423: Courageous Communication – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2This week:

Courageous Communication
Maryanne Dersch says your nonprofit may be codependent and it’s stifling your communications. Are you afraid to stand out? Do you prefer middle-of-the road content to driving on the sidewalk? She may be right. She’s the author of the book, “Courageous Communication.”

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

399: LinkedIn Marketing – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Marc Halpert, author of “You, Us, Them: LinkedIn Marketing Concepts for Nonprofit Professionals Who Really Want to Make a Difference.” 

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com

206: Your Personal Brand – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guest this week:

Dorie Clark, author of “Reinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future.”

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

170: Brandraise To Fundraise & Safeguard Your Donor Data – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Sarah Durham, principal & founder of Big Duck and author of “Brandraising.”

Scott Koegler, editor of Nonprofit Technology News.

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent i’m your aptly named host feels so good to be back in the studio after our thanksgiving break. I hope you loved your thanksgiving and i hope you were with me two weeks ago. I’d be forced to endure ketoacidosis if i came to learn that you had missed empower your volunteers. Karen brewster is executive director of wreaths across america. They have grown their volunteer support enormously, and she explained how that was recorded at bebe khan twenty thirteen this past october and what’s their style. Maria simple returned she’s, the prospect finder and our prospect research contributor. We talked about the disk assessment tool to figure out whether your potential donors are dominant, influencing steady or cautious. Plus she had her sixty seconds style stop this week brandraise to fundraise. Sarah durham is principal and founder of big duck communications consultants for non-profits people need to know you before you can ask them for money. What is brandraise ing and how does it pave the road to fund-raising that was recorded at fund-raising day in june and safeguard your donordigital now. That you have donors, how do you best preserve and protect their information? Scott koegler is our tech contributor and the editor of non-profit technology news between the guests tony’s take to create a culture of philanthropy throughout your non-profit it’s a panel discussion that i hosted were supported by rally bound peer-to-peer fund-raising for runs, walks and rides, and by t b r c cost recovery. Getting you money back from phone bill errors and asians here is brandraise to fundraise welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand thirteen, we’re in midtown manhattan in times square at the marriott marquis hotel, and my guest now is sarah durham. She is principal and founder of big duck, and her seminar topic is brandraise to fundraise, build your house before you throw a party. Sorry, europe. Welcome. Hey, thanks, tony. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Tell me about the big duck agency. So i started big deck in nineteen ninety four and so were nineteen years old. We work exclusively with non-profits to help them communicate more effectively. I love the conciseness. Thank you. Thank you. What is brandraise ing brandraise thing is a model. We’ve developed over many, many years of working with non-profits to help wth, um, rebrand largely in order to be more effective at communicating with donors, clients and other key constituents, and it’s, a model that integrates, um, best practices from the for-profit world with some non-profit reality’s like, where should the board be involved in branding, or how does your vision mission of values integrate into the work? So we do recognize that there are lessons to be learned from the corporate side there definitely are, although i would say that many a non-profit i don’t think you can be too black and white about that. I think there are lots of great lessons to learn from the for-profit world, but what works in the for-profit world does not always work in the nonprofit world, and so, you know, that’s the challenge for sure, yeah, all right, how do we get started with identifying our brand and starting this process? Well, a lot of organizations usually back into thinking about their brand because there’s another challenge that has forced them to deal with it. So for instance, they want over how their website and their thinking before we overhaul. That web site we should really sort out, you know, the problems. We have their name or the challenge with our logo, and so they kind of end up, you know, sort of through the side door getting into branding. But we’re big advocates for rethinking your brand any time you go through a significant change after strategic planning. So strategic planning should come first. But then, if your strategic plan mandates a shift in communications, that’s a really good time to revisit the brands are now brand is much deeper than just logo and name and tagline, right? Absolutely. Help us understand how how what death is. Yeah. It’s. A great question. And i would argue that your brand begins with a clear strategy that everybody in the organization is aligned with what’s. The big idea you want to communicate? We call that positioning there’s a strategic plan it’s for grows right out of your strategic plan. And then also, what is the personality of the organization? What? How does it, what tone and style does it want to use to communicate? For instance, an organization like pita has a very different communications personality than the cia. Right on. Dh that personality can influence not only communications but programs themselves. Okay, the other piece i would say about a brand is that it’s not just what the organization produces it’s also, how you’re perceived externally and your reputations so there’s a very fluid wall between what happens inside and what happens outside. But how do we find out this, how we’re perceived outside, you really have to do some research, and sometimes that research is done in a very on the flaw, i’ve seen organizations to great kind of on the fly, a qualitative research, they just talked to their clients, talk to their donors really kind of have a feeling for how they’re perceived other organizations it’s done through market research, you know, focus groups, surveys that kind of stuff, okay, so it doesn’t have to be a formal process now with a lot of money and expensive, not at all and that’s. One of the reasons i wrote the book brandraise ing is that none of this is rocket science. It’s it’s pretty easy to do the hardest part is knowing what to do and facilitating process, particularly with non-profits that have the right people involved and has buy-in at key junctures, so but doing research is pretty easy to do on your own. In fact, um, i talk about in the book, and i years ago recorded a podcast about how to do your own research. Okay, well, let’s, take one of the time i was going to give you a shout out for the book at the end. You go ahead. You mentioned it. So, what is the name of your book? The book is called brandraise ing and, uh, yeah, it came out in twenty ten. Published by josie bass. Okay, on dh your podcast. What was that called? The podcast is kind of. You can find it on itunes and other places, but we don’t keep it up to date is called the non-profit jungle. And we did want about doing your own research, which is about how you create a facilitators guide and facilitate informal focus groups. You can also just use two is like serving gizmo and surveymonkey to do some interesting research. If you have a list to send it to. Oh, interesting. I say a little more about that. How can we use these free tools? Well, so for instance, if you’ve got let’s, say you’ve got a donor database of a few thousand people who give to you in a mid level, and those people also get your e news, you might embed a survey and your e news and ask them just two or three questions that might help, you know, help get a sense of of what they think about your organization or why they’re connected, and and that often informs the branding work you do. But but oftentimes with branding it’s also really useful to go back to that group and to test so if, for instance, we’re re branding in non-profit we might create two different brochures and then informally walk into a programme space and grab a couple clients and say here’s two different brochures, does one speak to you more than the other? Or is there anything that you would find inappropriate or offensive about this content? You can do that with donors, tio, but, you know, that kind of field testing is often a great former research, okay, excellent and this’s all about having people well, having people understand and having a consistent message about what you do, how you do it what the outcomes are absolutely, i often remind people in the nonprofit sector that if you look at big for-profit companies like coca cola or target or starbucks, they have much more money and a much deeper bench of staff than most non-profits due to communicate, but yet you don’t see them change their color change the logo. I had a conversation with somebody here earlier about wanting to create an anniversary your logo, which i was advising her not to do because you want every type of communication you put out there to reinforce the essence of who your organization is, and i would rather that all ladder up to the core rather than being fractured. If tiffany every few years said, you know what, let’s make the box pink this year, they would lose the equity of that blue box, which is, you know, a court of their brand, but we do that all the time in the nonprofit world. It’s a bad habit it is okay, so what is the effect of how would you define an effective brand and effective brand is one where the people internally feel connected to it representative of it and ambassadors of it where everybody in the organization, whether their staff, person aboard person, maybe even a volunteer, could speak in some way about the work and its value, and that it’s perceived externally by its core audiences is valuable to so it’s, both internal and external, and i actually think it has a lot to do with the culture and the values of the organization being, you know, authentic and alive and and the visual identity or the messaging is really just an expression of that, and i could see how this would certainly helped fund-raising you can articulate it better than i can. So, yeah, let’s, just make that connection well, it does. It does have a lot of impact on fund-raising and one of the one of the most significant impacts we’re seeing more most recently is around social media and the idea that if you’re going to push out a fund-raising message, we’re going to do a multi channel campaign, which more and more organizations they’re doing. Those people are not just going to get your email or your direct mail, but they’re going to visit your website. They’re going to be on facebook, they’re going to go to twitter. And we want all of those messages to really ladder up and reinforce the the essence of what the organization’s about what the campaign is about. So, so that’s. A lot of what i’m talking about here. It fund-raising day talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Do you need a business plan that can guide your company’s growth? Seven and seven will help bring the changes you need. Wear small business consultants and we pay attention to the details. 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Ivory tower radio dot com e every time i was a great place to visit for both entertainment and education. Listening. Tuesday nights nine to eleven. It will make you smarter. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com by the way, for those around the video, the background just shook there’s, not an earthquake in times square. Somebody on the other side, i’m sure got very exuberant about whatever, whatever any, whatever their business is on the other side, and i was shaking, so no earthquake in times square dahna this is, i guess, another way of saying this is all effective communications absolute, and it needs to be resident throughout the organization you mentioned, even even down to the level of volunteers, and you’re not talking about key volunteers, but but occasional volunteer no, i mean, i think if an organization uses volunteers and they recruit them effectively, and those volunteers have a great experience, the first thing they do is go on and tell their friends about it. So they become brand ambassadors that’s not to say we should train them on the brand, per se, but it is that we should make sure they haven’t experienced that is really aware of that and and use that to our advantage. I used in my workshop this morning an example from an organization called american jewish world service that has a program for rabbinical students and when you look at how they communicate this programme on their website, they actually tell you that if you go on this program, you’re goingto be asked when you come back to do some fund-raising on behalf of it and on the program, you’re getting sort of trained to do that work, and then when you come back, they give you the tools to do that work. So that’s a great example of an organisation using a programs audience and kind of turning them into a brand new master. You have a very vivid example before of pita versus american humane society and different messaging. How does an organization find its niche within all the organizations that are doing work within that same mission? Right? Well, again, that starts with research, and one of the things that i think is very important to do is to do a competitive landscape scans so you have to know who else is out there. George in jail on twenty martignetti non-profit radio? Yes, first we’re competitive. Landscape scan. Yeah. What are we doing? What with what we’re doing is we’re identifying our peers are partners people? I’m with you too, in fact, in fact. Way every year we do like a jargon jargon article on our block, and we have words to avoid for each year, but so, you know, so for instance, if you’re in the animal rights space, who else is in that space? What are their websites? How do they communicate? What? What are the key messages they’re using? What are the colors they’re using? What? How are they describing how their unique and i think it’s really important to always be monitoring that? Always be aware of how other organizations in your space we’re communicating that’s not to say that if they use blue, you’re going to use pink or that it’s, that kind of direct. But it is to say that it’s important to remember that people on the outside might be looking at those things a donor who wants to support animal rights might look a lots of different animal rights organizations, websites, and you need to be clear how you stand out in that space. It also again goes back to strategic planning, right cause hopefully in the strategic planning process, you’ve also had a conversation about what really makes our organization unique. And what should we? Be focusing on programmatically. Is this something that a small and midsize shop could do on their own? Absolutely. You don’t feel that there’s a need for expertise to do these kinds of competitive landscape analysis. There are other things. I mean, the difference between the smaller guys and the bigger guys comes down basically to two things. The bigger guys can afford to hire experts who take him through a process. And that’s certainly is nice. But what the small guys have that the big guy’s lack is agility. And i’ve seen some smaller organizations with staff people or with volunteers go through some really exciting, you know, strategic planning and branding processes on their own. Sometimes it takes longer and there’s more learning that has to happen on the way. Really needs a champion. It needs somebody who’s, you know, able to kind of take the work, run with it, make it their own and keep it alive. But it could be done really well. Okay. Could that person be the executive director? Absolutely. Is that you? In fact, i was i was in florida a couple of years ago, and i was giving a workshop and i met a woman who had was an executive director, one man band, no staff, just her and she she had been able to recruit volunteers, developed an incredible visual identity and messaging platform for organization she’s producing all this stuff to promote it. It was great what she was doing looked better than what a lot of large organizations i see do, and it was really about her vision. It was that she understood what effective communication should be, and she wasn’t letting herself off the hook by saying, i’m just one person she garnered these resource is she needs to make it happen. It was amazing. We’re talking about personality, right? I mean, isn’t that just another way of encapsulating everything we’re talking about? Definitely found she found the personality and was expressing her, and she knew howto she knew how to enforce it. And i mean, there are organizations that really get that executive directors who really get that who appreciate the value of great creative on dh then i think one of the reasons it doesn’t happen most often is that there are a lot of organizations where the programmatic work is so important as it’s founded. And everybody’s just putting every every effort that they have into getting those program’s up and running that the name the logo, the tagline, how we talk about the work, etcetera becomes an afterthought and and oftentimes it’s on ly five years, ten years, twenty five years in that the organization starts to say, wait, these things are actually holding us back. We need teo, you know, re prioritize you mentioned something that i want to explore a little more than enforcement. We’ve been through this process. Now we’ve found our niche and where expressing it, how do we keep it in fourth? Yeah, i mean, the old model is brand policing so that’s appointing a person who really, you know is somewhat of a bully about keeping things consistence and on track the person who would write style guide, for instance, it might be it might be bigger, but these days i what i really prefer and what i would really encourage organizations to do because i think it’s much more relevant is to cultivate everybody to be a brand ambassador, right? I mean, if if a staff person, any staff person can’t go to the gala or to a block party or to whatever is going on and talk effectively about the organization that’s a problem, right? So everybody needs to be able to be an ambassador for the organization in whatever way they can. And in order to make that work, it has to be very communications have to be very, very simple, and they have to be very accessible to everybody on staff. So you mentioned a style guide style. Guides are getting more and more common in the nonprofit sector. A stock historically has been a rule book for how to use the visual identity. I actually prefer brand guide, which talks more about the communications strategy for the organization and the messaging like here’s. How you abbreviate our name. Don’t use the acronym, you know to go back to juergen instead of in the workshop i gave this morning, there was one woman whose organization goes by a i x y abila long acronym. And when she unpacks that its association you know exactly what they do with the name so it’s. A cumbersome name. But i’d rather she call it the association if she has two short handed at least there’s a clue. Who they are okay? And this trickles down to i think you’ve made you’ve made the point already everybody in the organization doesn’t your function, maybe very ministerial down to maintenance, perhaps, but you still you need to be speaking with that same organizational voice, absolutely. And if the maintenance person is on facebook and might be posting something about an event that’s going on that they were involved in helping, then you want them to feel empowered to beyond message what else? What did i not ask you that you’d like to share with small and midsize shops about about this process grand raising how it helps supports fund-raising well, i would say, you know, one one one theme we’ve touched on, but i wanted to say again is don’t give up hope just because you’re small and you can’t afford to hire an agency or whatever, that doesn’t mean you can’t do a great job. When i wrote my book, i was trying very hard to write it from a point of view of could somebody who doesn’t do this stuff every day take this and use it, and i’m hearing back from people that they can, but i’m also seeing more and more examples of organizations just really coming up with fresh, creative ways to do it. We built this scorecard that we have on our website where you can go in and sort of answer a series of questions, and it reflects back to you how your organization is doing managing its communications on one of the interesting findings we we have uncovered from that is that this small guys do it, justus well, as the big guys, that that the the having staff people or money for communications does not necessarily make you a better communicator. Excellent website is picked up dot com it’s, big duck. Nice dot com okay, don’t you ignore what i said? First big duck and dot com sarah door. Um, you want to leave one last one last tip. Come to fund-raising days. Great show. I want to see you all here next year. You’ll be back. I’ll be back. I love it here. Yeah. Sarah durham is thanks durney principle. My pleasure. Thank you very much. Principal and founder of big duck leary in n y c her book is brandraise ing and i want to thank you very much for joining me, sara and listeners viewers thank you for joining my coverage of fund-raising day two thousand thirteen marriott marquis hotel. Thanks very much. Thanks. Yes, my thanks to everyone at fund-raising day and sarah durham. To bring this show, we need some help. And i want you to know about the two companies that are helping us bradrick rally bound is a sponsor. They make simple, reliable peer-to-peer fund-raising software. This is software for runs, walks and rides it’s friends asking friends to give to your cause. You get a discount as a non pas provoc radio listener. Get that claim that discount you can go to rally bound dot com or just call them up on talk to joe mcgee and he will answer your questions and help you build your campaign. And, of course, explain how rally bound khun do that for you. They’re at rally bound dot com or triple eight seven six seven nine zero seven six and we are also supported by t b r c cost recovery yourselfer benowitz runs t brc. He will go over your past phone bills looking for errors when he finds them, which he does ninety. Percent of the time phone cos it turns out, are not so good about billing correctly. Then he picks up the phone when he finds these errors and he fights the phone company to get you money back. These are not only errors in billing, but also services that you didn’t order or you’re getting the wrong pricing, not what, not what you were supposed to be charged for, a service and also he can fight well above market pricing when he finds that, um, i had mentioned a couple weeks ago that recently he saved a non-profit almost twelve thousand dollars after finding errors in their phone bill that went back three years and you only pay ti brc if they actually get money back from the phone company, they can also save you money looking far word, because if you’ve, um, if there have been mistakes in the past, then there’s savings to be accrued going ahead as well. Trc cost recovery yussef rabinowitz i’ve known him for almost ten years. He’s at tbe rc dot com or two. One, two six double four nine. Triple xero ask for yosef twenty steak too. I hosted a panel discussion. For the new york ilsen chapter of a f p about two months ago or so that’s, the association of fund-raising professionals, the discussion was about creating a culture of philanthropy throughout your non-profit very similar to what sarah duram was talking about in having everyone be a brand ambassador from the receptionist to your ceo. There were three very smart people with me. They were terry, billy, matt bregman and brian saber. It was informative conversation, and i love the topic because it does come up a lot. How do you encourage everyone in your non-profit two treat the people they come in contact with as potential donors. It was informative, and we had some fun as well. There’s a link to the video on my block at tony martignetti dot com and that is tony’s take two for friday, the sixth of december forty seventh show of the year. Scott koegler is with me, you know him he’s, our monthly tech contributor. He’s, the editor of non-profit technology news, which you’ll find it n p tech news. Dot com and on twitter he’s at scott koegler. Scott, how are you? I’m doing well, tony, how you terrific lee. Thank you very much. You have a good thanksgiving. I did way too much turkey. But, you know that’s to be expected. Alright, good. You had fun. He did. We’re talking about safeguarding your donordigital. What are the, uh what of the potential risks here if donordigital is compromised? Well, there’s a lot of risks. You actually tony and what’s probably the biggest one is that not just the the data is stolen, but the information about your donors is compromised and that’s something that has made a whole lot of headlines recently well, over the last few years actually, um about, you know, different different companies having having their data breached, having there credit card information stolen and now people losing, losing the privacy of the credit information identity theft by another word. So there are implications that are certainly public relations you don’t want to be, you know, it may not be a headline if you’re a smaller midsize shop, but you can have a public relations problem among your donors and volunteers without it being in the headlines. There’s legal implications and you couldn’t even have, like some financial problems mean if people if it comes to the point of people suing you? Are you having to pay for damages? Definitely. Definitely. You know that i moved to south carolina recently, and last year i think that was earlier this year. Actually, the the the state governments website was breached. And supposedly all of the information that that anyone who has filed tax returns in the state oh, my goodness is stolen. So, you know, i mean that’s bad enough. I haven’t actually heard of anyone who was, you know, was affected by having their identities going. But what happened was that the state, aside from the, you know, the political and and other kinds of just general discussion about how things were handled badly, they had to offer a free subscription service to an identity theft, monitoring service to literally everyone in the state. Oh, my and a couple people. And so on, top of on top of having to rebuild their infrastructure, you know, tighten down their security, you know, they have that financial burden, you know, just added things. So yeah, financial consequences definitely did this stuff the car during the five days when governor mark sanford was off with his girlfriend in in argentina is that when that happened, it could have i don’t know, i you know, it could have been an argentinean internet connection get part of the story his reputation has since been rehabilitated because he was he was elected. Tio what the house of representatives, i think for for south carolina? I think so. Although i have to have two admit that i haven’t really followed much of the south carolinian political situation, even though i should have. Okay, well, you’re you’re new resident. Well, i am your break now. Good vote. So, i guess it’s good. What part of the problem with identity theft, though, is that people the bad people don’t use the data right away because they know that everybody who’s data was compromised is on the lookout, but they’ll wait. I mean, they’ll wait three for five years and use the data then when your date of birth and social security number haven’t changed and maybe even your address hasn’t changed. And and by then people are not on the lookout for the for the theft. Because it’s been so many years since it occurred. Exactly exactly. And then it’s also hard to track down. Where that breach came from because if it wass, for instance, a small provider, small company or a small non-profit that got that breached, uh, may not have been reported, right? Not everybody owns up to it, and actually not everybody actually knows that they’ve been breached. Right rights, it’s not in the hacker’s best interest to notify anyone that had that data. Yeah, yeah, now it gets it gets discovered by some audit. Or maybe the hackers will sloppy or something like that, but yeah, i’m sure there are lot of instances where organization don’t even know that it’s happened. All right, so if we’re going to protect our donordigital what we need to be thinking about first? Well, the first thing is pretty obvious stuff is that, you know, if you don’t need the information, don’t keep it, don’t collect it, don’t get it one of the pieces of information, of course, that non-profits do. On whose credit card information, uh, and some sites you know, amazon in particular, and pretty much any e commerce site collect credit card information and then there’s a convenience to the chopper. We’ll store that information? Yes. And, you know it’s convenient. And in a situation like amazon, people may go back there and by things you know, almost daily, and so in that case, it really is a convenience, so you don’t want to. I don’t want to keep entering my my credit card information every time i buy something for a non-profit that that frequency is probably significantly less than what amazon gets and we would certainly hope with it it’s more frequent, but reality is they’re probably talking about a few times a year at the most. Yes, so in those cases allow the credit card information to the energy. Be sure that it’s over a secure line and that’s here’s a jug and peace for https that’s uh uh that’s the secure website connections that links the website that someone beat feeling to the with the back end server some reason, scott, i know that http is hypertext transfer protocol, right? And then i believe that as few yeses for secure okay, sorry, sorry. Nobody cares about nobody cares. Um, so and that part right there just means that someone monitoring are tapping into the line isn’t just catching the data while it’s streaming by them on dh collecting it that way. That’s the first line of security, but the second, you know, use the information, make the transaction, get the get the donation into the bank account, and then just don’t record the critical information, right? Just by doing that i could probably solve. I’m going to say at least fifty percent of the of the problems that a data breach can cause for constituents for donors. There’s other information that would fall into those to that category, i’m thinking, like date of birth, social security number, even even address? Yeah, address an email. I mean, you don’t want those to be compromised. Yeah, here’s an interesting piece of the security information. Did you know if you have a person’s first name your date of birth and their zip code, you can find out through there first name, date of birth and zip code that’s enough to identify? Yeah, yeah, that makes sense way, wouldn’t you? Yeah, when you say it, it makes sense, but somebody wouldn’t think that those if you’re not, if you’re not in a security role, you wouldn’t realize that those three things can be really damaging and you could find everything about those so i mean, date of birth, i mean, probably non-profits don’t have to save date of birth, right? Date of birth, you know? Krauz they probably do need address information in order to send maybe a ten, ninety nine, you know, donation form at the end of the right, right? But certainly so security number is not necessary. I don’t. I don’t think that’s required for a ten, ninety nine. Well, non-profits aren’t sending ten, ninety nine’s. They’re just sending the just sending acknowledgement letters. Okay, so, yeah, ten. Ninety nine’s that’s for contractors. So so wouldn’t you wouldn’t need it. You wouldn’t need you would not need it for donors. All right, but so there’s there’s information that we should save, but we should look scrupulously at what we are actually preserving is the point. Okay, what we need and don’t even ask for what you don’t need and those things that you do need, you know, on a on a short term basis, like credit card information. Just really okay. Okay. There’s still information that you need and there’s information that you want to keep. You want to keep the name, you know, the donation history, maybe. Their activities, you may want to keep their their their address, and they want it. Particularly if you do send out snail mail. Kind of, uh, information. You know, newsletters do still go by on paper. And so there is information that you want and here’s one of the ways that south carolina system was breached. No, if they could have avoided the entire disaster with the effects of the disaster. Maybe not for a public relations standpoint, but from the effect on its citizens. By encrypting the data they have. So wait, he talked about, you know, using a secure internet connection tps. And that applies and encryption to all of the information going across the internet wire. But once it reaches the program of stories that data, um, you know, that data is stored in a database and the database is usually, um, pretty transparent. In other words, you can open the database. Look at the information and it’s you know, it’s in english. It’s in what’s, commonly called clear text. So it’s, you know, you can look at it with a human being can read it and understand it. And i know it’s easy and it’s the way that things are stored most of time. What south carolina did not do on. Actually, a couple of others didn’t dio notable ones are adobe and link them okay. Not small names of people that you would think would know better. Um, they did not encrypt the contents of their database. So what that means is if the data is not encrypted, hacker gets in, they download the database and they can use it’s all visible in clear text. Okay. Okay. All right. So so the data that we do store, we should consider encryption, right? Absolutely. Absolutely their encryptions pretty easy. Most databases have it as a non option. You could just, you know, take a box and bingo. It’s all encrypted. So we have to also consider where this data is safe, right? It’s lots of different places and including portables buy-in night. Um, sure, cellphones get lost, laptops gets stolen, all those kind of things happen. I don’t know that. There’s an additional answer there. I mean, certainly you can password protect cell phones and laptops for typically people don’t do that. Yeah, well, we’re going to get to policies that they should be doing so. But they’re also the data is on servers. In your and hopefully your server closet is secure. I’ve seen a lot of servers that including businesses, small businesses where, you know it’s in a like a ah whole janitorial closet or something up on a shelf, not secure it all, but data can also be in the cloud. Uh, exactly that it could be in the cloud and it’s kind of a counterintuitive. I’ll just give you my personal take on this. I think on i believe that the data that’s stored in a no properly created cloud environment it was much more secure than something that’s residing in your server. Have your office. Okay, why don’t i tell you why? First of all, servers in officers are managed fly, but people in those officers typically and except for, you know, very large non-profits most of those people are not, um, it’s, not a full time job to manage the security of the service right there doing other things. They have a full time job for a part time job and a piece of a part of a tiny portion of that time maybe to make a backup of the server, on the other hand, cloud based systems it is their business, it’s, the only business, and not only are the, uh, typically bound by terms and conditions of the contract with that you have with them to protect your data, if if they’re breached, uh, they stand to lose their entire business just from the bad p r so it’s in their best interest to keep their, you know their customers, clients, data secure, you know, they those kinds of environments, too, support the https secure connections they do typically encrypt the data. I’m not saying you don’t need to check those things, but i do believe that it’s, no overall, safer environment, leave it in the hands of the professionals. Okay, way. Have to go away for a couple minutes when we come back. Scott. Now, keep talking about safeguarding your donordigital. We’ll get into some of the policies that you should have. Stay with us. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. I’m dana ostomel, ceo of deposit, a gift. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. All right, scott, we know what data we’ve got and what we need to save and not save way we know where the data is stored, what kind of policies should we have in place? Yeah, well, as you mentioned, it’s it’s a good thing to have a policy that says, you know, you need to secure your devices with a password so that every time you go to use that needs to be logged in, um, in my experience that that may work in corporate environments where the shop has the ability to actually manage the devices that were used by their weather employees, but in an environment that says generally as loose as a non-profit think becomes pretty difficult to enforce. For one thing, you know, you’re your volunteers may all that they have bones that are being managed by their brother employers. So you get a conflict in that in that area, i’m still it’s a good thing to do. Certainly you want to be sure that the staff isn’t writing things down on pieces of paper, so if they are recording things, they are being recorded in a digital format in a secure format so that whatever protections are being enforced in the inn that digital connection are being used, they may not be one hundred percent, but it’s better than nothing for sure. We should also have policy around who has access to different pieces of data, absolutely, and that has to do with the, uh, the applications that you use in historian information some of the more simplistic application, for instance, locally, you know, homemade databases, spreadsheets, things like that have very limited security options, right? Most of the most of the non-profit applications that are available commercially have what they call multi level rules so you can define a roll of manager out of the data entry clerk, you know, hosting volunteer and different kinds of rules like that, and each one of those can have different levels of access to information. So somebody who’s carrying around a tablet that in the event registering people for the event, they only have access to the data entry function for that piece, it certainly would not have access two historical e-giving and other other information has already been recorded when i go teo cem, clients on i’m using their database there’s data that i can’t see? Social security number. For instance, i i can see that it’s preserved, but all i see in that field is a bunch of stars. Date of birth, i think is another one. Or maybe i see the year, but not the day in the month. Something like that. So there there are there are data, ways of preserving and i log on to that database so it knows who i am and what level of access i have. Exactly. When i was, that reminds me of when i was in the air force, i had i had top secret clearance. And then beyond top secret, there was something called psyop. Yes, i which was it was his top secret. T s psyop was the single integrated operating plan. And then, yes, i was for extra sensitive information. So you could have t s and then you could go beyond that, and then beyond that. And then there’s, you know, obviously there people bled levels of security clearance beyond me. But i had top secret c i a p ece anyway, so so just exactly as you told me that tony means you have to kill me right now. There. Are other reasons i need to kill you. Is that another doing? Just revealed. Okay. All right. So the software can help us. All right. So this is part of our policies is who who has access to what? On a need to know basis, right? That’s, basically, what do you need to know? To do your job? Exactly. And there’s one two things i’ll bring up here one is that, you know most well, most a lot of instances of breach come from, uh, not getting rid of logging access. That is not necessary any longer. So someone leaves the organization. The very first thing that should be done is that log in should be deactivated. Deleted whatever. Yes, at the very least. Password changed. But there are lots of lots of instances where that wasn’t done immediately. And the data, you know, goes away and let’s face it. You know, it’s it’s, not just a friendly departure. That person is more likely to take action immediately than they are, you know, a month down the road. So quick action is is really, uh, you know the right thing to do. Let’s, talk a little about insurance. There’s there’s. Cyber insurance there is dahna and, you know, i haven’t really looked at the prices for those, but i’m sure that there is based on the amount of information, the value of your database, all those kind of things, but i would say that most of the large insurance company i’m looking at the hartford and shove, for instance, they offer what’s called a data breach insurance, which is exactly what we’re talking about here, its protection against loss, its protection against lawsuits from some problems occurring based on the loss, liability, all those nothing i would say it’s definitely something we’re looking into. And of course, you know, hindsight will always tell you that you should have done it. Yeah, but, you know, pryce will make that determination for you, okay? We’re not holding you to the standards of of an insurance broker, so you don’t need to know the price, but but important for people to know that it exists and and as you suggested, you know, if you have a bad person, maybe they left on bad terms or maybe they’re still working for you, and they just have some bad intentions. No policy is going to prevent them from getting what they want if they’re if they’re industrious enough like and an interesting statistic. Seventy five percent of a raw data theft and i’m talking well, i guess it could be called hacking, but they left. This use of data happens internally of that seventy five percent, fifty percent of it is from physical, just physically copying the data onto a thumb drive. Or, you know, some other cd or something like that. So it really, you know, most of what’s gonna happen is really gonna happen within the organization and that’s for anything. And this heartening, unfortunately true. You’re a former ceo, right? Chief information officer, chief technology officer on the corporate side. Um what? What more do you want to impart? I haven’t asked you about, uh, you know, lock the doors. That’s, that’s probably the biggest and most difficult thing that we had to contend with was making sure that the facility is secure. Now, those when i was doing that, cloud computing was really not a big issue. So locking the doors, you know, for a cloud environment doesn’t really does it really work. That said, there are still, uh, there’s still paper records that your store in camp, almost any organization and locking the doors were locking the file cabinets or some other way, securing access against the paper records. Still it’s still the right thing to do, and we’ll we’ll avoid some of the day. The fact that we’re talking about yes, excellent. We’ve been talking about digitised data, but there’s still lots of paper records and just simple locks on a file cabinet on blocks on doors, andan that server door that you know that those hallway closet server that i see where it’s the maintenance you know, it’s it’s above the slop sink that’s crazy frank, right it is and have one one other issue that we talked about and that is what’s called social engineering and has nothing to do with data. Uh, it’s it’s really old fashioned and involved. Usually telephone, but it could be personal. Personal face-to-face okay, you know, we talked about the three pieces of information that will lead to someone really knowing who you are like that, uh, your first name, date of birth and your zip code. You may not say all those things to the same person at the same. Time, but, uh, social engineering involves people making phone calls into an organization, talking to different people and pulling different pieces of information from those different people and then assemble in those outside so they’re pretty easy to, you know, called secretary and they, you know, i’m trying to get the three owners birthday gift, you know, what? They were on dh, you know, by the way, you know, at another person calls in to another person in the organization and says, you know what? Town today with them? I mean, no, there you go right there. Three piece of information, yes. Wow. That’s okay, those air bad there’s a bad actors, but but if somebody want that they can, they can put it together over time. And andi, even if even a small organization, even if there aren’t that many people, if they can call they could do it over time, they can have a have ah, accomplice maybe helping. So one time it’s a man a couple weeks later, it’s a woman asking different things. Your office isn’t going to protect against that exactly. Then we’re not as people, we’re not wired to think, you know, in that. Kind of devious way to protect ourselves. Okay. All right. All the more reason for thinking about this thing about cyber insurance, i think. Exactly. Exactly. All right, we have just a couple of minutes left. Scott, i’m going to put you on the scott on the i’m going to put you on the scott. I’m going to put you on the spot for a holiday wine recommendation as part of your as your sixty second style stop. Whoa, what wine do you loving? In the month of december? A month of december, we actually we found one that we absolutely love. It’s it’s the two thousand ten it’s called immortal it’s zampa dollars. You might expect it’s just it’s, you know, luxurious it’s. Wonderful. And it’s. Got that typical in-kind of sweetness and smooth with a lot of food. Uh, that fifty bucks and i, you know, been enjoying that one. Okay. That’s a that’s, a red zinfandel or white red’s. Okay, two thousand ten immortals in scott koegler sixty second style. Stop, scott. Always a pleasure. Enjoy your holidays. Thank you very much. Good to talk to you. Thanks so much for your help, scott koegler on twitter. He’s at scott koegler konigstein are and he’s, the editor of non-profit technology news, which is that n p tech news. Dot com next week, the millennials study derek feldman will be with me. I’m pretty sure he’ll be in the studio. He’s, co author of that report also amy sample, ward she’s, our social media contributor and ceo of non-profit technology network and ten she returns next week. Remember our supporters rally bound dot com and tb rc dot com. I’m very grateful for their support. They’re good people. Please check them out. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is at the board, as our line producer shows. Social media is by deborah askanase of community organizer two point oh, and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. This excellent music is by scott stein. Oh, i hope to be with me next week that’ll be friday, december thirteenth. The, uh i don’t know which friday of the year it is, but it’ll be at one to two eastern at talking alternative dot com. You didn’t think that shooting getting thinking. You’re listening to the talking alternative network duitz get in. E-giving cubine are you a female entrepreneur ready to break through? Join us at sexy body sassy sol, where women are empowered to ask one received what they truly want in love, life and business. Tune in thursday, said noon eastern time to learn timpson juicy secrets from inspiring women and men who, there to define their success, get inspired, stay motivated and defying your version of giant success with sexy body sake. Sold every thursday ad. 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If you have big dreams and a small budget, you have a home at tony martignetti non-profit radio friday’s wanto to eastern talking alternative dot com. Are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office needs better leadership, customer service sales, or maybe better writing, are speaking skills. Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is intact with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications. That’s. The answer. Talking.

135: Discover Your Brand & Content Marketing – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Nadia Tuma, brand innovation strategist with clark | mcdowall.

Scott Koegler, editor of Nonprofit Technology News.

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

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Metoo hyre hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, i’m your aptly named host. I want to wish you cog, posca, so make i hope i’m saying happy easter in, i’m trying to say happy easter in hebrew and ah and happy passover in italian is born passat born peskay it’s march twenty ninth, two thousand thirteen and i very much hope that you were with me last week. I’d be disgusted to hear that you had missed irs sale in aisle four o three b evan giller, a founding member of the law firm of giller and calhoun, explained, the i r s is fifty percent off the penalty sale for four o three b retirement plans that are not in compliance. Many plans are not up to code, and this is the year to fix the problems we talked about the common mistakes and what to do and compensation clarity are regular legal contributors jean takagi and emily chan of the san francisco law group, the non-profit and exempt organizations group answer these questions how do you determine what’s reasonable compensation for executives? What happens if camp is excessive? And what’s that automatic penalty that kicks in if you don’t properly disclose benefits. We did a mock board meeting and i walked out remember i had sound effects and everything. I’m amusing myself if you refuse to be amused. I’m amusing myself last week. I want to make something clear. Last week i had said that gary vaynerchuk, gary v you may know him as had been on last week, which would’ve been two weeks ago. He was scheduled to but he had to reschedule for may. Well, have him in may and i just want to make it clear i was not drinking last week. I had recorded the show many weeks ago, back when gary was still going to keep his promise. But then he broke his promise, but he made up for it. We love we love gary. I’m just getting gary in case any of his entourage is listening. We like gary v and he’s coming this week. Discover your brand nadia touma is a brand innovation strategist with clark i mcdowell that’s not an eye there’s no period it’s clark vertical line mcdonnell that’s very dramatic clark vertical line, vertical mcdonald, your brand i’m glad not he’s laughing. She hopefully realizes that i wrote this copy. So i know it’s, not an eye. Your brand goes much deeper than logo in tagline i hope you recognize that what’s the process to discover your brand strategy. And once you’ve found it, how do you manage it? Nadia and i will discuss all that also content marketing scott koegler returns he’s, our regular tech contributor the editor of non-profit technology news what content should you post for consumption? And where should you be putting it? How do you start your content? Marketing scott and i will discuss that between the guests on tony’s take two planned giving is part of your fund-raising team that’s what’s on my block this week, i’ve got some simple ways that planned giving can support the rest of your fund-raising my pleasure now to welcome and introduce nadia christina touma she’s, a brand innovation strategist with clark mcdonnell i guess you know it’s probably supposed to articulate the vertical line. It was an ampersand you’d say clark end, but it’s not supposed to be clark vertical line mcdonnell just clark macdonald that’s where she’s an a brand strategy innovation ist her work is creating and revitalizing brands in our swiftly changing world. She’s on the faculty of the school of visual arts, s via the masters in branding program, where she teaches brand strategy. She has worked with non-profits such as slow food and why i see in the pittsburgh concert society and in college at carnegie mellon university. She had a minor in piano performance, and we’re going to talk a little about that, too. Nadia touma, welcome to the studio. Thanks for having me, tony it’s. A pleasure. Glad to see you laughing already. Very good. Um, co-branding i think there’s a lot of misconceptions about what a brand is. What? What? What is branding? Well, that is a very good question. First one out of the box. Alright. Alright. Complimentary. You could stay the whole hour. With pleasure. Ah, i often get that question. A lot of people don’t quite know what branding is. I have a lot of confusion even within my family and my closest friends there. Not sure exactly what i d’oh. I think the best way to describe branding is to define it as what? It’s not co-branding is not. Ah, brand strategy is not marketing it’s, not advertising its not a logo it’s, not pr. It is actually the foundation. And the strategy is really the backbone of all of those things that it will then effect. So, you know, a brand strategy consists of things like a mission, a vision, reasons for being the dna of what a company and its products stand for you. And then all of those marketing pr efforts are executions off that strategy. All right? And then you have to maintain your strategy once you’ve once you’ve devised it well, not only maintain that’s very important maintain, but also stay relevant and state different. So it requires connection to the world connection to your consumer. You know, the world is not stagnant, and neither should have brand be stagnant. S o you have a very solid foundation, but you have to move with the times as well. Now, how do world renowned brands like apple? You know, nike, how did they create that that aura around them? And you just say apple and people think of steve jobs, and they think of beautiful design and innovation and slightly expensive products. But how did they how did they had to create that well, that’s, really the magic question and that’s, why people like me exist which is to help companies really create that magic, but at a very fundamental level there are couple characteristics that make a brand very strong, one of which is its first of all, that it’s relevant, that it’s relevant to people’s, lives to companies, lives. Another important characteristic is that its distinctive so it has to be relevant. But it also needs to be somewhat unique um, and somewhat special in a way that the delights people there’s also another really wonderful thing that strong brands do, which is they defined categories, and they almost shift culture in a way. So if you think about really strong brands like apple, for instance, you know they’ve really changed the way we interact with the world, with music, with movies, with people, you know, and those very, very strong brands are able to almost do that and shifting culture, which is really cool. All right, so let’s, let’s, bring this to the to the small and midsize non-profit level. You talked about a lot of things in developing the brand strategy, but so let’s let’s. Try to flush this out. How do you how do you start? Toe create your strategy. What? What you want to be? Yeah, and that’s oftentimes the biggest challenges actually understanding. What is it? What is our reason for being? Why do we exist? And that’s challenging? Because a lot of times there might be differing opinions or different objectives within an organization within a midsize non-profit but but every non-profit has a mission statement almost always go to the home page it’s a simple pull down it’s right there in front. They all have a mission and you in a vision. So, isn’t that. Isn’t that the basis or there might even be some the differences of opinion? Despite that? Yeah, i know a lot of times the mission statement it could have been written by, you know, someone who founded it years ago, and it may not be as relevant or the way in which it’s interpreted might not be consistent across people who are making decisions everyday within that organization. Eso when we think about a mission statement it’s, you know, it’s sort of a first level and that needs to be agreed upon, of course, but from there there other components like understanding who were retargeting what’s our consumer, our audience, you know, what exactly do we offer, even from not just a functional standpoint, but an emotional standpoint, even if you’re just a midsize non-profit that’s all very important. S o sometimes mission statements, vision statements are written without those components in mind. And so that’s what needs to be really fleshed out internally, say, a little more about the emotion? Yeah, so you know every organization, whether you know, whether you’re lady gaga or your you know, proctor and gamble, you’re offering functional things, so you’re offering toilet paper or you’re offering entertainment and music, but you’re also offering, and i don’t think lady gaga uses ivory, so probably not right. I don’t think she uses anything anyone else used, but from an emotional standpoint, you also have to deliver something right brands need to make you feel something on dh. So even if your say, you know a local music organization that promotes local talent, there needs to be something emotional that the audience gets from using you. Otherwise you become just purely functional, and a purely functional offering is not a complete brand and we can articulate all the all this i mean, we can pull all this into ah ah, cohesive statement and understanding among all our different constituents are bored are our staff are sea level people, the people who are benefiting from our services, whether they’re students or or the homeless way? Yeah, absolutely. And what’s actually critical when you’re implementing ah, brand vision or a brand strategy is to get buy in from every level of the organization. So everyone who’s doing the accounting? Teo being a spokesperson, teo, you know, being the ceo all need to believe it’s it’s the difference i often tell my students it’s a difference between interacting with a customer service representative it zappos, who clearly believes in the brand to buying something at duane reade and interacting with the checkout person, okay? Or maybe state government, maybe that’s all right, that’s a good example of the other end of the day. Yeah, okay. We’re gonna take a break. We’re going to dive more into detail about how to develop your strategy, what that process is about. So now he has certainly stays with me. And i hope that you do too talking. Alternative radio. Twenty four hours a day. Are you confused about which died it’s, right for you? Are you tired of being tired? How about improving your energy strength and appearance? Hi, i’m ricky keck, holistic nutrition and wellness consultant. If you have answered yes to any of my questions, contact me now at n y integrated health dot com, or it’s, six for six to eight, five, eight five eight eight initiate change and transform your life. Are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership, customer service, sales, or maybe better writing, are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stopped by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications. That’s, the hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com buy-in durney welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent got tons of live listener love china so well represented. Young jang kun ming chung ching, shanghai, shenyang, wuhan. I’ve been to wuhan and i’ve been to shanghai. Shi on is not there. I was in shi on to where she on left fans behind and she on i thought. But china chinese ni hao. Very nice to have you with us and seoul, korea and day. John korea. Very nice to have you with us on your haserot here in the u s new york, new york. Welcome, smithtown, new york. Welcome. Will smith times at long island, i think i think it’s long island welcome live listen, love tto all those live listeners and more to come. Okay, nadia touma. We’re talking about the importance of branding here. By the way, when you become a partner in your firm, i want you to tell them you want an ampersand before your name. Okay? Not the verdict. I don’t care what kind of equity they offer you a share in the corporate jet. You want not the vertical line. You want to be end too much, really? The memo percent um okay, let’s, go let’s, get into this process a little. Now all these all these constituents need to be involved. You mention from accountants to board members at sea level. Bonem what do we what do we start this this process with if we want to develop our brand well, there’s, just like they’re possibly dozens of definitions of what brand strategist do there’s also many ways in which a process khun begin. I’ll tell you my personal perspective. I truly i truly believe that partnering with whoever you’re working with is incredibly important. So getting together say, your ah brand strategy agency or you’re working on your own, getting together with that client and really sitting down and understanding what’s the issue what’s at stake what do your objectives try to understand? What’s our goal and together as a team really outline what a success look like. You know, it’s really define what those girls look like and parameters, you know, what’s what can we change what’s off limits? You know what can we not touch from there? I think it’s really important to get the perspectives of a lot of different stakeholders within that. Organization and try to understand is there are other inconsistencies among them in terms of what the mission is, what the vision is. Do they see the company going in different directions? Do they see in a different place in five years? What are the different strengths and weaknesses that various parties see? Understanding even that is an insight is to understand what’s our current situation. You know where the inconsistencies, where the commonalities and from there, we can start to create a common goal. So there’s a lot of conversation, a lot of interviewing focus groups. Is that is that it was that all part of this? Well, focus groups come a little bit later. So once you do wanna interview internally and understand what’s going on within, because the change will have to happen from within. So getting a good read on that is really the first step. Okay on, i did survey listeners before the show on dass cked in the past five years, have you given considerable thought to your brand strategy? A little more than half said yes. About close to sixty percent said yes. And then about fourteen percent said no and about a third said, i’m not sure what brand strategy means i better listen to the show, so i hope those listen, i hope you’re on. I hope they’re either in china, japan or smith down listening, all right, but no more than half have feel that they have given a lot of thought within the past five years. Well, i think in the past five years, there’s been a sea change in the perspective of brand strategy. I’ve seen it absolutely well, i think that brand i mean it’s still a nebulous term that clearly people aren’t quite sure what it means. I think that there’s been quite a shift recently in going going from financial measures on ly in terms of measuring success to trying to build in metrics that measure the quality of your brand as well. I think cmos and ceos are recognizing the importance of having a strong brand in addition to the bottom line. Now, cmo is a very common term for you, but here on the show we have drug in jail on i would hate wade. You have a female ward for for george in jail offenders cmo so that all the listeners know what you’re talking about, chief marketing officer excellent does a lot of non-profits certainly don’t have cme owes a lot of this falls right on the executive director or maybe a communications and marketing staff but might not be a chief marketing officer. All right, so we’ve gathered all this information from all the different constituents, and i think including importantly, people who are benefiting from the work that we do a zay said earlier, whether they’re students or they’re the hungry who you’re feeding the batter to your sheltering them in there, they’re certainly included, we have all this information. Now what? How do we coalesce this what we’re looking for, right? So i think that once we’ve understood what’s going on internally, we want to then turn r r face toe to the outside world and understand who are we affecting? So is that the hungry? Is that students and decide who was it really that were after? And i don’t mean after in a predatory sense, i mean, in terms of who’s, our audience, who are we trying to read? That’s actually an incredibly important part of it to really define that target audience on and i don’t just mean to finding it in terms of demographics, so you hear a lot of terms thrown around, like males eighteen to thirty four or moms with kids or the baby boomers. The reality of it is that each of those groups has shades and shades of different types of people so it’s more important to understand. Are you looking at moms with kids who are into organic food or, you know, are you looking at males eighteen to thirty four who are married and, you know, working full time or are things like that that that add texture to who you’re looking at and then it’s important to understand? Let me ask you when you’re doing that? Do you ever devise hypothetical people? Absolutely had guests? I’ve had two guests in the past. You have talked about that for in terms of marketing strategy. Yeah, about that oh, that’s. Incredibly important. So we call them creating personas on dh it’s. Really? It’s it’s wonderful to do with clients. Because i think one of the pitfalls of working all the time with inman organization is you start to see your audience as a number or, you know, a cell. In an exception, a stereotype of some complete stereotype and it’s. Amazing to see the way in which top level executives will react. Teo very well fleshed out persona and what i mean by persona is outlining the person as if they truly were a person. What do they like to do in their free time? What brands do they use in other categories? That’s incredibly important. What’s their education level. Where did they go to school? Where do they like to vacation? And you really bring that person toe life and they become someone that is relatable. And in that sense, i think you create better solutions, theun just saying, while we need to increase exp i twenty five percent and why by sixteen percent do you give those personas? Name’s? Vivian? Oh, yes. Oh, yes. And a lot of work goes into that is, well, really the name? Yeah, sure. We’re okay. All right, all right. So i made you tigress labbate because that’s interesting cause the other guests i said have made the same point sabat so we’re coalescing this invention that we’re going outside. Are we doing interviews with with these potential personas? Were trying to meet people who fit the description of these different personas absolutely, i think that the most important thing to do is to talk to your consumer, and it’s really brings it to life. You, khun do surveys. My personal preference is to go out into the world and really interact with who you’re going to be speaking with on dh that could be done in a variety of ways. So ethnography zehr quite popular, and that means don’t get into that jail again, jack in jail ethnography xero when you go into the audience is natural habitat really so to speak? So if you’re studying, you know the way in which people consume alcohol, you might be going to bars or their homes before they go out. If you’re, you know, studying perhaps skin care, you might go and observe someone shopping for skin care. So you really want teo me? Clearly, it won’t be a pure experience because you’re their jotting down notes and you know, you’re obviously observing, but you do get to see those those nuances that you might you might not get if you’re in a focus group facility. Not to say that those air not incredibly valuable because they are one of the things you get from focused group that you don’t get in other types of qualitative research is that you get social interaction, so you’re watching people react to things, and then maybe another person says something that sparks another thing, and then someone else builds on that and you start to get these incredibly rich insights from whatever stimulus you’re bringing in. Nadia touma is a brand innovation strategist with clark mcdole, which you’ll find on the web at clark with no, no, eat the end. Mcdowell, m, c d o w a l l clark macdonald, dot com what types of questions are you asking these people? Well, that all really depends. It depends on the objectives of what you’re trying to find out. So if you’re if you’re doing just straight consumer package good type research such as skin care, alcohol or you nutrition shake or something of that nature you’re trying to understand really the needs behind it. One of the things that is let’s think let’s, bring it to a non-profit sure you’ve worked with a music and arts group in the past. Yes, i suppose it is. A small arts group. What what? What are we trying to find out from their their their constituents? Eso for example, for this small arts organization that i worked with, they sponsored and showcased local classical musicians in a recital setting. And they were having an issue with their audience. There wasn’t enough of coming to these recitals. So really it’s it’s not just saying, why are people not coming to a recital? That’s sort of just scratching at the surface? What you really want to try to understand or what are those unmet needs that is, is prohibiting them from coming, right? So what are those barriers that miss making people do something else rather than come here? And i think that’s really actually across the board what you want to find out and that’s incredibly challenging because people don’t know what they don’t want. So it’s very hard for them to tell you what they’re looking for, why they chose something else, exactly, or its group or a college why they chose it. Okay, so how do you start to get to this s o that’s? Really? Where the art meets the science it’s really that’s when you have to really sit down and create a solid methodology, and what that means is you really need to thaw. I almost think about what you’re trying to get first and work your way backwards. So if i’m trying to understand, you know what is really driving? Ah, consumer, not to go to our side and go to a football game instead really try to break that down in a way that gets sort of a roundabout way to get to them. You would never ask them. Why are you going to the football game rather than the recital? You’re trying to understand it a deeper level? What is that that makes them feel fulfilled? What is it that makes them feel happy with their free time? And then you have to do a lot of the back work to fill in those gaps. This is very esoteric. It’s. We call them leaps there you really have? Tio i almost asked around the question and look at that negative space in a way, and then make those connections to understand what’s missing. Okay, so all right, so now you’ve got your internal constituents, your external constituents. You’ve made some leaps. In judgment, there must be some kind of testing of what of the leaps that you’ve made, and the the early conclusion that you’re starting to draw? Absolutely. And this is when you bring it all together. So as you said, we spoke internally. We understood what was going there. We understand what’s going on in the outside world. And then now you need to bring it together and say, okay, what makes sense here if we have x and y parameters internally and this is what success looks like? And then this is the opportunity that we’re seeing in the outside world. How do we marry the two? How do we make a solution that makes sense given constraints, opportunities, but the organization and then what we see, as you know that that really juicy white space in the outside trying to bridge this gap you are between opportunity and on reality. Exactly. Okay, and so a lot of times, what will happen is you might have you might find these incredibly lofty, wonderful opportunities out in the world. And then what ends up happening is you do have to bring them down to earth based on what’s, actually. Possible on then. So there’s a process of testing on then what? What’s the end result of all this that’s a great question. Another one? Yeah, two out of twenty five. So it can take the shape of any number of things so it might end up being just a brief, you know, a word documentary, power point dahna document or it could be something that’s a little bit more of emmanuel, but essentially, what you’re giving is a set of guidelines. So, you know, you you should recount the journey that you’ve taken with the client so they can see how do we get here? You know, what does that look like? And then once you’ve told that story, you outlined things like, ok, what is our positioning mission vision statement? What does it look like when we apply that to our pr? What does that look like when we apply that to our visual identity? How do we talk about ourselves? All of these sorts of sort of guidelines to help you talk about that strategy that you’ve created? How do we talk about ourselves in terms of actual words and maybe stories that we tell or or things like that? Yeah. I mean, it’s it’s, all those executions i talked about at the beginning of our conversation. You know, what is advertising look like? What is marketing look like? Not from a here is a an ad, but thank you. Here are here’s a type of language you should be using here. The types of colors you should be using. The tone, the personality, all of these things that affect the way someone might interpret your brand. How do you feel that, uh, musical performance overlaps with with the work that you’re doing? How does that inform your work? Well, i would say that generally speaking toe work and brand, you just have to be curious. Keep your eyes open, be interested in a lot of different things because you have to make a lot of esoteric connections all the time. So music is just one of those other things that sort of opens your eyes and ears and fingers and a very different way exactly. And share what? What it is that you love about the work that doings. Clearly, you enjoy it very much. Very passionate about it. What? What is it that moves you? About what you’re doing, you know it, it’s it’s incredibly interesting because you are studying people and you’re studying societies and how people feel about things and make decisions, you know, ultimately, companies really are creating products and services for a changing world, and that means that you have to study the world and study interactions and connection and what you love about all that it’s incredibly interesting to be a part of and does the nature of the business is you’re always working on a different type of industry and a different type of consumer. So you’re always learning, you know, deeply about a lot of different types of things, thanks very much for being a guest, not here. Thank you for having me. Pleasure. Nadia touma is a brand innovation strategist with clark mcdowell at clark mcdowell dot com right now we take a break, and when we come back tony’s take two about plant e-giving as part of your fund-raising team. And then scott koegler returns and he and i are going to talk about content marketing. Stay with me. You couldn’t do anything to getting dink dink dink dink. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Get him! Nothing. Good. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Hi, i’m lost him a role, and i’m sloan wainwright, where the host of the new thursday morning show the music power hour. Eleven a m. We’re gonna have fun. Shine the light on all aspects of music and its limitless healing possibilities. We’re gonna invite artists to share their songs and play live will be listening and talking about great music from yesterday to today, so you’re invited to share in our musical conversation. Your ears will be delighted with the sound of music and our voices. Join austin and sloan live thursdays at eleven a. M on talking alternative dot com. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Oppcoll hi, i’m kate piela, executive director of dance, new amsterdam. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Welcome back time for tony’s take two at roughly thirty two minutes into the hour. My block this week is planned e-giving is part of your fund-raising team i’ve got there five strategies for using planned giving to help other parts of your fund-raising there’s no reason that plan giving should be silo or blackbox. It should be supporting all your different fund-raising methods on you will fund, for instance, when you’re meeting a planned e-giving prospect, certainly you want to know ahead of time whether they participate in the annual fund and if they have been giving annually, you want to thank them and if it’s appropriate asked them for an increased gift to the annual fund if they’re not participating annually. It’s appropriate to ask why? Maybe there’s objections that you can help to overcome and and find a new annual donor that’s one that’s one way of helping the annual fund corporate support, maybe corporate sponsorship if you know in advance or you learn in the meeting, that person works for a company asking about the possibility of corporate sponsorship. Not that they would be the decision maker, but maybe they’ll make the introduction to who the decision maker is and that entree is always valuable now than being strictly a cold call to that office. So there are lots of ways that plan giving khun support other types of fund-raising i’ve got more ideas on my block. The post is called planned e-giving is part of your fund-raising team and that’s at tony martignetti dot com and that is tony’s take two for friday, the twenty ninth of march, the thirteenth show of the year. Where did march go before we bring scott on? I want to send more live listener love we’ve got guangzhou, china and nokia, finland and porta vallarta, mexico. Now, if i can figure out if we can identify those cities, how come it’s united kingdom? Why is that? We don’t even know the country and uk? Yeah, you well show you irish english, we don’t know what i’m going to say you’re you’re welsh because that’s the least likely so welcome from wales and if you’re not in wales, why is your what is your identity, your location being masked? We don’t want your street address, but certainly country would be nice, scott koegler welcome, i’m doing terrific, scott koegler we know him he’s, the editor of non-profit technology news, which you’ll find it and p tech news, dot com he’s, our regular tech contributor, and this month we’re talking about content marketing what do we mean? Marketing? Yeah, what do we mean by this? You know, i actually for a different name for that, i call it authority marketing because it’s really, you know, you’re trying to, uh, trying to put for information about things that you know about your so you’re asserting your authority and you’re letting the people that you talk to, hopefully that read, whatever it is you’re doing, i know that you are authoritative on then the short part of that is that you’re not really selling, although, you know, being an authority and something means that hopefully people will come to you when they need answers and when they need services and products, i see that that’s what we’re talking about, okay, authority marking is a little more more descriptive and and what would a, uh, what types of things would non-profit want to be demonstrating authority in? Well, you know, the short answer there is the things that the non-profit is about so the cause the methodologies they’re using again any anything that they that they know about so that’s kind of across the board for non-profits and also for-profit type organizations. But non-profits can talk about just all the things that they do. So it’s, you know, it’s putting forth your message in a non marketing kind of away. Okay, so you and i have talked in the past about surveying people to find out what their interests are. There might be value in doing that to find out what about your work or related to your work interests them? Sure, sure. You know, you always want to get feedback from your constituents. And sometimes you get feedback from from a survey. That’s that’s a very good way to go. You know that your percentage of respondents varies all over the place. You know, i’ve had i’ve had anywhere from one percent. Twenty percent response rate course, twenty percent is great. But it’s it’s tough to achieve. Yeah, has to be something very, very interesting to them. And you might heat, you know, so that maybe a second or third generation of your of your survey, you know, kind of homes in on those issues now, but you know, another way to get feedback on what’s interesting is to get feedback on as comments on articles that you post in a block and those you generally get significantly less percentage, but those are typically more insightful. They’re more direct, you know, you know that they’re interested in that particular topic because, well, they read the article on they’re responding to it. So it’s very good way to get get responses. Now you have an article at n p tech news dot com, which says that only we have a number of articles, of course, a couple you do, but this one specifically says that sixty nine percent of non-profits are not blogging. Yeah isn’t in that stunning in this age of every you know, every schoolkid has a blogger and, you know, uh, it’s tough to imagine that, you know, almost, uh, almost three quarters, certainly two thirds of non-profits are not putting out a block, so, you know, i won’t say shame on them, but shame on well and our listeners are consistent with that. One of the poll questions i ask before the show is is your non-profit blogging at least. Twice a month that’s not even very common, but i made it a low threshold twice a month and seventy one percent said no interest. Only fourteen percent said yes, the other fourteen percent they didn’t know. So this is very consistent, actually with with what your article is just within a couple of points dahna way believe that the block is a good place for all this content. How do you do get started with your block? If you’re in that sixty nine or seventy one percent is not doing it. I will say that it’s not surprising that the number is so high because even though the technology for putting together a blogger is really easy and really available and even free and i’ll talk about the specifics in just seconds, the time to do the blog’s is a very scarce commodity. You no way talk about operations and and events and all the things that have to go into a non-profit and there are a couple of things that are critical to writing a block one is the time to write the second thing is the ability to write, you know, cogent phrases and just, you know makes things that are right, things that are interesting on getting somebody to actually be consistent. So those three things are, you know, probably the killer’s toe actually producing a block on a consistent basis. So that’s one thing that’s this very difficult, overcome and that’s why a lot of organizations or maybe something not as many as we might think, actually hyre out there blogging, and they get professional writers or managers to produce content for them and manage the the website, the block, whatever it’s called and send for them, you could try soliciting content from your constituents could, whether they’re the people benefiting from your work. Or maybe if you’re a bigger organization, maybe some of your employees can contribute. I don’t have to be writing right could be video absolutely there’s all kinds of different blogging tools now one of them and we’ll just kind a segway into this. Yeah, you know what? We talked earlier about pinterest that was a couple months ago on dh pinterest, you know, i mean it’s really a blocking platform, but it is a way to put out dahna typically images or videos of of information that’s of interest to the organization and to the constituents. Another one that you well, let’s, step on pinterest, pinterest is not all that time consuming. Because you can be. You can upload your own content, but you can also be out on the web. You find something that’s interesting, relevant to your work. You you just pin it to a board using the earl. Great it’s it’s. Very quick and easy. The good thing about it is that it it keeps it can keep a consistent exposure. Uh, that if there’s a negative, i would say that it’s it really is not generally original content. It’s something that you you found and shared, right? Right. But it’s it’s bad, but it’s not really blogging, right? No. Right. But it’s jemaine to your work. And could be interesting to your constituents who are interested in the work that you do, right. And what you just said there is, you know, being interesting to constituents. That’s really the key to any of these you’re you’re content curator of of content, and you become an authority, hopefully within your within your sphere, right? I think, you know, tend to touch on that authority issue if you’re if you’re pinning some content that’s not your own, uh, that maybe, you know, kind of the reverse of becoming the authority. Okay, you’re a curator and that’s a good thing. So you’re bringing things of interest, but you haven’t really added to the authorities factor. So somebody who’s actually interested in what you pinned is just going to click on that pin and jump to the site. That weird originated, so i’d be careful of their, you know, but it is a place to get exposure. All right? Let’s, talk about the block you had. You have some suggestions about getting started with blogging? Yeah. One of them you talked about was was tumbler and tumbler is, i guess, it’s a version of interest and that it’s, highly visual. Um, but you actually can post content there. You can also curate it and post. So on it’s a free it’s, a free resource. You could just create a account you can upload pictures of your events. You can upload text about whatever it is that you’re doing. So so that’s. Ah, relatively easy way to get in. It’s, it’s, inexpensive and fur and supposes cheap on dh free i think? Yeah. Okay. And that’s t u m b l r write the word tumbler without the okay. Okay, so, yeah, i would suggest that maybe uneasy. Wait for an organisation to get in where there really isn’t any there’s. No overhead. It’s, quick and easy, todo. Now, wordpress is very popular, but that’s that’s maura, traditional type written blogged, right. Uh, correct. Right. Word press is probably the white, most rightly used blogging platform, although there are plenty of others but that that could be for you can actually do a you can set up your own wordpress block account by going tio it’s. Um, we’re press dot com, actually. And you could get the free option and start with that. And so you can set that up and you can actually just start to write articles. You can write the articles right within wordpress and just click save and it’s published so it’s very, very simple todo right there there are elaborate wordpress blog’s but you don’t have to shoot me not to start. You certainly shouldn’t start there. You start seeing i would say start with just the three one and go from there add content had pictures. If you have videos, you could do, those two do. Although the free site has restrictions on, you know how much you can actually upload and save to the site. Okay, we’re going to take a break, and when we come back, we’ll talk a little about maybe creating cem video, that’s, that’s, simple to do, because that could be compelling authority marketing. Now i’ve had to change. The name of the segment accommodates got from content marketing now already marketing that’s. Ok, i’m flexible, you flexible, dammit! All right, we could take a break. You stay with us, scott will, and i hope you do, too. Dafs you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Buy-in have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. 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All right, scott koegler let’s, talk a little about video because video, you know, you and i have talked about this before, it doesn’t have to be high production phones that take shoot video are so common you could arm your employees or your other constituents with the phone, maybe at an event or maybe just on their own. This could be good authority, content authority, marketing, absolutely. And it’s uh, sometimes actually, most of the time, it turns out to be very current because the videos, as you just mentioned a lot of time, shot with their with their cellular cell phones with their smartphones, and we’re even just any kind of digital camera now takes video. Uh, of course, the smartphones. You, khun, take the video posted almost live on, you know, the face of people like to see themselves and people that they know so particularly had events. I saw one organization that recently kind of they turned around the old thing about putting the the, you know, the throwaway camera on the table? Yeah. And they put a card on the table that says, use your cell phone, uh, shoot a video and uploaded here, and they got i think they were just overwhelmed. They think they’ve got a couple of hundred up loads. So, you know, that’s good and bad, right? How do you use and select the ones that you wanted? But it did. It proved the point that it was a very popular option and something that people would engage with immediately. So just kind of take that idea further. What do you do with that? Um, you can either download those those videos and create a kind of a montage using your own software, or you don’t have to do that. You can actually use tools within youtube to, uh to mash up your videos on create, you know, kind of an overview doesn’t have to be ah long or complex or even, you know, two super high quality just paste a bunch of pieces together, right? You to diligently, of course, youtube has editing editing tools right now. There’s a sight that we know one listener maria simple likes because we know maria because she’s, a regular contributor and you talked about this site almost a year ago on a moto for video. Exactly an emoto is great. Um and, uh, i mean, what it does is it allows you to use both video and still images and create a you know, we’ll call it a video, and it actually is a video. Even if you have images there, uh, there’s basically photos, and it does very complex transitions. You can overlay text on it. You can overlay background music on becomes very engaging. So, you know, in a matter of probably ten minutes, you can produce one of these things. Yeah. Maria maria has been using it for a non-profit that she volunteers with, but she heard about it from you first. And like i said now, it’s been close to a year she’s using it all right? And we’re just, you know, a free tool that’s simple to use and, you know, sort of quick and dirty video that can be can be moving or informative, right, exactly an authoritative and that, again, just the good kind of go back to that word that’s really, what we’re trying to do here is to increase the believability that you’re just you’re not just somebody out there trying to raise a few bucks for, for who knows what you know, but you are actually an organization. You have a purpose, you know what you’re talking about, and it gives the people that you’re communicating with something teo grab onto teo to associate with and maybe even to, you know, get it personally and personal involvement with well, there you go, that’s that’s what this is all that we were trying to engage, we’re trying to have a connection, a dialogue so that you become affiliated with the work well aware of the work and then hopefully become affiliated with the organization, maybe as a volunteer, maybe as a donor, maybe just as a spokesperson and an advocate on the web right? Absolutely. And you know right back to the blogging section. And you mentioned, you know, get some of your constituents, your volunteers, whatever to to contribute content. If you have a relatively large organisation, you have a much better chance of getting, you know, five or ten individuals who are able to contribute something. If you could get them each to contribute something every two months, even you’d have a you have something to become consistent with. Consistency is one of those things that really counts. Okay, on dh there’s, your there’s, your sort of army of advocates and and volunteers. I mean, you may never make that. You may never meet the people, but if they’re contributing content once in a while, they’re supporting your work. Exactly. Exactly. We did have a correction for you, scott. The forward press sight is its wordpress dot or ge. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Well, i got sign up. Dot wordpress, dot com uh, so if you want to go directly to the sign up, but you’re right, wordpress dot or ge is where you go first. I am sorry. Okay? That’s okay. Okay. No, no, no. All right, but sign up. Dot wordpress dot com. But if you want to go directly toward press and learn more about it, that would be wordpress dot org’s. Okay, now you what? You’re trying to be an authority buy-in and i really messed up well, but i want to help you. It’s xero there only nine thousand dollars will do good. Only nine thousand people listening. Well, no. Nobody listens to this show. So it’s not gonna matter. It doesn’t matter what you say. Any closing thoughts you want to leave people with in their authority? Marketing? Um, i would say it’s it’s something that really people are hungry for, even though there’s plenty to read on the web. Uh, you know, the old thing, you know, you can’t publish anything. It is untrue. It’s untrue. On the web, right? Yeah, of course. But i would say just along with that, if you if you plan to go into this one of your main goals, should be to be consistent and to do it on an ongoing basis, you know, putting up one post every three months just is not really gonna do anything. It’s. Probably worse than doing nothing. Scott koegler is the editor of non-profit technology news at n p tech news. Dot com and scott remind us what your twitter ideas it’s xero scott koegler course spelling koegler is not easy. So it’s seo t k o e g l e r all right, scott, thank you very much, but with this, we’ll have you back next month. Thanks doing my pleasure. Thank you. More live listener love, new york, new york, memphis, tennessee and richardson, texas live love to all of you hope you’ll be with me next week when we’ll be talking about talk between the generations. Phyllis weiss haserot is a consultant in cross generational communication. Ines boomer boss in a general i worker gen x boss and a boomer worker how about a general i fundraiser and a boomer or boomer plus donor? We’ll talk about strategies for working across the generations we’re all over the social web you can’t make a click without sparkle adoro testa, i hope i’m saying smacking your hard head backing your smacking your head hard into tony martignetti non-profit radio that’s what i’m trying to say anyway, you can’t make a click without that. Ah four square, for instance, are you? On foursquare, if you are, then let’s connect because i’d love to see where you’re eating your breakfast in your dinners. I want to know what’s coming up before the show sign up for our weekly insider email alerts on the facebook page. There was a time when i had to say facebook, dot com forward slash tony martignetti non-profit radio that was, those are my dark days in social media. Now, i just say on the facebook page, and we all presume that you know where to find that our creative producer. Yes, we do have one is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is our line producer and assistant producer is janice taylor shows social media is barbara jean, a walton of organic social media and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. I hope to be with me next week. Oh, i hope you’ll be with me next week. Talking, alternative broadcasting talking alternative dot com on friday, one to two p, m eastern. I didn’t think you could do. You’re listening to the talking alternate network. Duitz get him. Nothing. Cubine hi, i’m donna and i’m done were certified mediators, and i am a family and couples licensed therapists and author of please don’t buy me ice cream. Our show new beginnings is about helping you and your family recover financially and emotionally and start the beginning of your life. We’ll answer your questions on divorce, family court, co parenting, personal development, new relationships, blending families and more dahna and i will bring you to a place of empowerment and belief that even though marriages may end, families are forever join us every monday, starting september tenth at ten am on talking alternative dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. You’re listening to talking alternative network at www dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Oh, this is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio friday’s one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting. Are you fed up with talking points? Rhetoric everywhere you turn left or right? Spin ideology no reality, in fact, its ideology over intellect. No more it’s time. Join me, larry shop a neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven easter for the isaac tower radio in the ivory tower will discuss what’s important to you society, politics, business and family. It’s provocative talk for the realist and the skeptic who want to know what’s. Really going on? What does it mean? What can be done about it? So gain special access to the ivory tower. Listen to me. Very sharp. Your neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven new york time go to ivory tower radio dot com for details. 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082: Marc Ecko, Craig Newmark & Naomi Levine – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Marc Ecko, CEO of Ecko Enterprises

Craig Newmark, founder of Craigslist & CraigConnects

Naomi Levine, executive director of the Heyman Center for Philanthropy & Fundraising at New York University

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://mpgadv.com

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Hello and welcome to the show it’s tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host it’s friday, march ninth, twenty twelve i certainly hope very much that you were with me last week because what you would have heard was b f d board financial dilemma. What do you do for board members who can’t read your balance sheet? The authors of the board members easier than you think guide to non-profit finances answer that andy robinson and nancy wasserman explained why understanding finances is critical so boardmember is, preserve your good work and protect themselves. We helped your board achieve financial literacy this week. I’ve got three conversations all pre recorded with marc ecko, craig newmark and naomi levine first thoughts on branding and other business lessons applicable to charities from marc ecko, founder of the very consistent brand echo enterprises, then craig mark the found of craigslist and craigconnects has ideas about simple communications and knowing when to stop talking. I interviewed mark and craig at the next-gen charity conference last year, and we closed with naomi levine, executive director of the heimans center for philanthropy and fund-raising at new york university last may, at a reception for my show, she and i talked about professionalizing fund-raising and enhancing its stature. The role of trustees, government oversight, motivation for small charities and the future of the charity community. In between. Those segments, at roughly thirty two minutes into the our tony’s, take two. Something different this week of a vintage standup comedy clip from july two thousand eleven. Of me, this show is supported by g grace corporate real estate services. And i’m very grateful for their support. Right now, we take the break. And when we return conversation with marc ecko, stay with me. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set to one, two, nine six four three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom, too. One, two, nine, six, four, three, five zero two. We make people happy. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome back. Right now, i have a conversation prerecorded with marc ecko. Hope you enjoy this. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the next-gen charity conference were at the tribeca performing arts center in downtown new york city. With me now is marc ecko, founder of eco enterprises. Specifically, we’re gonna talk about some of his board leadership on ah, with ticket, a children’s home, sweat, equity, education and every loop he’s sort of a founder of each of those and is on the board. We’ll talk a little about that. And also his presentation today on how we make people feel at next-gen marc ecko, welcome. Thank you. Why don’t you tell us what the work it ah, tick of a children’s home is it’s ukraine? Yeah. Tick. The children’s home is in odessa, ukraine. It was kind of my first entree experience in tow. Philanthropy. I kind of say it’s like we did probably the first hostile takeover of an orphanage in ninety seven. There were no casualties. Not that i know of. And certainly not the orphans of the kids. But maybe some of the prior funders o k could be for the good. Yeah. It was in the end, it netted out really well. But that was my first kind of deep touch experience. Where got toe apply my marketing sensibility. Ah, kind of operational sensibility to things on a not-for-profits sector. Um, and i got the kind of i r r if you will, the return on investment emotionally of being able to see what the dollars were doing on the ground and the touch and feel with, like the kids that that provoked me tow want to come home and you have something that was ah, you know that i could have more of ah, instant feedback loop on ah, as getting to odessa the frequency of that it was quite hard. And i still i obviously go, you know quite frequently, but the operators really on the ground, they’re the ones that are on the day today. So i, ah, started investigate the education sector, um managed to become a boardmember of ah, big picture learning, which is an alternative high school program. Alternate high schools all around the country. Great operators of, i think, one of the best reimagined high school program in the country. And i won that i don’t think it’s enough credit for it. Ah, but that provoked me to launch sweat, equity, education and sweat equity. Education is ah, and its core design. Ah, curriculum development programme where i was taking the access that i had in in the consumer product industry and kind of making it open source to the eu space. So how do you teach kids to the open hyre versus teaching them to the test? What did that look like like, for instance, could ah, ah, young kid in high school, high school age really was our core focus of cohort. Um what? What is that? They need to know to be a footwear designer in our industry. And what are the information management tools? And how would you measure success? And, you know, not stuff that you would abstractly touch, but, you know, practically touch. So it was kind of, you know, one part reimagining vocational education and another part just kind of increasing the relevance meter on considering products on dh tying that to jobs directly to job. They’re designer, et cetera. Yeah. For where watches fission products, you know, as a consumer product guy, um, that was always the coolest parts of my learning. And then my continued learning in life is that when you idea it’s something you have that you germany an idea, the idea comes back, you know, typically in the way of package or a box. And because that idea’s a sample and the samples all wrong and problem solving to get it right, where were you wrong? And where was the, you know, on the manufacturing side? Wrong. And how do you manage that information loop? And how do you home that? What kind of efficiencies can you get it learned from that so kind of, like, really demystifying my industry? Ah, inside of a curriculum product. So let’s, talk about some of your your board service because you want to tie your work to the to the audience and maybe their relationship with board members. Um what? What do you see? The shortcomings that you have become aware of in the in the way that the the executive director’s or, you know, administrators of the of the non-profits you’re on in the way they relate to our use, their board members. What advice do you have around that? Well, i think today you know, i think the next generation of charity is is ah, is to not think of yourself like a charity. You know, my great experience around sweat equity education was moving from who was, you know, an organization that was run by an executive director kind of classic form e d um, slightly academic. Ah, really good person. Ah, really, really, really good person. But the orientation was an operational. The orientation was muchmore kind of entrenched in the kind of the kind of seeing the world this flat from an operational point let’s talk about let’s talk about having developing this operational perspective. Just have a few minutes that that partly that part laid into me reset, restructuring the organization so that we had a c o o and we’ve reconfigured the organization to get someone out of business to kind of come in. And ah ah, operationalize and bill deficiencies in the organization was a big that’s, a big learning experience for me and one that i think has been ah, very fruit phone is informed. Ah, you know, other boards that i sit on in the non-profits check on dh. How have donors reacted to that at the organising some donors it’s interesting, you know, i’m someone i’m completely self made, so i take every dollar that i spend very seriously. Ah, i don’t have build gates money, but i certainly i think, for the percentage of my net worth and how much i’ve given up from work-life pay over the last decade has been it’s ah it’s been significant, so i take my spends very seriously, and i think there’s some donors to the orientation might be on the foundation side where they’re not necessarily personally stroking the check i mean personally, but rather from a foundation. So they’re an executive at a foundation or from high net worth individuals who, you know, it’s it’s kind of like a loss leader for them. So some folks have ah, don’t like that kind of business orientation, they get threatened by it. They kind of are nostalgic for a certain structure and modeling, which was that that model is coming out of date exactly. And so those are not donors that are relevant to my efforts. Yeah. Ah, and i try to get with like minded folks folks that want to try to ah, build efficiencies and ah! And build ah, you know, i don’t want to say the b word because it sounds maybe a little bit ah, and pathetic a latto being in the philanthropic space, but building the business of charity. Yeah, okay, now. And it takes a certain kind of rigor that we could extrapolated from operating business is to make them run more efficiently if they’re going to be small, medium size. We have just about a minute or so left before i know, i know you have to go and but while you were on stage, you made a point of talking about how how we make people feel. Yeah, and i was thinking of does i was listening to you. I was listening, i was think about donors how we make donors feel about they’re they’re giving, but can you share what, some what you shared on stage? Yeah, you know, i just i i’m a big believer that’s not what you make in life. It’s, it’s. You know, tell you make people feel i think, when when you die that’s what people? Remember, you know, it’s the that’s, the magic and building kind of real authentic connections between peoples i think putting an emphasis on the touch in the field and the and the and the kind of emotional stickiness because that’s what drives and motivates people to kind of want to show up the next day and the next day, you know, ah, brand is really nothing but ah, a fancy way of kind of saying, ah, you know, i’m going to build the the easiest solution to get people to understand my values if they are those folks are my consumers or people that work for me or people that don’t know me, like, within an instance, you know, it’s kind of a little bit like in this maybe a little bit, maybe egomaniacal, but a little bit like believing that you are building a religion and ah, you know, when you think about what steve jobs or walt disney did in terms of the religion of their brands, it’s very easy to become indoctrinated so like a fair manager, and if they operate in the name of apple on the ground, you don’t need jobs in the room to kind of channel that energy and that’s what great brands do good, they kind of informal culture oh! And they inform culture of leadership, clarity of message concensus. Ah, and ah, you know that that in order to build those often in the non-profits back sector, the ones that do get over that hump, they manage to do that are the ones typically have a much larger scale. It’s very hard to do that without kind of the powder to take it, you know, to scale. So, for instance, let’s say a united way is a very effective, you know, um, you know, uh, organization terms of building its brand saved the children. Okay? Ah, well known, but even a smaller organization, i could still have this kind of effective leadership. And, uh oh, there’s, no doubt sharing of culture. And now you there’s no doubt, there’s no doubt, i think it’s but, you know, it’s kind of just pierced its appear like it’s a numbers game, right? Like, the more it’s, hard to scale, a brand that no one knows, like, you know, kleenex, right? But you don’t know, like, you know me nick’s, right? Like, if i said, oh, i used me next you’d be like what? You don’t mean so there’s ah, you know ah. What? I think it could be said for that and i think an an an anecdote for folks in the non-profit space. They need to go around and find other like minded organizations and, you know, should i see this all the time you just came from aa? You know, big summit and ah, get out the vote groups like all around the country and from the rock, the vote, folks toa much smaller kind of local regionalized groups that are more maybe focus around a demographic or a region of the country. But you know anything that they could share and create a kind of an umbrella around to kind of create that scale. Right? I often say to two non-profits to check their charities at the door, check their brand rather at the door. And one of the great ways for them to grow is to find like minded organizations that are willing to kind of operate under the same name. Ah ah ah, if you find, you know it’s kind of odd to me that, you know, i just came from a two day summit where i met someone on the west coast that’s trying to do is get out the vote, play with a digital platform and then someone on the east coast trying to do it to get out the vote play with a digital platform it’s kind of like, aren’t you? Isn’t there some burr dunaj run done and sees here? So even if you like used, we could probably take make-a-wish you guys operate on the same basic digital, like the digital tools, and you guys could re label like white, label them or or be powered by your brand? But how do you build those efficiencies when you’re operating in-kind of small silos and very fragmented co-branded helps give cover and, you know, often the you know, there’s, there is strength in numbers and strength in that kind of alignment of missions, so ah, i feel like that’s. What? Ah ah lot of its one of the achilles heels of the of the non for-profit sector marketa, whose founder echo enterprises. He has just a short time. So we have to wrap. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the next-gen charity conference. Coming to you from tribeca performing arts center, lower manhattan. Mark. Thank you very much. My pleasure. Thank you, thanks for saving. Thanks. They didn’t think the tubing getting demanding things. You’re listening to the talking, alternate network, waiting to get me to thinking. Cubine are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam lebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Hi, this is psychic medium. Betsy cohen, host of the show. The power of intuition. Join me at talking alternative dot com mondays at eleven a. M call in for a free psychic readings. Learn how to tune into your intuition, to feel better and to create your optimum life. I’m here to guide you and to assist you in creating life that you deserve. Listen every monday at eleven a, m on talking alternative dot com. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed hi and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. No. Welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent right now, i have my interview with craig newmark, the founder of craigslist and craigconnects from also neck from nextgencharity conference last year hears that. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the next-gen charity conference two thousand eleven at the tribeca performing arts center in downtown manhattan, and joining me now is craig newmark. Craig is the founder of craigslist and craigconnects greg, thank you for taking time today. Hey, i’m glad to be here. It’s a pleasure to have you craigconnects is ah fairly new venture but you and i talked about it on the show maybe six months or so ago. How has it been evolving? It’s been working out pretty well on a personal basis. It’s help me focus what i want to do in the sense of what causes i should be supporting what group size should be supporting in support of those causes, that kind of thing. It’s helping me better understand how tow really do an exceptional job of supporting some specific non-profits also finding ways for non-profits tto help themselves with the eventual aim of getting very large numbers. Of people connected to social media. All right. And so what have you been learning from the personal perspective in terms of how you should be or how craigconnects should be supporting non-profits well, there’s a bunch of small lessons, okay, one of the one of the most difficult is haven’t finding ways quiet ways to get people in the same space non-profits in the same space to actually talk with and work with each other collapse been a tough one. I’ve also ah realized in a deep way how difficult it is often for small, effective non-profits to be really bad getting the word out about themselves, since often they don’t know how to deliver a good, tight elevator pitch and that’s a bit of a computer industry cliche. Nevertheless, they need to be able to talk about themselves and real quick and tight. So how is craigconnects helping with the collaboration and also helping non-profits deliver their own message? Well, in those specific examples, it’s mostly me speaking directly across people in different groups in terms of what they’re doing, i’ve devoted most of that energy to groups which support military families and veterans um, but very recently and i really mean, last couple days i’ve been starting to devote that now intensely two groups who believe in the future of journalism and that one way to restore trust to news media is to start checking the facts again. S o u mean investigative journalism investigative journalist plays a role, but the idea is that often a politician, for example, will make a statement to a reporter. The reporter will know that he’s being lied to and the reporter should have within relatively easy reach. Someone is check the facts, and it can then challenge the politician is needed um, and in terms of ah non-profits supporting themselves are really helping themselves to convey their own message. Doesn’t that still have to be an elevator pitch, but conveying, ah, cohesive mathos message? What is your advice there? Where you see shortcomings? Well, basically, the idea is that a speaker on behalf of a non-profit or pretty much any organization just has to clearly identify what they’re doing and just try to get it out there in about forty five seconds and then keep repeating until they can do that if they don’t know how to, they need to. Ask someone for help in terms of that craigslist foundation, in fact, does teach that and it’s a boot camp, but that’s only available maybe once or more year. The idea is it’s a matter of applied common sense if you’re doing something and if you’re good at it, you just have to be able to boil it down and to articulate the gist of it really fast. And then no one to stop talking. Yeah, okay, that i was gonna ask you something else. But now that you just said, you know, when to stop talking overselling can be a problem. Yes, it’s quite possible that i’ve just spoken with some folks who had a difficulty knowing when to stop difficulty. No england tio? No, when they were over selling something. Okay. And so how do we, uh, do you have any advice about knowing when to stop or should we be practicing this in front of others? How do we stop? People? I’d say practice in front of people who will be slightly unkind. You okay? Because you need friends who are good enough friends to let you know what you may not want to hear. Yeah, don’t. We learn a lot when we’re challenged when, when we’re told, you know, that’s not quite right sometimes the only way you learn is from people who like you enough, teo tell you, when you’ve gone a little too far, that applies, not lucas speaking, but in my case, my sense of humor. Okay, i won’t ask you to try it out, but but no, but it’s it’s absolutely true, we do learn when we’re when we’re challenged on dh challenge in a good way. Yeah, no so craigconnects is focused mostly on aid for military families you mentioned there. There are other categories of not sure all right craigconnects is working more than one, any one particular area with military families and veterans, but there’s also areas like water and sanitation, micro finance, peace in the mideast. One big area just beginning to be explored is ah helping out those groups which measure the effectiveness of non-profits because there’s a lot of non-profits who do a lot of good but there’s also a substantial number of non-profits hoo ah, tell a good story, but never really get anything done. No outcomes. Another area is this whole idea of restoring trust to the news to news media by restoring fact checking i mean, i’m not in that business and i’m not going to tell him how to do their job, but i want news i can trust again. One area unannounced on the site is voter protection. There are people actively seeking to disenfranchise various groups, young old latinos and other minorities. We’re in america and the effort to to disenfranchise people needs to be stopped. You mentioned the sights or the organizations that evaluate charities or rate charities that’s the guide star helping groups like guidestar, charity navigator is that is that the population that’s exactly right? Guidestar in charity navigator have been around a long time. They’re good at looking at financial effectiveness. They’re moving towards measures of accountability, transparency and then eventually measuring just how good a charity is that serving his client population. I’ve had ken burger on the show ceo charity navigator, and we’ve talked about jerry navigator two point oh, and then what’s coming in three point of the outcomes assessment that’s the deal now for the here and now there’s something called great non-profits stud organ that’s user reviews for non-profits kind of like what yelp does that’s a hero now, and i really do encourage people to look at it and then to write in their own little reviews of non-profits they know something about for charity’s listening if they would like tio if they feel they fall within the missions that craigconnects is working with, how do they go about getting getting the your attention? Well, if you go to craigconnects that or ge there’s a connect link and that’s how to submit something, we need a little bit of a break because we’ve been successful enough to get to be overwhelmed with requests, okay? And let me just ah, closing moment ask you generally what? What what are you planning to share this afternoon with the with the next-gen audience? Basically common sense stuff? They’ve asked me to talk about things i’ve learned doing craigslist in craigconnects that maid apply to people in general, like the craigslist business model ultimately is doing well by doing good in meant that when making it a new company, i decided to step away from a very large amounts of money, not altruistic. Itjust means following through his stuff i already believed in and another founding principle. I think craig was just simplicity, just a little about that. Well, yeah, insights, orn presentation or anything, people don’t really need the fancy stuff, they need something which is simple and fast, all right. Craig newmark is the founder of craigslist and craigconnects craig you very much for being a guest. Thanks, mom. My pleasure, then mar. Pleasure having you. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the next-gen two thousand eleven conference at tribeca performing arts center in new york city. I want to thank craig, mark very much for sitting for an interview and also market go. Right now, we take a break when we returned tony’s, take to a clip from my standup vintage clip from my stand up stay with me. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed hi and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com dafs welcome back, it’s. Time for tony’s, take two. I’ve been doing stand up comedy since july two thousand eleven. Here is a vintage clip from july two thousand eleven. I did this set at gotham comedy club in new york city. Here it is, durney. When i was in seventh green, i had a terrific krauz lisa magic and i chose the moment to ask her to go steady. To be our seventh grade dance. I can still smell that high gloss varnish on the gymnasium floor. I was there in my powder blue leisure suit. The contrast ing thread on the lapel. I saved my last dance released. Lisa saved her last dance for albert moran. The pain of watching that spectacle when they parted buy-in walked up to lisa. I got close to her mind, hands were sweating, my chest pounding. I got so close, i put my hands on her shoulders in the middle of the dance floor, and i asked, monisha would you go steady? With all her seventh grade charm and sweetness, she said, you are standing on my dress. Years later, albert and lisa, man. Then, sadly, they separated and divorced. Dahna attorney. And i handled that divorce. Handup lisa has been paying the press waiting that is tony’s take two for friday, march ninth, two thousand twelve, the tenth show of two thousand twelve. There is more of that exact that clip mohr that set, i should say on my blogged at tony martignetti dot com right now i have my interview with naomi levin she’s, the executive director of the heimans center for philanthropy and fund-raising at new york university from last may at a reception that i hosted for my show here is that interview. Naomi levine is the executive director of the george h heimans junior center for philanthropy and fund-raising at new york university. For twenty two years, she was in use, senior vice president for external affairs and helped raise over two and a half billion dollars for the university. She is a graduate of columbia law school. She was previously the national executive director of the american jewish congress. Now she is special advisor to the president of venue, and she chairs the board of the edgar bronfman center for jewish student life and the tab center for israel studies. Please join me in welcoming mrs naomi levine. Mrs levine, what do you see as the non-profit role for our society? Let me put this in a kind of perspective that i always used. I don’t think that most people in our society recognized the importance of the non-profit world in our civil society, if you close your eyes for one minute and look at the skyline of new york city, do you hear me? Yeah, you will see that if you took away lincoln center, the hospitals and why you, fordham, columbia and all of the other universities, medical centers, cultural centers, theatres, dance a group, you will see that this would be a very different society, and most people really don’t think about that when they think of the way we all run. They think a government, they think of the corporate sector, and they don’t think of the non-profits but why is that? That that means non-profits are not fulfilling their work in spreading their the message of their good works? I mean, do you think the blame falls on the non-profits for people not being aware, i think i would suspect so let me lead into that as we progress in our conversation because the truth is, i’m not really sure i know that most people don’t realize it and what they don’t realise moore is not one of those organizations could exist without fund-raising they require financial support, and yet do you know a shingle mother who will say to their child, you know, dear, when you grow up, i want you to be a fundraiser. Nobody says that my own mother, my own mother in the last years of her life, when she was living at a place called cat a house in the bronx, i would come to visit her and she’d say to me now remember, when we go down for lunk, if someone asks you what you do for a living, tell them you’re a lawyer, not a fundraiser. She was embarrassed at her law review daughter was raising money. People think of it as selling cookies for the girl scouts, and you ask me why it is that i must tell you i’m not sure, but one thing i am sure if you let me adjustment, just put that on the table is that unless fund-raising is viewed as a profession, a legitimate profession that has talked within? The university not with in all kinds of organizations that provide courses, but within the university, it never will be given the kind of status that it deserves. Dentistry at one point was nothing. You went to an apprentice, yet you learnt how to pull a tooth. That was the end. Lawyers like john adams of your read his book. You know, he was an apprentice in a law office. But once causes were given within universities and got to stamp a university academic approval, they became professions. And the reason i created the heimans center is that i really want to see people take cautious, learn and make this area a profession that even my mother would be proud of you so that’s, hard to go. Let me tell you and you make a very good point that i don’t know any fundraisers who it’s. For whom? It’s. The first career. You know, in my office we had a big staff and we had people who were from every discipline around. They were from journalism, from archaeology, from everything in the world. Nobody studied. And yet if you think about it, i know that i learned an enormous amount. During those twenty five years and every time i prepare for a class, i learned more, i confess to you, i never spent time with my staff talking about ethics. What did we talk about? We talked about what you go, how much money where’s the money, etcetera. Yet when i started to prepare the course on ethics and red doug white’s book on charities on trial and a few other things, i said, you know, that’s, a very important area, and i should learn about it because if you don’t know the law and you don’t know the ethical component and you don’t know board governance and fiduciary relationship, you’re going to get in trouble. That’s perfect and doug white was a guest on my show, talking about his book about ethics, but so now we’re talking about the fundraiser and fund raisers, and you’ve just made a great transition. How about the role of the trustees? What? What are they trustees heir not really fully aware of their roles, don’t you think with respect to the organization, trustees are also fund-raising is if you sit on a board because it’s a nice, prestigious thing to do and it looks good in your obituary in the times it is a wrong reason to be on a board boards have responsibility. They have the responsibility to keep their organization financially secure. That means boardmember sze have to be fundraisers also, you know, larry tisch usedto have he was the chairman of gnu during the time that i was vice president and he had a very simple and crash way. I assume of running his board. He used to say to me, look, we’re not harvey, we’re not princeton. When i put someone on the board, they not only have to be dedicated, decent people committed toe hyre read, but they have tai run my board by the three g’s that people have to give money, they’re not a big amount, but give something to show their commitment to. They have to help get money, and if they can’t do that, they should get off the board because boards have responsibilities. And when you talk about a boardmember they have to be, they have to understand their responsibilities, fiduciary, legal, come to meeting, to read and order to report. Read a budget report there are a whole list of things if this was a class that i could list for you that boards have to do so. The relationship between the fundraiser and a boardmember is really a very close one. What was number three? You said he had three, three, three requirements, money get money there, you get off the moca or get off the board. That was number three, not in a harsh way. I’m not suggesting you tell your boards that i’m telling you you have to try to persuade them to give and then had people onto your board that will shut an example. I never suggested it toe fund-raising they come in and get rid of their boardmember you’ll be in trouble. On the other hand, you have tohave board training on the sarbanes. Actually, the corporation board have been instructed to do that to a close are instructed to give board training, training aboard and what their responsibilities are. Doug and i and and ruth ellen reuben is here. We go around to different boards were invited to talk to them about their obligations under the law federal law state law i venture to say if i went around this room today and most of your fundraisers air sit on board, you would not know a ll the laws that are involved in fund-raising state and federal. I learned that on lee when i started to teach i did not know that when i was raising money. Don’t you think that the trend also is that this is only gonna get worse at the booth state and federal level? That oversight from those levels of government is going to just increase among among non-profits i don’t like the fact that you used the word worse in my book, i would say that’s better, more, more. I know you advocate for even greater oversight. I know you do far more oversight and far more regulation. It is an area that everybody thinks so. We don’t have to regulate the non-cash offiicial very good people. The red crossed of good things university how dare we suggest that they be regulated more. Let me tell you that there is a cz much mismanagement, excessive salaries, all kinds of conflict of interest area occur in the nonprofit world that a car in a profit within the nonprofit sector fights your advocacy of deeper oversight. The non-profit schecter buy-in it’s. Not eager tohave. More regulation. I will confess to you on my staff and friends know this for seven years i have gone up to albany fighting for one lousy bill. One bill that would say that if you’re hired as a professional fundraiser, you should take one course in the a clutch of your entire career in law, ethics and board governance. I think you should do that. And every year it gets through the senate and assembly up in albany and then the non-profits come up and they argue against it in their mind. It’s a slippery slope. You’re going to start regulating your going to stock with more rules. We don’t want that. And the governors who don’t want to start up with such good organizations as the heart association of the red cross, they vito and it drives me insane. Ken berger is going to be a guest on my show in in july. I think. It’s the july first show, the executive director of charity navigator what do you see is the role of charity navigator and similar rankings ratings of charities. Well, i think that anything that helps a donor get on understanding of an organisation is a good thing i’m not in a position to discuss the details of those organization, but i know if their organizations around that help it donor-centric stay and more about the organization in my book that’s fine, more disclosure, more honesty, more open dealings, more accountability, all those words and now on the table when i started in fund-raising i’m a very old person, i’m eighty eight years, so i have lived through different parts and different segments off fund-raising the fund-raising world, and in the beginning, you never heard such words. I never heard such words, but now you hear it more amore schnoll organizations like that play a role onda, of course, it’s controversial because the role that they play helps define what people decide to look at. And of course, donors now are more interested in looking at outcomes, and that becomes very difficult latto measure donors are also interested in, um, percentage of budget that goes to program versus administration, but for some charities, it could be very legitimate toe have a very high percentage going to administration because they’re doing things in, but if they’re going abroad and doing things on the ground in, you know, in other continents, i have always been very conservative. I believe that when a person gives money, not more than thirty five percent maximum should go for overhead and a russian gulf of the program. Now there may be exceptions, and you may be right, but by and large, i think that people should feel comfortable in knowing that the book of their money goes to the project that they want to support. Now there are exceptions, and i think that when you sit down with the donor, like we used to have to sit down with someone who gave us two million dollars for a chair, we had to explain that some of that would go for the over head of that school. You’ll have to be able to explain it, but we never never spent more than thirty five cents of thirty five percent that was maximum mr tisch required even less on, you’ll have to be very open and honest about that talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Hi, i’m carol ward from the body mind wellness program. Listen to my show for ideas and information to help you live a healthier life in body, mind and spirit. You hear from terrific guests who are experts in the areas of health, wellness and creativity. So join me every thursday at eleven a, m eastern standard time on talking alternative dot com professionals serving community. This is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office needs better leadership, customer service sales or maybe better writing are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes or get your human resource is in touch with us. Website is improving communications, dot com that’s improving communications, dot com improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier and make more money. Improving communications, that’s. The answer. Talking. The audience for the show is small and midsize non-profits the tagline is big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent, what would you like to leave small and midsize charities? With what message for small shops, elections? You’re not different because how you raise money for a big organization and how you raise your trish more fundamentally are not different when we teach courses in our heimans center we, my approach is at the principles of generic, and they involve developing relationships if you know your fund-raising you know that last year, out of the three hundred three billion dollars, it was raised about eighty three percent when you include request come from individuals and individuals will give to small groups, and i’ll give to big groups, so the rules on how you raise that money, the art of the ass is the same. In a little group, you use the same technique to get twenty five dollars, as you will use to get a million dollars, it is developing a relationship, knowing howto ask knowing how to devise your mission statement, knowing the process and the rules and fund-raising knowing what you’re bored should do and that should be and knowing the ethical issues, whether you’re dealing with a little group or a big road, which harder with a little good bye don’t knock it you also perhaps will you social medium or with a little girl? I’m not sure i’m no expert on social media we brought on to our staff of the heimans center last year, marcia vanik she’s, an expert, and she has tried to persuade me that things like facebook and twitter and all that stuff have some value. I am totally illiterate there, but i respect the fact that the coming generations will use it more, particularly the small organizations, and i tell the small organizations, don’t ignore your financial status. Be sure if you can’t afford an audit, at least have very strict rules and how your money is handled. Doug white’s book has a whole list of cases in which organizations big and small got into terrible trouble because they weren’t careful and how they handle their finances. And that is true in little groups as well as big rooms, and that doug white book is charity on trial and that but that goes back to the trustees relationship and trustees obligations even for us, even for a small shop there’s a board and maybe a board of only three or four people, but they have the obligation to be aware of the things that you’re talking about under the law. Whether you’re a big organization are a little charities bureau, which is the hand of the attorney general in the state of new york will look atyou and look atyou carefully and don’t make mistake. I’m not here selling doug’s book i couldn’t give any i’m not interested in that. The only reason i pointed out is that it has in it the cases that are very important for you to understand, and you have to know all the people that got in trouble. Let me give you one example, the american red cross during the nine eleven tragedy, they got in a lot of money, and they used a whole bunch of it for the purpose that nine eleven required that a little bit of money he left over the director of the red cross, one of the most terrific people in the field used that money for the blood drive. She didn’t put it in her pocket. She was fired. Why was she fired? Because the law says if i take money from you for a and i use it for b you’re wrong. I have to use that money for a unless i write to you and i say to you, do you mind if i use it, etcetera? So they’re a little things like that that if you were a fundraiser in this room or a boardmember you have to be very sensitive to whether you’re a little gay root for a big room. We have just a minute or two left. What is it that concerns you most about the charitable sector over the next couple of years? One to two years? Where? What do you think about most what keeps you up at night? Well, i think that competition is very it’s going even increase and the government are cutting back drastically. And so on the shoulders of the non-profits we have to provide for the help that the poor need the abused women or the st joseph’s, full kitchens and all the social services that keep our society going. There’s a book that somebody called claire got eonni road that has wonderful. Chapters on how capitalism could not exist in this country on regulated capitalism without the help of the non-profits we provide the helpful the people that fall between the cracks in our society, and i worry that with the government cutting back and the competition the way it is it’s going to be hard and hard and harder also europe which never was here before, is now facing the situation where their governments are cutting back. They never had a non-profit sector, they relied entirely on government support. Every university in europe is supported by the government. Oxford cambridge is so bone, everyone now oxygen has an office in new york, cambridge has an office in new york and everyone overseas we have more people in our class is now trying tto learn fund-raising from europe, asia, china, every place that’s going to give you a great deal of competition, and so i don’t spend nights worrying about it, but i am certainly concerned about it, and i would hope you find may end that i’m too old to see the end of it, but i would like to see fund-raising fundraisers given the recognition that they deserve and huge. Haven’t you in this room have that obligation to be proud of what you’re doing to make certain that when you work in any agency, people know that without you, that agency is going to close that? This is a dignified profession, and you have to carry that flag. Naomi levine is the executive director of the george heimans center junior junior center for philanthropy and fund-raising at new york university. Thank you very much, mrs loving. Do we have time for where i think you have time for maybe just one or two is your question? Go ahead. Carol weaver, please just shout it out. I’ll repeat it. Go ahead. What do you think about in-kind fundrasing coming together to create a voting we are. Your economy, i i’m told of if we bound together issues way could be a voice in already for your force, which of course, i’m very hyre and for other things, like maybe creating a bank for non-profits you know, i think it’s the variance say, when you make a finger together, you make a fist way have concerned with go ross the industry could we not consider, and i can’t think of a better well, but there are s o the question is generally about how the non-profit sector could organize to be a more cohesive voting bloc now, but their organization like independent sector, you know, so there’s that what else would you like to sell? Well, i can say is most of those organizations are run by their executives, as most organizations are in the average member plays a very minimal role in your right. If the average member played a bigger role and then insistent, i’m sure you think then you would have more effective involvement in albany and other places, but you have the organizations around there’s, a million of them it’s just said in my book there, not doing anything, uh, along the lines. And i think that should be done, yeah, does independent sector is that one of the groups that opposes broader on government oversight, so nobody should fortuny chelation hearts of then that would be, yes, doug white does, even though you panned his book, doug white support, sir, we’re gonna have dug it up for rebuttal after this. Is there another? Is there one more question? If we have time before mrs levin leaves? All right, please join me in thanking her again. Naomi living. And my thanks to naomi levin and her team at the new york university heimans center next week, it’s feared more than death, not the dentist public speaking lori krauz public speaking and presentation skills coach will help you through the fear of your next appearance in front of an audience then scott koegler, our tech contributor, will introduce us to pinterest pinterest dot com the skyrocketing social media property what’s in it for your non-profit keep up with what’s coming up sign up for are in sad or email alerts on the facebook page, like the page you can listen live our archive for i carve listening, go to non-profit radio dot net and that’s where you’ll find our itunes paige, if you are an itunes listener, if you’re if you’re getting this podcasts and subscribing, could i plead with you to goto non-profit radio dot net and leave a review there on the itunes? Paige? I know you don’t have to go backto. Listen, i know you get the podcast automatically, but if you could, i’d be grateful for a review at non-profit radio dot net the following is a public service announcement because i have a soft spot in my heart for belmar, new jersey do you need dental care? Visit the offices of hannah pole dental care in belmar on friday, march twenty third to receive free dental services. Everyone is welcome, regardless of where you’re from, care will be offered on a first come, first served basis. For information, call seven three two six eight one two two two, five that is organized by dentistry from the heart. The show is sponsored by g grace and company. Are you worried about the rising cost of rent for your organization? Do you need a plan for real estate? You’re non-profit owns g grayson company will give you and your board a full analysis. George grace has been advising non-profits on their real estate decisions for over twenty five years. He offers listeners a complimentary thirty minute consultation. G grace dot com or eight eight eight seven four seven two two three, seven our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is today’s line producer shows social media is by regina walton of organic social media and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules hope you’ll be with me. Next friday, one to two p. M eastern. Here at talking alternative dot com. I didn’t think that shooting. Good ending to do. You’re listening to the talking alternate network, itching to get to thinking. Duitz duitz you could. Looking to meet mr and mrs wright but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your current relationship as filling as possible, then tuning on thursdays at one pm for love in the afternoon with morning alison as a professional matchmaker. I’ve seen it all with distinguished authors, industry coolers and experts on everything from wine to fashion. 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