome live listener love to you na ha, japan, tokyo, japan, konnichiwa and algeria. I’m sorry. We don’t know what city algeria the software is only showing the country soldier do the best i could. Um, so we are yes, we’re trying to avoid writing by by committee and a single voice. Any any other advice? Just that you’re the expert leave me alone? Yeah, yeah, i think what can be really helpful is giving people an outline. One of the people i interviewed said this is it’s easier to get people to give you input on outline and content rather than on the final narrative when that might be wordsmithing. So people project your people who are, you know, work doctors working in a hospital, for example, might be better if you give them so that the outline the main ideas and they’re like on and on and that doesn’t work. You need to add this, but they’re not going to be giving you you no advice on different different wording and that really that’s more helpful to people because, ah, you want t get as much input as you can from your team. Definitely. And also they can draft pieces on sections for you. You just need to be really clear that you know that i have the final say in how it’s crafted as faras the language goes on dh it’s, not from the fact that i need to, you know, dominate here. I need it’s known ego thing. It’s really? That if you want us to win, this is the best way of doing it. And let me do my job so that we can win. So you do have a section of the book devoted to cem cem secrets. And one of those is that you can’t polish a turd. Yes. So how does that relate to grantwriting? Actually, that comes in on element about truth telling. The way the book is laid out, actually, is that there are twenty four elements things that i consider to be really essential elements for grantwriting and that people can go through the book, read about those elements, and then there’s a quiz. Actually, that i developed that’s also on my website. That people can take it, and then they can see which elements they might be weak on, in which my elements they might be strong on. And the argument that i that i make is that i think the top grantwriting sits like a link in a chain, so they have all four of those are all twenty four of those links that a strong so that the whole process is strong on that can allow for artistry to emerge for the craft to emerge, but when you’ve, you know, skipped a step by, you know, not building a strong relationship, we’re not even reaching out or skipping the research, something like that that then that you don’t have that solid foundation, so one of the elements is about being impeccable with the truth and it’s something that everybody who deals with fund-raising comes up with your, especially with grantwriting because you’re dealing with a deadline and you’re dealing with money, so you’ve got time and money that the two biggest pressures of our society and their slapped right in your face with a six week deadline and a multi million dollar grant to prepare. So what often happened? And often, but reasonably often people ask you to cut a corner it’s like, well, we don’t have time to do that. We can’t do that and you know that ethically it crosses a boundary for you on dh, then you’re stuck with what do i do with this? And what we find is is that often those ethical corners are asked because people don’t know that it’s actually not a reasonable thing to do, so you can just simply explain, actually, that would be in violation of the end of this ethical code, or that on dh, then that’s the other piece i’ve just flat out saying, i refuse to do that, and then they and then that but there’s this grey area in this boundary of taking something and showing its best aspect ce you know that that is totally fine. So taking some things and really highlighting its strength said that is a but that’s our craft that’s what we do, the polishing, the turd peace comes with really knowing of looking at that situation. Do you have something really worthwhile and fragment? Lee, one of the people i interviewed, he said that when he first started a job at a community college years and years ago, his boss came on his first day, a late to a meeting, and he said, i’m so sorry i was late, i was at a meeting with the council of dean’s, and we spent three hours trying to polish a turd, and then we realized that we couldn’t i have nothing left when you do that there is indeed so so there’s this place off, you know, taking a used car and buffing it up and making it look good and pointing out the low mileage that’s totally great, but is there really anything worthwhile there? And for people that is always it’s an ethical decision that you have to make for yourself? And you’re the one that has to sleep at night and for myself the way i often do that, please, i think about last year and how hard i work to pay my taxes is a government grand like this’s my money, actually, that we’re spending here. Do i want my money going to this? If it’s a foundation proposal, i think if this was my parents and i was asking my parents to invest their retirement money in this wood, i feel comfortable about that and so the for me, that was kind of my two questions of where i go with it am i really just, you know, putting the best spin on something? Or am i just just taking something that’s not too shouldn’t be funded, you know, let’s ah, have what i like to share ah, love moment, tell me what it is that you love about grantwriting in this whole process, what i love about it, what i love about it is it brings things into existence, it wouldn’t exist otherwise, and and it really gets to the cooler what i love, what i work with people is getting to the core of what they love and why they do their work, and i often work with people who’ve been in the field for decades and have helped them fund-raising that they have dreamed about literally for twenty or thirty years and then bringing the funding for them so they can see it happen. So it’s very rewarding for me. Enjoy that. Do you practice buddhism? No, no, i thought you may. I see a lot of elements of what you’re the way. You talk and the way you relate, but thank you very much for being a guest welcome pleasure. You’re not holding the crystal, the court’s crystal as tightly as you were an hour ago. That’s very good that’s a very good sign. It’s been a pleasure having you as a guest. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. You’re welcome dahna jane hoexter, the author of grantwriting, revealed twenty five experts share their art, science and secrets, and you’ll you can download the book as a za gift is, yon explained at grantwriting revealed dot com and you confined her consulting at grants champion dot com next week. I’ll have for you an interview from blackbaud sze bb con conference last october, where i was getting a bunch of interviews from the speakers there and also scott koegler, our tech contributor and the editor of non-profit technology news will be back with trends in tech specific needs, social media and customization. I’d be grateful for your for your one two five star rating on itunes. Lots of lots of live listeners today more than usual, if you could open a window to itunes after you close the window or listening here. I’d be very, very grateful. Thank you. More live listener love going to atlanta, georgia, clifton park, new york. Nanjing, china shenzhen, china knee. How? Istanbul, turkey. And shuja shuhei, china live listener love to all of you. We’re all over the social web facebook, youtube, twitter linked in four, square ah, pick out one linked in have you joined the linked in group? There are people from all over the country there’s, someone from peoria, illinois, there’s someone from san francisco and there are about eighty other people in the lincoln group. Have you joined? Our creative producer was claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is our line producer shows social media is by regina walton of organic social media and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. I very much hope you’ll be with me next friday one to two p m eastern. Talking alternative broadcasting on talking alternative dot com hyre i don’t think that’s a good ending. You’re listening to the talking alternate network duitz waiting to get in. 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Call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way look forward to serving you! You’re listening to talking alternative network at www dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Oh, this is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays, one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting are you fed up with talking points, rhetoric everywhere you turn left or right? Spin ideology no reality, in fact, its ideology over in tow. No more it’s time for action. 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