161: Nonprofit Outcomes Toolbox & Optimize Your Social Profiles – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Dr. Robert Penna, author of “The Nonprofit Outcomes Toolbox.”

Amy Sample Ward, CEO of Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN) and co-author of “Social Change Anytime Everywhere”

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, i hope you were with me last week. I’d suffer ventricular ticket. I screwed that up. I’d suffer ventricular tachycardia if it came to my attention became within my ken that you had missed the non-profit outcomes toolbox. Dr robert penna, author of the non-profit outcomes toolbox, discussed the wave of reliance on outcomes measurement and gave concrete steps and tools so that small and midsize shops khun stay ahead of the trend toward outcomes assessment. That was part one of our interview from an earlier show and news sources new source maria simple are doi n of dirt cheap and free ideas is also the prospect finder, and last week she had advice for you on which news sources are best for your research and also a new free source from the foundation center foundation directory online this week, the non-profit outcomes toolbox part do from a previous show and optimize your social profiles. Amy sample ward, our social media contributor, has tips to find tune your profiles on the social networks like twitter and facebook. While staying true to mission and brand also using your profiles to promote campaigns and amy’s sixty seconds style stop she’s, the ceo of non-profit technology network and ten and her book is social change any time everywhere got lots of guests live in the studio is going to be lots of extra special live listener love as well as everybody listening worldwide. We’ll get to that right now. We’ll get to my previous interview with dr robert penna and the non-profit outcomes toolbox, bringing robert penna welcoming him back now, we were just before the break talking about the outcome statement should be meaningful, achievable, sustainable on dh the book goes into a little more detail, even oh, and i’d like to because i’d like to help our listeners achieve an outcome statement. You say that should be bound in time and number the outcome statement. What does that mean? Well, what it basically means is rather than saying, we’re going to change the world, it’s, that we’re going to specifically a change ah, certain measurable of facet of characteristic of someone for a certain number of people within a certain given period of time, so the idea said we’re going to achieve x for why number of people within two months, three months, one year, whatever it may be so that the idea is that first off it’s it’s tethered to ah, a certain number of people that you’re going teo achieve this for, and also a certain specific times. So that, for example, the investor knows when the payoff comes, let me give you another reason why this is crucial if you were if you read the book and i know you know you did, you probably came across the work capacity ten thousand times capacity. You don’t have to read the book to hear about capacity over the building, and i don’t know, but over here, this is a very, very specific use. If you haven’t outcomes approach, it automatically begs the capacity question, because if you are clear about what it is you want to achieve from that flows what it is you need to get there, which then challenges you to say, do i have that capacity most non-profits and i hate to use generalizations, but i think in this case, it’s true, most on profits and most people who are aware of the non-profit space, when you talk about capacity building the first thing they will think about his dollar signs. All right, we’re having a pass it e capacity raising effort. What? It’s a fund raiser. True capacity, however, has three levels. All right. The first one is structural capacity. How is the organization run? How is it managed? What’s the relationship between the board and the executive leadership what’s the quality of the training of the staff, et cetera. The second is what i call functional capacity. Basically, what that means is if you go, you do have the tools to do what you say you’re going to do. If you were an education organization, then you need educators. You need a curriculum. If you’re counseling organization unique counselors and you need some sort of models, they’re all your inputs. Yes, exactly. The third one, and perhaps the most important one is the implementation capacity. The’s are the thousand and one little things that not just non-profits, but anybody trips up, trips over when it comes to actually doing a job, it could be, for example, twenty. You or i are going to put up a curtain rod and it turns out, we don’t have a level. Well, if we don’t have a level, how we’re gonna make sure the curtain rod is level that’s an implementation capacity issue when you talk about a non-profit it could be everything from the from the requirement to provide transportation so the clients could actually get there to something like intake if you want. If you’re goingto have seventy five people, let us say graduate from your program will do you have the capacity for a nen take to actually process those seventy five people? So they’re not standing on line three hours and losing interest in wandering away who’s going to answer the phones let’s say you have a a an outreach effort going on and you have a training program and you put the word out on the street. But then it turns out that your non-profit is really run all by part timers, and most of the time, if anybody calls to get information, they’re either going to get just a phone that rings or they’re going to get an answering machine. That’s a capacity questions. So if you’re doing this correctly, it really forces you to look at a number. Of things including the capacity that you have to actually achieve the goals. If you don’t have it, then you either have to upgrade the capacity nufer have scaled back the goals and flowing from this quantification of of what you want outcomes to be is measurable because they become measurable when you’ve quantified and bound in-kind time number so we can, in fact, measure things that are i have previously been so just vague sort of objectives. Let me give you a classic example on this may sound like a bit of a stretch to euro to your readers, but you and i being roughly the same age, i think you have. You have readers we have listen that’s, right, our reader listeners, because they’re all gonna buy your book, my readers, just the non-profit outcomes toolbox published by wile e you recall when when when we were kids, we had things like, you know, lincoln logs and the directors were there, and they were even wood and the logs were made for right? Okay, this is going to sound like a bit of a weird one, but compare, think back, compare when you’re building one of those things. Too. When your mother built a big cake, your mother baked the cakes you took all the ingredients she pour them in a bowl should put him in a pan, she put in the oven and she lost at that point total control of what was going on. No one’s going to know whether cake was good or bad until after it was done. It came out. It was cool when you tasted it, and if something were on, there was nothing you could do. Thinking back, however, to the example, the lincoln logs with the tinker toys, the directors that we had a guide. The guide showed a step by step where we should be at every point in time if at any point in time, what we’re building didn’t look like the picture we could stop, we could go back and we could fix it, that’s one of the differences of working with outcomes as opposed to not when you don’t work without comes we have to be the only position you’re in is to hope for a good end result, but you can’t control it because you have no idea, really what’s going on with the variables. If you’re tracking using an outcome system, all right, and it is bound in time and is bound in number, and you do know that by a certain date x number of people should be at stage four. If they’re not there, then you still have time to fix it. If you have no clue where they’re supposed to be, or what we could do was hope for good results of the end. And if you don’t get it, well, then we did. You say sorry, better luck. Next time, you don’t know that as a child actually had an easy bake oven, i didn’t have the lincoln logs. My brother had elearning logs. I had the easy bake oven. They should also be your outcome statement verifiable, and this is all really, i’m i’m breaking it down the way you do in the book, but just flows naturally from the way you’re describing it. We have to be able to verify where we are time versus goal on dh and reassess, say more about verifiability. Verifiability basically means that some third party can look at it without spending a ton of money, because again, and this is that not to take anything away from professional evaluators, but evaluation cost money and professional evaluators and professional valuation services. I mean, these people are very good at what they do, but the point is that hopefully what you’re doing is verifiable in the easier way i mean, is there’s an old saying, you know, chicken soup is good for the soul? Well, it could be, but it’s, hard to tell. You know, what you want to do is you want to stick to things that have some fairly easily discernible evidence that can be seen and that’s what it means, my verifiable it means staying away from outcomes to talkabout, as you said before, well, somebody feels better about themselves in their place in the universe? Well, that’s a little bit nebulous. And so i would recommend that if you’re looking to create a good outcome statement, a good outcome for your program that you stay away from the cosmic, the psychic, the overly emotional and definitely the extraterrestrial. Okay, so first step to create a proper outcome statement is what decide what you want to be different at the end of this program. So you’re definitely looking forward toward the end, with the end in mind begins, and you say that the book begin with the engine dart with what do you want to be different about a certain situation or a certain set of conditions as a result of your program, start there. If you can’t define it, then maybe should rethink what you’re doing and in determining that you need to be bound in number and time and those miserable those of the descriptions as you working back, which is yes, but the idea is what you wanted start with is a change you want to start with being able to define a change. We’ve kind of alluded to this, but the basic basic idea of the changes what’s called the backs measures change in the behavior, attitude, condition, knowledge or status of those you seek to serve. So you start with the change in their behavior, their attitude, that condition and knowledge or the status and it doesn’t have to be a person. It could be a forest that could be it could could be a watershed. The status goes from being threatened to not tear being safe to being protected. But the idea is you start with the change and defining if you can’t define it, then my suggestion is you start to rethink a lot of organizations. Start with the problem. And then the next question is, what do we do? Well, what do we do? That’s that’s. The wrong place to start the place to start is first off. What changes do we want to bring about? Secondly, what resource is will it take to do that? Thirdly, you know what actions or programs will it take to effectuate that it’s? A total reverse of the usual way of approaching most of these issues. That’s. Ah, sort of a summary of of developing your own outcome statement. And there’s, obviously a lot more detail. In the book again, the book is the non-profit outcomes toolbox, we have just about a minute before the break, how do we start to apply on outcomes analysis? You have a lot of tools in the book, but how do we get there? Well, first off an easy thing by the book, but beyond that, there are any number of very, very thoughtful people who have created some of these tools that are out there. The problem is that most non-profits i don’t know about them. Everybody, for example, is heard of the logic model. Well, what they don’t understand what the logic model was originally intended to do was to intended to be a supposed to the way a lot of people are suggesting it be used. Today there are alternatives to this, and the book is one way of finding out about them, and reinventing the wheel is not necessary. These wheels have already being been admitted to the question is knowing which ones work for you. And that was the whole concept behind the toolbox approach to the book that perhaps we can talk about after the break. Okay, way are going to take a break. If you’ve not heard of the logic model, then you’re with me. So i’m going to ask robert after the break to just briefly talk about that. And then we’re going to talk about some of tools and lessons you can learn from the for-profit from the corporate sector in outcomes measurement. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio stay with us. 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What can be done about it? So gain special access to the ivory tower. Listen to me. Very sharp. Your neo-sage. Tuesday nights nine to eleven new york time go to ivory tower radio dot com for details. That’s. Ivory tower radio, dot com e every time i was a great place to visit for both entertainment and education. Listening. Tuesday nights nine to eleven. It will make you smarter. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com dahna welcome back to the show. Our last segment. Let’s define the logic model because maybe i know it by a different name, robert, but you may know that what is that? That is actually the name of it, of the logic model is a away that non-profits have had for some years now of planned it’s, one of the tools that they’ve used for planning how to get to the outcomes from the starting point. But the logic model became very well known when kellogg adopted at the kellogg foundation. Same is the cereal people, the telephone, isha and united way of america adopted. And in both of those cases they kind of put the word out amongst their there either case of kellogg, that grantees, and in case of the united way of america, the local affiliates, that this was one of the earliest outcomes frameworks that you could potentially use not doing under do plug. But in my previous book, outcome frameworks, that was one of the things we talked about, because the idea was there were these various models, and how do they compare one to the other? And what were the pluses and minuses of all of them that had never been done before? Which is why i wrote that previous book, but the logic model truly was meant as a graphic illustration of cause and effect within a program that this input will lead to that which will lead to the third, which will lead to the fourth and hopefully get you two the the the the end point that you that you desire, the problem is it was never actually designed to be a management or tracking tool. And when organizations and there are a lot of people, very thoughtful people who do use it for this personally, i think it’s cumbersome and what you wind up with since the whole design was a flow chart, very often you wind up with all of these various lines at the doubling back on each other. So some of someone i know, okay, so we’re past that now that we’re in the outcomes toolbox, right? And why did you choose the toolbox metaphor? Kinds of the toolbox was very simple. Let’s go back to that curtain, rod, you and i, we’re going to put a human. You don’t go back to my eagle scout. No, no, i’m still sinjin. I’m going to go back. To the curtain rod, you’re not going to put up a few minutes ago without the level. Let’s say you’re putting up the curtain, ron and all the tools you had. We were craftsman. And at one point you needed that level that i mentioned and you say, bob, give me a level. Well, if the level i gave you was a stanley, would you refuse to use it? Because it was a question like all the other tools? Probably not. You would. You would use the tools at hand. Okay. In that non-profit space, most of these frameworks, our proprietary, this one belongs to ran. That one belongs to the rental of ill institute, the third one’s associated with this with this person or this institution. As a result, what traditionally happened was, let us say, a representative of that organization or the consultant came in and they would wind up basically saying to non-profits my model b a, b, c or d it’s the bass dramatic of outcome frameworks. It slices it, dices it chops, it walks the dog. It does everything. The problem is, none of them do everything. All of them do something. All of them. Do several somethings some of them do some things very well, but none of them do everything well. And so what we wound up doing was inadvertently offering them the space, a defense, eighty percent solutions to one hundred percent problems. It’s telling people, for example, that the logic model was the be all and end all was one such example. My concept is, and the reason is called the toolbox in the book, i do not care about the authorship, the ownership, the providence or anything else about any of these tools. If it works, i want you to use it, and i’m not going to tell you not to use it because you’re not using the other pieces of the same sex that’s the concept truly a toolbox reaching grab what works for you, and if you’re not oriented towards tools, think about it as a kitchen, you know, again, you know, if you have ah, you know, one brand of, you know, say, blender and another brand of you’re not going to not use them to the same meal because the different brands you’re going to use, what you need now, you’re in my space because now i mean that’s for my easy bake oven days. Okay, right. The kitchenware. That’s. What if that’s why i went there? I can see that was resonating with much more comfortable with spatulas than i am. Phillips head screwdriver. First time i used when i had to go to the emergency room that’s because you were trying to scrape a pan with. So the book has a lot of model of of these tools. Talks about, i don’t know, maybe a dozen or so. Some of the simplest ones are you get what you measure results based accountability, even one from mckinsey and company capacity assessment tool. But maybe not those necessary. But a lot of the tools in the toolbox do emanate from corporate outcomes. Measurements. Some of the some of the latter ones. A lot of, you know, there’s. A lot of what are what? No. Why is it translatable? I mean, from for-profit enough, for-profit you know, a lot of times not-for-profits community is worried about things that come from corporations. Yeah, with peter drucker. Except for money. Then i will write a cz investigators investors. But but now there is that fear. What were some of the lessons peter drucker made the comment that non-profit should be run more like business. And everyone thought that, you know, he was he was the prostate, and he was ah, heretical and my god, you know, corporations of big, nasty things. And after all we care, you know, we were the non-profit sector. The truth of the matter is that no one is more interested in outcomes in the corporate world. Now they tend to call the court that their outcomes profitability, market share, etcetera. But the idea is they’ve been leading the way literally since, you know henry ford was putting model tease out of on assembly line, there are tools, for example, like six sigma, there are tools eichsteadt saying, sabat against there are tools like six, six, six sigma six sigma. The question is, what the hells of sigma and where the six of them that’s explained in the book it’s basically a measure of quality. All right, six sigma focuses on how many failure rates are there per million opportunities to fail. I mean, you don’t really have to get into that, but the concept is it has some key insight something for example, like t q m t q jargon jail. Oh, ok, you know, you know, take your total quality, man. You know, i didn’t know what i mean. That’s what a quantum! And i’m not gonna go lock myself in georgian jail. What it means is critical to quality most non-profits when they’re designing a programme, do not ask this question, as the corporate world does with corporal world is launching and launching an effort one of the first things under six six but they would do is say, what is the most critical part of this that we need to have? If a non-profit were to adopt that kind of that kind of concept and that kind of analysis, it could go very, very far towards helping them focus on the most important parts of a program, the key things that they absolutely must have. But this is a a perspective that is very often far into the non-profit space, but very, very built into the corporate space, particularly using something like six sigma, i see a future masters degree in non-profit outcomes engineering yet it’s perfect, exactly there’ll be exactly well, but when we have maybe a moment, so we can talk about something called serve qual, which they use in pizza hut, if you imagine, think a tool from pizza being used in the non-profit space now that’s the that’s the suggestion that we talked about, regrettably, we’re out of moments right of moments, but the lesson is don’t be fearful of what comes from the non-profit from from the for-profit sector because these are all important, easily quantified things that corporations are focusing on, like earnings per share in a quarter, right? Exactly. And how do you get there? What do you need to do to get there? The book is the non-profit outcomes toolbox, a complete guide to program effectiveness, performance measurement and results published by wally wiley and sons, you’ll find robert penn is blogged at outcomes, outcomes toolbox, dot com robert, thank you very much for being on the show. Pleasure. Thank you very much for having it was a pleasure and enjoyed immensely. Thank you. Very valuable interview and and a really valuable book. That non-profit outcomes. Toolbox. I got to start sending live listener love because we have in studio love. It’s. Incredible. My sister in law, christi weber. My niece by marriage. Morocco. Weber. My father in law, which also happens to be by marriage, pete drum, live in the studio, it’s. Unbelievable friends, jason kapoor and mark silverman, friends of mine from here in the city, and i, a visitor from from baden hyre, germany. Julia lights, julia, guten tag, all live listeners, all in the studio. At this moment, of course, we’ve got live listeners around the world, including kandahar, afghanistan, which is where my nephew is listening from shout out to him in afghanistan. Right now, we take a break when we come back. Tony’s, take two, and then amy sample ward, optimize your social profiles hanging there. They didn’t think that shooting, getting dink, dink, dink, dink. You’re listening to the talking alternative network, waiting to get me anything. Nothing. Cubine are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight free that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way look forward to serving you. Hi, i’m ostomel role, and i’m sloan wainwright, where the host of the new thursday morning show the music power hour. Eleven a m. We’re gonna have fun. Shine the light on all aspects of music and its limitless healing possibilities. We’re going invite artists to share their songs and play live will be listening and talking about great music from yesterday to today, so you’re invited to share in our musical conversation. Your ears will be delighted with the sound of music and our voices. Join austin and sloan live thursdays at eleven a. M on talking alternative dot com. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Durney hi, this is claire meyerhoff from the plan giving agency. If you have big dreams but a small budget, you have a home at tony martignetti non-profit radio. Welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent let’s ah, let’s, move into tony’s, take two this week on my blogged is let’s help a non-profit listener listener matt from minnesota, centene emailed me a question that his office was having a problem with seems that about six thousand of their end of year appeal letters went out asking people for the wrong donation amount because the spreadsheets or the query didn’t quite line up on dh. It had incorrect previous year’s donation amounts, so a fifty, dollar donors from two thousand twelve was said in the letter to have given fifteen hundred and was asked for a two thousand dollar gift when something more like seventy five or one hundred would have been appropriate and that went out about six thousand people. So matt was wondering, what do you think we should do? And i’ve got a bunch comments on the blogged from people around the country offering advice, and you can give your advice. Also, most of the comments run along the lines of send a very contrite letter, you know, apologize very explicitly and say that you’re taking steps so that it never happens again and that, you know, we value every donor. We’re very sorry and please don’t stop supporting us that’s the way most of the comments run, but you can give your advice to matt in minnesota, the post is called let’s help a non-profit listener and it’s on my block at tony martignetti dot com. I also want you to know that i’m going to be at bebe con this coming monday. The thirtieth of september b become is the blackbaud conference it’s going to be at the gaylord conference center outside washington, d c i’ll be there all day monday, doing interviews for the show got interviews lined up on mobile giving e-giving tuesday, which is a hashtag on twitter e-giving getting different society level gif ts building a fund-raising board fraud protection and a bunch more amy sample ward will be there as well. I’ll be talking to her as if we don’t talk to her enough, but she’s going to be there be becoming also, and i’m giving away some consulting time on monday. Two hours there’s two different ways to win one hour of consulting time you can either ah tweet on using the hashtag non-profit radio on monday and if you do that, you’ll be entered into a contest, and the other way is if you’re at the big con, come to the stage where i’ll be doing the interviews on the exhibit floor and drop your business card in the bowl and i’ll select a business card at the end of the day and one of you a tte. The conference will win a free hour of consulting it’s your choice can have either plant e-giving consulting or charity registration. Two different ways to win i’m giving away on our of sorry two hours of free consulting on monday, so have to either see you would be become or see your tweets using the hashtag non-profit radio, and that is tony’s take two for friday, twenty seventh of september thirty eighth show of the year. I’m always privilege to welcome amy sample ward back she’s, the ceo of the non-profit technology network, and ten her most recent co authored book is social change anytime everywhere about online multi-channel engagement her block is amy sample, ward, dot or ge and she’s at amy r s ward on twitter. Welcome back, amy, thanks for having me, you sound terrific, you’re you’re in toronto, on skype, right? I am. Can you hear me? Ok, actually, yes, sounds very, very good, actually sounds almost sort of studio quality. You must be in a nice, quiet room. What were you doing in toronto? I i’m not. I’m actually in a hallway, but i’m glad it soon. Good. I’m here for our test interactions with the conference yesterday, and a lot of it was a lot of fun, actually, people from all different sides of the non-profit technology, a topic coming together and a lot of a lot of case studies sharing what they have been working on, things like that, okay? And, uh, you want to share one thing that is memorable for you so far from the conference. I was really excited how many people were there ready to talk about data, not as a like idea, but people saying, oh, so we’ve been measuring x and we have seen this trend have you seen it? You know, and really jumping into commerce stations with the expectation that everyone else was also really looking at their impact, really trying to quantify what they were doing and, you know, share their tips or commiserating in some failures together. Cool sounds like a lot of valuable cross talk, all right? Yeah, i guess you’re going from toronto to washington area for b becomes yes, exactly. Okay, we’ll talk about that a little later. I know i’ll be seeing you there, but we want to talk about today optimizing your social profile. So we’re getting a little a little a little tactical today. Sometimes we’re sometimes were strategic and little, well, theoretical, but always valuable, but today would be a little tactical. Um, wait, we got to keep our social profiles, whether it’s, facebook, twitter, these have to be aligned with our work. How do we how do we make sure we’re doing that? Well, it’s, you know, i think a lot of people start from this place where they have heard that, you know, social channels, all these social profiles are an opportunity to extend their brand or you really make themselves visible out there. And so that here these kind of jargon, jail type phrases and think, oh, great, so we just put up a facebook page and, you know, put slap our logo on it, just like our website. Excuse me. Hey, but in reality, that’s not what? Extending your branded but also doesn’t match what’s happening there. It isn’t a good representation of your mission. So how can those channel really serve that goal? Well, think about it. Not just and here’s your logo and your profile picture, but who are the people behind your organization or who had that? Supporters? You know, how do you how do you let those social channels? The social, but also really clear photos, text, etcetera. You could explain just what you do, you know, it’s an opportunity. All the webs, you know, website like present that different but targeted across across the web. You know what i think about organizations that do kind admission direction well, you, whatever channel you’re on, you know, it’s, but it feels different each one feels like, you know, a different room in the same house, you know, the living room is maybe still the same style of the people that lived there, but it has more couches and maybe a fireplace, and then you go into the kitchen and again, maybe same style of the people that lived there, but this is where, you know, there’s more lights, there’s, a bunch of cookery, etcetera. So so how how do you make that on the different social profiles will, first of all, don’t forget that they’re trying to help you. You know, you don’t want to try and hide all of the different components of that facebook page, for example, let those pieces be there because people on facebook, i expect them to be there used them to your advantage, you know, you don’t and feel the furniture out of every room where all the way across the house really put, you know, make those counters. The best darn couch is, they could be in the living room, even though maybe there you’re branded colors and they met kayman uniform makes sense, but before and even before you start there, i mean, you have to take a look at which channels you should even be in, you know? You’re talking about a lion with where your people are, you know, you you have to know that and what we’re just what sites are appropriate for your for your work and your people exactly, and some of that, you know, i’m always surprised when i think data is important and helpful and valuable, and if you can look at data to say, oh, wow, you know that the demographics of these certain tools or that you know, our our community, probably there that’s only one side of the equation just because you may have a bunch of, you know, parents between the ages of thirty six and forty five in your community, it doesn’t mean that they necessarily want to be engaging with your programs and content on facebook just because demographically, they’re probably on facebook, they maybe see facebook is a, you know, a place to go share photos of beds with their parents. You know what? It’s nine o’clock at night and they’ve finally gotten tohave happen our to themselves, they don’t want to. Spend a half hour with you, you know, maybe there’s a different channel for your for engaging with your community beyond just what the demographics say. So i think you have to also look at what is the content you even delivering just because your people, maybe you’re on twitter, the content you’re sharing with them, maybe can’t ever fit in one hundred forty characters are maybe isn’t something they’re going to pick out of their twitter street. You know anyone? Who’s just opened up twitter and let it sit there it’s just flowing by so finding a match between like you said, your community and the channel, but also your content in the channel and made it may just not make sense to be posted there. Okay, we’re going toe were to take a break on dh. Well, amy and i have ah, well, extra time today, so we’re going to keep talking about aligning your work with the social networks where you where you ought to be, how to keep consistent with the brand and even, you know, if you happen to be in a campaign, how to do that promotion successfully and when we come right back. It’ll be mohr live listener, love. Stay with us. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Oppcoll are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Lots more live listener love we’ve got listeners in moscow in chung ching, beijing and shenzhen, china, for those in china knee how? Seoul, korea, seoul always checks in always multiple people in seoul i love that anya haserot for our listeners in in korea and also tokio japan frequently have people from japan could each awhile. All right, amy, um let’s, let’s, wait, we got to get to some details here so we don’t leave people which i know concerns you as well, you know, we don’t leave people with more questions than answers, so let’s let’s get in. I mean, how do you how would you test whether twitter that’s a great example because it does go by so fast? What questions would you asked to determine whether twitter is a good platform for you? Treyz well, i mean, i think we’ve talked about this on the show before and that is try to do some research, ask people directly, you know, do you want to be engaging with us on this channel? A are you using this channel? You know, just try and get that information, but there is nothing like the empirical proof of just testing. It and, you know, setting up a profile even if it isn’t, you know, necessarily the most intense organizational profile, and you have a mess of content strategy if you just want to devote a couple weeks testing the channel tested out, see how it goes, keep track of what you’re doing, you know, organisations that have really been able to increase amount of engagement on twitter have done things like, you know, don’t just track all we put, we tweeted, and people reply just but say what time of day did the most retweets happened? Not just when did you tweet, but when we’re other people finding your content and re posting it, you know or how many times did people reply or or retweet a certain post versus another one? Okay, what was special about that content? You know, really tryingto understand the mechanics of what’s going on with the community there because, you know again, it is both the content and the people that your you have to try and match, so testing it out is the only way to really you know, prue? What? What does that what doesn’t work okay? And then, of course, you have all your analytics, the analytical tools also, exactly. Okay, let’s, talk about the profile now, since you know we’re supposed to say we’re focusing on the profile what you get let’s, keep with the twitter example, but then we’ll look at a couple others because you and i have some extra time together today twitter, twitter, your your limited number of characters you khun you can devote to your profile how how do you know what belongs in there? Upleaf well, i think what what belongs first of all is the shortest version of what you can say about your mission. Next is who it is that’s tweeting because at the end of the day, no one thinks it’s actually quote unquote your organization, they know it’s, some staff, a person or people, so call it out, make that transparent, and then leslie is including a link backto either you know what i mean to your website, but i would encourage you not to just use the home page of your website to send people to a more tailored entry, whether that’s, you know, maybe a community page where you linked to your different social profiles and then expect people to be, you know, clicking back and saying, oh, this is where you know they engage or maybe of a specific program area you want a link to but include that direct connection back to the website let’s, talk about facebook profiles. What if you have? If you’ve gone through your analytics, you determine that facebook is a suitable platform for you is what you’re goingto do on your facebook profile. It’s going to be different than twitter? I mean, it allows more media, too. Yeah, exactly. And you know it, what you do with that profile, especially on a channel like facebook where there’s, just so much content opportunity, you’re setting the tone for how you want people to engage with that page, are you? You know you have a really engaging, bright fun, you know, header, photo and and you are posting photos along with your text well, that’s encouraging the community to also pose that you know, that’s, the content they seize on the page, or are you you know, do not even have a header image, and then you just have your logo is your profile photo, and you’re just, you know, constantly posting links. To your website? Well, if that’s the nasty example no one’s going to post because they don’t have a link to your website to share, you know, you really think about it as, like here’s, the example of what you want the community to do and build it out around that which is why, you know, some of the most engaging facebook pages, the ones that have, you know, the most number of people that like it, but also consistently engaged with paige are ones that have photos of the community or, you know, photos from events that the organization has done things where people go to the page and they see it as hears that window into the programs and the impact the organization is having and of course, you want to be there. Don’t you want to be a part of the fun impact and, you know, making that mission happen? Of course, you know, on one side, we certainly think that’s what people be on our website, but they just get so heavy and bogged down with every piece of content we’ve ever created and, you know, on the social profiles we get highlights the really great engaging pieces first, here we are talking about twitter and i get a little phone quick phone alerts when i give a new twitter follower. I just got a new twitter follower as we’re sitting here talking about twitter kapin remind, you have to be my niece who’s sitting in the studio, but no would take whatever the hell we can get it. And if you want to join my niece, you khun, you can follow me at tony martignetti um, let’s let’s keep keep going because, you know, i get i get a little ah troubled, always talking about twitter and facebook. Let’s, let’s, pick another couple profile what’s, another what’s, another another site that you see non-profits spending time on and doing well and again after you’ve been through your own analytics and you’ve tested it as amy was describing, you’ve described that this other channel, which is about to talk about, might make sense for you. What? What should your profile look like on that channel? What do want talk about amy? You know, i’ve seen some non-profits re certainly really doing a great job on instagram and, you know, it’s, obviously a morning platforms so you’re not going to see, you know, on facebook, sometimes you see a big organization has, like, you know, a thousand likes on a poster on a image, and you’re just not going to have a thousand likes on your instagram photo or video, but you’re still gonna have some, you know, andi, what i think is great is that organization you’re already planning and creating this content well, you have images, and you you have what, mr graham? So, you know, each channel could be the same quote unquote, like horse, which is packaged in different ways that makes sense for that channel. So including instagram in your your list of outlets, i think it’s great a great thing to test out to try see if you have community there because it’s so unlike facebook, where if you posted, you know, multiple posts and multiple photos and one day people would, you know, get a little turned off the algorithm is hiding your post already from, you know, most of your your fans, instagram there’s, no filter, no one, you know, whatever isn’t in the cds in the feed and it’s not the kind of channel where organizations they’re saying like if you post multiple times in a day, people are getting tired of it instead they’re like oh, cool, what are you doing now? You know, because that’s, the culture of that channel is cool. What what’s the photo? What are you doing now? And just kind of scrolling through them? Okay, now you and i devoted segment not too long ago, teo tumbler so and listeners could go back and look for that. So we’ll we’ll skip tumbler, but what’s, another what’s, another site you you’d like to talk about? Same, you know, same same you know what? What should you profile be focused on? Yeah, i mean, i think one as faras like this conversation of extending your brand and really you leveraging what the components of that platform are to engage people, you’ll bring them into your content. I think youtube is super underutilized because for non-profits you can have so many of the additional youtube customization tools and components for free so you can have a totally branded youtube channel. You could have called action and your video i mean there’s just so much that non-profits they’re missing out because, you know, even if you don’t have huge, like documentaries it’s not hard to create videos, especially now that, you know we’re all we’re all create them with their phone, even so having these short pieces, whether captured at events or, you know, even like a thirty second video that says we’re about to launch a campaign tomorrow you get ready and it’s just it’s just kind of there to make people feel like they’re in the know, and they’re part of your work again because you can post it to a channel that’s totally branded you could have, like, like folders, you know, hear all the videos about this topic on people can scroll through, i think there’s a lot of potential with youtube non-profit durney kapin okay, maybe we should devote a show. Teo youtube. Okay, okay. And those folders appreciated referring teo playlists. You can have a playlist on different topics like on mind theirs. B b com twenty twelve there’s different conferences have been too there’s. One for stand up comedy, i think that’s the folders you’re referring to yet played their playlist. Okay, okay. All right. You know, since we have the luxury of time, is there one more channel? You want to. You want to talk about? Hyre no. Okay, i don’t want to just spot, okay? Okay. Because you think about it. That’s ok? We got it. We got other topics. We don’t talk about depth on channels. Um, let’s, talk about your campaign. If you happen to have a campaign, whether it’s a thirty day campaign or, you know, a more traditional sort of campaigns, you know, might last three year, three, four years, you know, some capital campaigns go on that long. How do you expose that campaign within your within these the social sites profiles? Well, and then this goes back to the earlier point about really taking advantage of the specific functionality that each platform has, you know, unique teo like with facebook because that’s leverage that is very in the example. You have two photos that you get to take advantage of. You have that big header image, but then you also have your profile photo, and again, just how you are setting the tone for the kind of engagement you want there campaigns have also been really successful at taking advantage of that profile photo and encouraging people to eat to share that and they get their own profile photo. And really spreading the campaign message or brand that way, you know, because it’s facebook makes it very easy just click on something and say, make-a-wish my probono so where, you know, on other channels, it may not be quite as easy, but you see, you see similar profile photo based campaign extensions on twitter, you know, where they have, you know, i think it’s called a women are things like that where you’re just adding kind of an image layer on top of the photo, so it has a little, you know, i’m sure you’ve seen them stars are a little banner along the bottom that says, you know, media campaign hashtag etcetera so i think that’s a really clear called action for a campaign is like, okay, today we’re launching everyone make this your profile photo, for example, andi, i think one of the most recent, very large scale example that that was the hrc campaign about turning facebook red. Okay? Ohh even write human rights campaign. Yes. Ok. Yeah. And you know beyond just the image on the on the various profiles associated to a campaign. You also have the opportunity. If you are, you say running. A campaign where you’re really encouraging engagement on twitter and you know you have a pacific campaign hashtag go edit your twitter bio to say we are running this campaign the hashtag learned more so that as people retweets your tweets and they’re like, oh, my retreated this, i’m going to check him out, they don’t open up, you know your twitter profile and see okay, you’re some organization based wherever you know, make sure that you’re you’re actually updating the profile information on the different channels when you’re running a campaign and not just the image or don’t just start posting the content, make sure that you know the profile itself when people find you explain the campaign and just your organization. It’s probably so easy to forget toe update your profile here you are doing all this multi-channel strategy around a campaign on don’t forget toa talk about it and you’re and publicizing your profiles exactly because you set the profile up, you know it’s, not something that people keep up to date and that’s that’s sort of i mean, that’s really subsumed everything everything you’re saying you got news all the time profile is not something you only look at when you set up the accountant on don’t look at it that’s all subsumed in what you’re saying, right? Okay, especially during campaign times when you’re getting in theory, hopefully a lot more new people singing your social profile. Well, they’re saying that for the first time, they want to know why. Five friends, we’re just talking about you and of all that you have is information about your general mission. Well, they don’t know why they’re friends were talking about you, you know, it’s a great place to put some of those campaign hooks and called action just in a couple of minutes. We want to emphasize something that you and i have always talked about. This is not only multi-channel online, but you’re offline strategies have to coordinate with all this as well. Exactly. So that was your if you are planning to have any direct mail pieces, you know, make sure those match up and it’s a great way to think we checked before time. Direct mail drops with when you launch things online, so send an email that says, hey, we’re going to be, you know, standing up for this campaign a couple days later and direct mail piece comes and then you know, that same day or the next day, you really launch it on social well, by the time you tweeted they’ve already seen it three times in really personal ways that got emails, they got, you know, postcards and now you posted about it on twitter there, ready to actually engage. Excellent. Okay, we have to leave that topic there. It’s time for your your first sixty second style stop. Wei had this. We’re talking. Yeah, we’re talking about either travel or leisure or food. What? What do you have? Sixty seconds. Only sixty second style stop. Oh, my goodness. Well, i was thinking about this today because i am actually traveling and my at least my personal tip is whatever i need right after i land whether it’s, my pajama or, you know, food, whatever. I put that in my like purser carryon bag because i hate feeling like i have to unpack my entire suitcase just to go to bed when i get to the hotel in the night or something, you know that way, whatever you actually need in your first few hours where you land is in the same bag outstanding. Cool. Thank you for sharing. Yeah. From the hallway in toronto. Amy sample war. Exactly. Any simple board ceo of non-profit technology network you’ll find her blah, gamey sample war dot or ge, and on twitter at amy rs ward and i’ll be seeing you on monday with your co author, alison kapin, right? Yeah, and looking forward to it. Okay, cool metoo haven’t seen you for a while. Bye, amy. I think i got some last minute live listener love new bern, north carolina, paradise valley, arizona bloomfield, new jersey and bill in court, france welcome live listener love and, of course, always to our podcast listeners podcast pleasantries, always grateful for the podcast listeners next week. Roger, matt lov and joy hunter show you are the co authors of non-profit investment and development solutions, a guide to thriving in today’s economy, and they will be with me for the hour over nine thousand leaders, fundraisers and board members of small and midsize charities listen each week, you know how to reach me. If you’d like to talk about sponsoring the show, we’ve got one that’s going to be starting next week, early october. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is our line producer, shows social media is by deborah askanase of community organizer two point. Oh, the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules, and our music is by scott stein. I hope you’ll be with me next friday, one to two p, m eastern on talking alternative broadcasting at talking alternative dot com e-giving didn’t think dick tooting getting thinking. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. E-giving nothing. Good. Are you a female entrepreneur ready to break through? Join us at sixty body sassy sol, where women are empowered to ask one received what they truly want in love, life and business. Tune in thursday, said noon eastern time to learn timpson juicy secrets from inspiring women and men who, there to define their success, get inspired, stay motivated and defying your version of giant success with sexy body sake. Soul. Every thursday ad, men in new york times on talking alternative dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. You’re listening to talking alternative network at www dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication. And the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership? Customer service sales or maybe better writing are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com that’s improving communications, dot com improve your professional environment. Be more effective, be happier. And make more money. Improving communications. That’s. The answer. Talking dot com.

160: Nonprofit Outcomes Toolbox & News Sources/New Source – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Dr. Robert Penna, author of “The Nonprofit Outcomes Toolbox.”

Maria Semple, The Prospect Finder, consultant in prospect research and author of “Panning for Gold: Find Your Best Donor Prospects Now!”

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent for friday, september twentieth i’m your aptly named host. Oh, you know that i hope you were with me last week. I’d be put through mitral regurgitation if i heard that you had missed cause marketing one oh one trish in naper, principal manager at alcoa foundation and mounir panjwani, business development manager at do something dot or ge shared tips for getting started in cause marketing and internal social networks. Scott koegler, our technology contributor and the editor of non-profit technology news, explained how internal social networks compliment the external networks like twitter and facebook this week. The non-profit outcomes toolbox dr robert penna, author of the non-profit outcomes toolbox, discusses the wave of reliance on outcomes measurement and gives concrete steps and tools so that small and midsize shops can stay ahead of this increasing trend toward outcomes assessment. This is part one of our interview from a previous show, and part two is going to be next week. Also, news sources new source maria simple are dyin of dirt, cheap and free ideas in prospect research and the prospect finder she’s got advice for you on which news sources are best for your research and a new free offering from the foundation center called foundation directory online, plus her sixty second style stop. We’re going tow! Try having one minute tips on style like travel, food and leisure from guests. I’ll be anxious to know what you think about these sixty second style stops between the guests on tony’s take two my block this week is planned e-giving saved our ass and also i want to tell you about bb con coming up, i’m going to be there will say a little about that got contests that’s in tony’s, take two my pleasure now to give you my interview with dr robert penna and the non-profit outcomes toolbox. My guest now is robert penna. He is the author of a complete i’m sorry, the non-profit outcomes toolbox, a complete guide to program effectiveness, performance measurement and results published by wiley and sons he’s, a consultant, and his work includes the application of corporate sector, outcome based tools and insights to the work of non-profits he’s done work for the n e casey foundation, the national geographic foundation and the ford. Foundation he’s, an adviser to charity navigator on outcomes. I’m very glad that his work and his book bring him to the studio. Robert. Welcome. Thank you very much for having pleasure to have you. Thank you for coming all the way down from albany. No problem. Live in the studio. In the studio. We hear an increasing amount of talk about outcomes, outcomes, measurement. Why is that? I would save it for basically two reasons. The ones historical. The fact is that traditionally and this goes back easily to the beginning of the last century. No one ever asked non-profits to be quite fair, no one ever asked non-profits to either show evidence of or to demonstrate that they were having an actual impact. That was sort of a field of dreams and concept. If we make it available, things must get better. And it was taken on faith that train people with good programs with enough money would bring about positive change. Nobody actually quite asked that all started to change in the late seventies and then into the eighties, and quite independently of one another in various spaces. This concept of a focus on results in outcomes. And evidence of the same started a crop up, and it began to coalesce and particularly as we are in an in an era of limited resource is it becomes more important than ever for non-profits to be able to say here’s actual evidence of what we’ve accomplished, as opposed to a story about how big the problem is or how hard we’re trying in his forward. Ken berger, president, ceo of charity navigator who’s been a guest on the show, says that measurement is a battle for the very soul of the nonprofit sector. Ah, it’s taking on that great a prominence? Yes, it is that actually that line comes from a from an article ken and i co co authored it really is because there are those apologised who honestly believe in its ah term used before a fair exchange of differing ideas who honestly believe that non-profits and their clients should not be held. Tio this kind of accountability that the concept of just making services available truly is the mission of the non-profit space and that as long as they’re doing that, they’re doing their job. The problem is that for all of the money we’ve spent thes problems haven’t gone away, and so the question is, shouldn’t we be putting our our resource is into those programs into those organizations that have proven that there having the most beneficial impact, as opposed to giving it to other places that are perhaps not being as effective? The problems are too big, and the resource is of too scarce not to do this anymore, but it truly is a battle within the sector because there are those who just don’t believe in it, and we’ll get to a little of what their arguments are, maybe obliquely only, but that some of the ideas are so nebulous that they can’t be measured that like a child feeling a more positive ah feeling about education or about going to school, sort of nebulous ideas like that, but actually, those, um, sort of feel good outcomes can be measured. Well, first off, i would argue that if an organization is focusing primarily or almost or solely on feel good outcomes, they’re rethinking what they’re doing. Number one but number two there are proxies. There are proxies in terms of attitude, in terms of behaviour, in terms of various other kinds. Of things that can be looked at and can be taken as fairly accurate measures of whether or not if what you want to changes in attitude, whether or not that attitude has changed so it can be done, and we’re gonna talk about some of the ways that non-profits get there and the way that we can measure these things, um, is the butt is the story is the non-profits story the compelling story is that is that dead? Well, it it shouldn’t be dead, but what it should be, what should happen is that should be put in its place. Okay? The idea of telling a story is not a bad one, in fact, that there’s a whole chapter in the book that talks about using narrative as opposed to just factoids, because people remember stories where they have a tendency to forget much more vivid right stories vivid. But the problem is, if the if the story first off focuses on how big the problem is and that’s all it, it focuses on, and there are a number of non-profits i won’t name any, but you could probably think of them. You get things in the mail. And they show you the picture of x, y or z and it’s always how big the problem is, when we’re telling that kind of story and that’s all we’re telling we are in a way, avoiding entirely the question of, well, what do you doing about it and what other results that you have that you have achieved so that’s one one reason why the story has to be put in his proper place? The second is, and i don’t know whether we’ll get into this today, but a lot of non-profits wind up telling the wrong story for the wrong reason and ofttimes to the wrong people so that something has to be carefully handled as well. Okay, we have just another minute before a break, what if not a named example? What do you mean? Telling the wrong story? A lot of non-profits will focus on an emotional story that will highlight, for example, a success story, and it will be about this client of that client, but inadvertently, what they’re doing is they’re focusing the attention on that client. What we don’t know is, is that story cherry picked? How representative actually, is it what they’re not talking about is thie the the work that the organization as a whole does it’s it’s, shall we say, it’s it’s, macro impact. They focus so specifically on the story of this particular client at that particular client, it becomes very easy for their overall message of what they’re doing to be lost, counterproductive in counterfeit. His book is the non-profit outcomes, toolbox, it’s, robert penna. You’ll find his blogged outcomes, toolbox, dot com, and he’ll be with me after this break, so stay with us talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Do you need a business plan that can guide your company’s growth? Seven and seven will help bring the changes you need. Wear small business consultants and we pay attention to the details. You may miss our coaching and consultant services a guaranteed to lead toe. Right, groat. For your business, call us at nine. One seven eight three, three, four, eight six zero foreign, no obligation free consultation. Check out our website of ww dot covenant seven dot com oppcoll are you fed up with talking points? Rhetoric everywhere you turn left or right? Spin ideology no reality, in fact, its ideology over intellect no more it’s time. Join me, larry shot a neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven easter for the isaac tower radio in the ivory tower will discuss what’s important to you society, politics, business and family. It’s provocative talk for the realist and the skeptic who want to know what’s. Really going on? What does it mean? What can be done about it? So gain special access to the ivory tower. Listen to me, larry sharp your neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven new york time go to ivory tower radio dot com for details. That’s, ivory tower radio dot com everytime was a great place to visit for both entertainment and education. Listening. Tuesday nights nine to eleven. It will make you smarter. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com dahna welcome back to tony martignetti non-profit radio talking to robert penna about his book the non-profit outcomes toolbox right before the break, robert, we were talking about, um, for too much focus on problems. But the non-profit sectors exists to solve problems. So shouldn’t they be talking about what the problems are? Well, again, it has to be put into its proper place into its proper perspective. And this is not, you know, women, teo, bash the sector. Okay. I mean, we have to be honest and say this is a historical perspective and very early on this was how attention was brought. Tea to issues were literally going back to the late eighteen hundreds and early nineteen hundreds. Um, people, for example, he’d carry nation she’s well known for wanting tio bring about prohibition. Well, what she talked about was all of the ancillary downsides of alcoholism, all right, and the folk. But the focus was on drink. The focus was on people drinking too much. And the idea was they didn’t think, think it through to say, well, what’s really gonna happen. What other causes here. It was just focused on the drinks. So we had prohibition and guess what? All of those issues did not go away. The issues of broken families, the issues of domestic violence, the issues of unemployment, the issues of of poverty didn’t go away just because, well, we got rid of alcohol for those period that period of time. So part of the problem of the focus on just the problem is it tends to lead to simplistic answers because the concept is that progress is a lack of the problem when, in point of fact, really, the outcomes approach is that what you want to do is bring about some positive change that goes beyond merely an absence of the problem. So that’s one of the problems with focusing on just the problem, the second thing is that it kind of takes you off the hook if you think about it, for having to say, really what you have done to alleviate the problem or what success you’ve had in alleviating the problem. If every time i come back to you, pick an issue, homeless puppies, i come to you and i sent put something in the mail and tony, you know, look at all these starving puppies, and i say it was ten thousand starving puppies and you know it, justin in manhattan or something. That’s, a problem. And you emotionally are expected to resupply with a cheque will. Now, next year i come back and i say, well, now, there’s ten thousand homeless puppies. This still ten thousand homeless puppies will again. What it keeps focusing on is the problem. It does not focus on am i having an impact on alleviating situation. So that’s, a real son of short way of describing why that tends to be a ah sort of a circle, you know, like the snake eating its own tail. It really doesn’t get you where you need to pay. And you alluded to earlier the fact that we do still have deep seated, entrenched problems that we have been working on for generations like homelessness, entrenched poverty, etcetera. Exactly right be a hunger of broken family, you name it, these problems, or of worldwide. And so you might even get thes these appeals from any place on the globe. But it tends to in a lot of ways, i think the lead to a sense of defeat because, i mean, think about it if every single year you get the same appeal from the same organization showing the same picture of the same a person in need. The question starts to hate begs the question, well, what’s happening with my money, what we’ve been at it for so long, and we’re still seeing the same right? The one problem? One gentleman i speak speaking to someone’s ago, he runs a non-profit e program in ohio, and he said to me, well, do candy said, you know, we’ve been fighting this war on poverty for, you know, forty something years, and i’m not so sure we have anything to show for it. And part of the reason is that from the beginning, what we have to show for it was not the accent the accent was on making money available and making programs available. You’ve heard a thousand times there, the concept, the underserved community, right, which you could argue about whether they’re actually underserved enough but that’s a different story. But the question is what it seems to lead to. It leads to the implication that if you make services available, things will be better. Well, that’s not necessarily true. Just making them available, zach. Will will result in the outcome that you want exactly, and for years social investors you know, traditionally called funders, we’re investing in making services available rather than investing in change, and if you’re investing in change, then there ought to be sameer marks of the change. The whole concept of moving your your your your head away from the idea of being a thunder what’s being an investor is one of the first the first steps what’s a funder and interested in a funder, is interested in the dispersement of funds. In terms of the process, the paperwork who’s it going to what’s it being used for what’s, an investor interest is an investor and investor wants a return let’s talk about some more of the language differences that you point out not so much differences, but the important language around outcomes measurement that takes up roughly the first third of the book or so gent generally outputs versus outcomes outputs of what you do outcomes of what happens because of what you did okay example of an output and output is training class, and the outcome would be that somebody got a job by virtue of having been trained and more importantly, kept the job for a reasonable amount of time. When and this was this was rampant in the late sixties and seventies. Excuse me when thanks to largely to government, we got into being counting and compliance organisations were measured onto in terms of how many fannies their head in the seats, how many training training class they help? Well, that was great. But then it turned out in some cases people we trained for jobs that no longer existed or the training was insufficient, or there really was no placement attached to it. So we had organizations claiming success because they’ve had x number of fannies in the seats, or because they held so many training’s or the game, but someone certificates. But the end of the day was anybody hyre did anybody did anybody’s life improved? Well, don’t ask me that question when i focused on that were protest on how many training on the output not come from the outcomes spring from the outputs. Yes, yes, you need the outputs in order to get the outcomes and they have to be the right outputs. But again, if that is only just your focus is there’s a saying that a colleague of mine, a colleague of mine who wrote a book, if well, you fundez activity that’s usually all you get? Yes. Okay. All right. Impact, impact flows from outcome. What? Tell us about it and that’s down the road that’s down the road. In other words, for example, let us say that what you were talking about was bringing possible water. And this is something i was engaged in a t united nations potable water, fresh water supplies to certain kinds of villages. I was pronouncing potable. Is that okay? Potable vote on a laudable somebody made a tomato, somebody from and why you were calling correct one of us. I have to. But i was so it’s possible that anyone, when you’re with the united nations. So that’s a hyre i’m just tony martignetti non-profit radio it’s hyre hyre hyre stand. But you had a situation where okay you’re you’re bringing fresh water and now you could think of a host of reasons early on why you might want to do that. One of the more interesting ones to me was to alleviate the burden on the women and girls in the village usually whose job it is to do nothing while david hole water one of the reasons why their educational opportunities were so so stunted was because, well, gee, somebody’s got to get the water and that’s the woman and children’s job rather a woman and girls job. Well, let us say that you bring it in and let us say that some girl does get to go to school. Well, perhaps if twenty years later, when she’s an adult, she actually has a business and gets out of the out of the village, that might be an impact. But the problem with the focusing on impacts these long term impacts is very often the causal chain is extremely weak. The causal chain is broken and it’s kind of hard. Teo teo to take credit for some things. I mean, we’ve all heard the stories of the head start program that’s taking credit because thirty five years later, one of their graduates became the head of some, you know, ceo of some company. Well, you know, thanks, snusz because back in nineteen forty seven, he was with us in today’s end of a corporation. I don’t know about that, but i honestly would say impacts agreed to have these are the kinds of things you see in mission statements and vision statements, the long term impacts, what organizations need to do is figure out how to translate those things into measurable, achievable, significant, meaningful outcomes. Okay? And shortly, we’re gonna talk about the outcome statement and contrast it with the mission statement and talk about what the elements are and how to get to ah, no a ah, a proper and and viable outcome statement. So yeah, and and just around impacts you say in the book impacts or what we hoped for, outcomes are what we work for. We’ve talked about that means your outcomes or what you’re working toward the impact of the the longer term we we we talked about funder donorsearch versus investor, anything else you want to say about the about? Maybe non-profits looking at themselves as invest, ese. Well, that’s, that’s a very good point. I mean, when someone gives you a gift christmas gift. Okay, now we’ve all had the relative who gives us something. And then every once a while checks oh, yeah? Are you using it? You? Have you been? Did you like the sweater? Most people that give you a gift, they hope you like it, but they really don’t have any kind of control. Now. My grandmother used to give me cash. She would slip me cash in by hand like a handshake, and she would always say, spend it like you earned it. My grandmother never did that. You didn’t know i’m sorry. You know, my grandmother borrowed but no that’s, um, we’re not related event starting now, but the idea is when someone gives you a gift really the in most cases, the strings got, you know, the the very there, the influence they have over the use of that gift, et cetera. Well, the problem is, when you think of yourself, if you’re a non-profit as a grantee of donor of a donation or giving, okay, the implication that the onus is on you to deliver something back to that to that donor to that investor is i like to use use the term is much less clear than if you see them as investors and you see yourself as an invested because right from the start from the basic language, what we’re making clear is that you owe them a return investments give returns exactly. And so the mindset shifts that i mentioned before the first one is moving from the concept of thunder to investor. The second is moving from the concept that what we’re investing in is the provision of services opposed to we’re investing in change. And then what are those changes and how do you define them? And the third thing is that we are going to be satisfied with an account of activity as opposed to actual evidence of results, performance and effectiveness thes air three crucial mindset shifts that the space has to eventually and will adopt, and the sooner non-profits get on this, the better off they’ll be. You quote stephen covey saying, it is incredibly easy to be very busy without being very effective. Well, we’ve always have seen those people who can, you know, go to the office in the busy all day, and at the end of the day, what have they actually accomplished? And the answer is, you know, not a heck of a lot and that’s, you know, that’s, the wife, i’m with robert pennant he’s, the author of the non-profit outcomes toolbox. Let’s, talk a little about the outcome statement versus the how does it contrast with the mission statement? The well, mission statements of very often pie in the sky and aspirational mean they ought to be yes, and an inspirational okay, okay, but the idea is that the idea that we’re going to solve a problem in our time, we’re gonna end poverty. We’re gonna end homeless. Is thies air the kinds of things that you very often see working their way into? Ah, emission statement or vision statement. The problem is that how do you then actually turn around and effectuated if you basically go to an investor and they said, what do you know what we’re going to? We’re going to end and homelessness well, you’re probably not. So when you don’t, what do you could do? You come back and say i failed an outcome statement is based upon a couple of key characteristics that good outcomes have among those are all right. It’s, meaningful it’s not a cosmetic change. It’s sustainable that’s. A very, very important one, right? It’s achievable. All right, there’s. An old statement. Everyone talks about the weather. No one does anything about it. Why? Because global warming aside, it’s. Tough to do anything about the weather. All right, but if you ah, couch your your goals in not slam dunks you want, they want them to be doable with a stretch. You clearly want to push yourself. All right. But the idea is that you want it to be something that can be achieved in your lifetime on dh something that can be measurable. The sustainable part is particularly crucial. I think of my involvement. I’m a lifelong scout on fifty. Eight years old and your first join the boy scouts when i was ten kayman eagle scout well, i never made it that i was in the order. The arrow you want? Ditigal oh, no, no, no it’s different. But i have a son who was in the order of the arrow and he’s an eagle scout like vicarious thrills. But we i remember ah, project where are we going to clean up a lot. And tha this lot had been used as a dumping ground. The scouts came in and we weed whackers and rakes and tree pruners. And we’re trying to look like a park who had done right and we congratulate ourselves. Up, up, up we all went home in that night’s peace. Somebody dumped a refrigerator. It wasn’t a sustainable achievement because we didn’t have the facility for either blocking it office, stopping people from dumping again. So the concept has to be again in terms of a good outcome, one of the characteristics and aki one is this concept of sustainability, but again, to go back to your question about the difference between a mission statement of vision statement and an outcome statement a lot. Of organizations all right have a tough time differentiating in the book i refer to ah, vision approach. You may recall the book in the book, i had a picture of some futuristic city, teo illustrate that my belief is that mission statement envision statements are both great things that good ideas, they’re visionary, they belong up on the wall, but they don’t belong in terms of you every day action plan, they’re different from an action plan it’s the difference be between having the long term goal of i wanted to be fit. I want to be trimmed and having an actual diet that you’re that you’re following. All right? Um, you know, there are numerous examples we could weigh could point to okay, i’m realizing now, since we’re talking about since i’m talking about being an eagle scout, i’m really you know, i didn’t measure the the outcomes of my eagle scout project, which was teo. Make sure that address is street addresses were visible to emergency services in my little town of altum panned new jersey, which had maybe three thousand homes or so, so we looked at every home and where there wasn’t a visible address. From the street that a policeman or fireman or the ambulance could find could see it easily. We left a note in the in the mailbox, and the note was signed by the police chief, the fire chief and the head of the angelus score. But that’s just that’s just activity. I don’t know what the outcome’s were. I don’t know if more lives were saved police response times, we’re reduced fire response times are reduced. That would have been right that would come into the out moment. And what? And if you had done the eagle project as an outcome, you know, an outcome based thing that was specifically the kinds of things that you would have wanted to look at. Now that was response time reduced, you know, i don’t know anything is dramatic, is we’re lives saved, but certainly were response times reduced. You could even you could even have done it as looking at things like ups, you know? Did ups have fewer lost deliveries because they were brought to the wrong home? All right, i have thiss factual case up in albany way way. Have to hold on your case. Feeling bad about my eagle project from thirty five years ago. This is tony martignetti tony martignetti non-profit radio we have to take a break after the break. We’ll be tony’s take two for two minutes and then i’ll return with robert penna. Stay with us now. We were going into a break. I’ll have the second half of that interview next week. You could tell you know he didn’t hey didn’t like that. I said i was an eagle scout and then he said he wasn’t an eagle scout. So that’s why, i think that’s ah that’s reflecting now, that’s. Why the bashing of my eagle scout project? That was a good project that i’m i got i got raves from the first aid core and the fire department in town. I remember that was a good project. All right, yes, we go away. I’ll have some live listening love. We got lots of live listeners tony’s take two and then maria simple she’s in the studio news sources. New source. Stay with me for all that they didn’t think the tubing getting ding, ding, ding ding you’re listening to the talking alternative network get in! Dahna duitz are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Hi, i’m ostomel role, and i’m sloan wainwright, where the host of the new thursday morning show the music power hour. Eleven a m. We’re gonna have fun. Shine the light on all aspects of music and its limitless healing possibilities. We’re gonna invite artists to share their songs and play live will be listening and talking about great music from yesterday to today, so you’re invited to share in our musical conversation. Your ears will be delighted with the sound of music and our voices. Join austin and sloan live thursdays at eleven a. M on talking alternative dot com. Yeah, you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Duitz durney i’m dana ostomel, ceo of deposit, a gift. And you’re listening to tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’ve got live listener love nashville, tennessee i don’t know if you’ve been with us before nashville. Welcome new york, new york and new york, new york couple people from right here in the city and los angeles, california. Welcome live listener love to all of you. We also have someone masked in the us there’s someone else at least one of the person in the u s maybe it’s, the national security agency. I don’t know, i can’t tell, but you’re out there live listener love to all of you moving out to asia. Always lots of loyal listeners in asia, none ing china and guangzhou china ni hao and also happy mid autumn festival hope. Hope you did you save me some moon cake? I would love for you to send me some moon cake, if you will if we’ll make the trip over malaysia, we can’t tell what city maybe it’s kuala lumpur maybe not. But malaysia live listeners love to you. Welcome. And seoul, korea anya haserot will have mohr. Lots of live listener love time for tony’s. Take two. Last week i had a client tell me planned e-giving saved our ass. It’s. Exactly what? They said, and save them from what in four of the past six years planned giving saved them from shortfalls in unrestricted giving unrestricted cash planned giving got them to goal in those four years, including, of course, the recession and that’s, because the vast majority of plan gif ts and you would expect at least seventy five percent sometimes as high as ninety percent of all your planned gift doesn’t matter what kind of mission you have to be bequests and most bequests are unrestricted gif ts so that as you build your program, you gettinto lots of wills, and i’m just talking about will bequests in will’s not any of the other other many types of plant gifts just talking about wills as you get into more and more of those. The fact is that people pass away irrespective of the state of the economy, whether we’re in a recession, whether stock market is high or low, people pass away, and those requests that are in those people’s estates represent a lot of unrestricted cash for you. Not that you khun budget for it that’s unwise. But as your plan giving program grows, there will be revenue from bequests each year. And i say a lot more about that. On my blogged at tony martignetti dot com. Also going to be at bebe con on september thirtieth, this’s the blackbaud conference it’s at the gaylord convention center in maryland. And we’re running some some contests while i’m there. I’m going to be there interviewing for this show, doing about fifteen or so interviews. And i’ll be on stage on the exhibit floor, but they set up stage for for metoo podcast from and the contests are that i’m giving away two hours of consulting teo either people who were at the show or who are on twitter that day so you can tweet live that day, september thirtieth, and you have a chance to win or if you’re at bebe con, you can you can enter to win and there’s more about all of that on my block. Also a tony martignetti dot com there’s, a post devoted to be become twenty thirteen that’s coming up on the thirtieth of september and that is tony’s take two for friday, twentieth of september thirty seventh show of the year maria simple she’s in the studio today she’s the prospect find her you know, her he’s, a trainer and speaker on prospect research fact she spoke today we’re going to talk a little about that. Her website is the prospect finder dot com her book is panning for gold. Find your best donor prospects now she’s our doi end of dirt, cheap and free you could follow maria on twitter at maria simple welcome to the studio. Maria. Hey, tony. Good to see you in person. I know it’s. A pleasure, it’s a it’s. A bigger pleasure than usual to have you here. Have you hear? Face-to-face you did a little speaking gig today. What was that in the city? Ah, yes. So wilmington trust hosted some of their non-profit clients and colleagues and had an opportunity teo, to do a topic on prospecting on a shoestring budget. So it was a lot of fun as our die. And you’re the perfect person for that. What was what were what was a question? That you got any common questions or ah one that you hear a lot that you want to share? Probably one of the common questions was just sort of related to, you know, what are the resource is that i typically would go to and is it worth paying for? The resource is, you know, people always want to know is always good to just use the free resource is or sometimes should we be paying for them? So and i had a chance to to talk about the new foundation center’s project that we have, which we’re talking about today, so that was good that we were able, teo dovetail that in you and i have talked a lot about free resource is, of course, as i said, you know, a couple times you are doing end of dirt cheap and free. Um, do you think you’re do you think you’re really hindering your program if you’re only relying on free resource is well, what i think you’re doing is you’re probably spending a lot more time staff time on trying to hit a number of different research resource is, whereas ah lot of the fee based resource is will compile a bunch of things under one and so on what you’re what you’re not spending on resource is you probably are expending on staff time unless you have a volunteer doing your research. Ok, ok, go let’s, talk about our some of new sources that with news sources that we talked about and then well, later on, we’ll get to the new source. The foundation center thing. Yeah. You have advice about newspapers? Yeah. So of course, one of the things that you want to be able to do is sort of keep on top of what’s going on in your local economy what the local business owners air doing, for example, who the movers and shakers are. And then certainly, as you’re doing reactive research, that means you have a name of somebody you’re looking to research. One of the sources that you definitely want to check out is news sources. So i generally will try and check out newsreel ated to where they live a cz their primary residents. But if they’re snowbirds, so for example, if you have somebody from the northeast and they spend their winters in palm beach, eso you would want to be able to check out well, what are they doing? Philanthropic lee there. Okay, cool. So you know where they’re where they’re located in you? Then you look for local news sources. You just searched the newspapers in the vicinity. Is that well? That that’s. Definitely one way of doing it. I love using, as you know, libraries. And, you know, i’m a huge proponent of our library systems. And so, in fact, if you did have that snowbird down in palm beach, i you can go to the palm beach county library. And they have magazines and newspapers that you, khun research online for free. So they will include the local re newspapers for palm beach area. And even if you’re not a cardholder, they will give you a temporary pass. A research passed to be able to research their sources. So it’s fantastic. You can get that online. Yeah. Get the free research past online and be anywhere in the country. I believe so. Yes. So you just there’s. Ah, button. You click and you just request it. And so it would give you access to those newspapers if that’s indeed where your prospect was living for temporarily do you have ah, earl for since ah, approaching winter and palm beach is a popular snowbird place. Yeah, well, it’s, palm beach county, p, b, c library dot or ge is thie site. You want to go to bbc library dot or ge? Okay, you could put that on facebook page for sure. Okay. Um, okay, interesting. So, what is the advantage to going to the library? Is it because they they’re aggregating versus trying to find the sources on your own? So going through a library resource is going to mean you’re not going to pay for the full article. So very often, if you go directly to a news source, what they’ll allow you to do in a lot of cases is to do the search to come up with a set of list of search results, but then you won’t be able to see the full article without paying for it. Whereas if you go through the portal of a library, you typically will be standing are doi in-kind now it zoya i said, like, five times already today, we’re not even family it’s, very smiths. Incredible. Well, you know, your shoe string budget, right? So you’ve got to be able teo to figure out a way to access news sources and not paying arm and a leg for them. Go through the library so you don’t pay for your feet. Content? Excellent. I’m definitely include that we i post takeaways now on facebook page on dh. That will definitely be one of the one. The bullets. Excellent one. Is there something else you want to add about this? No. Okay. Okay. Um, now, are there fee based places that you can find local news sources? Yeah. I mean, there are and i would say for for the most part, though, non-profits that are doing research on more localized basis unless you’re really looking to get into international research, right? Sew something like it used to be called dow jones interactive. I can’t remember what they switched teo, but that news source, for example, will be able to scan newspapers worldwide. And in case you do have, i could see you in more of a college or university setting where they may have alum living all over the world, and they have to be able to see what’s going on in those sources. But i think for the for the average, your audience, the other ninety five percent who might be more local you khun definitely do that. Of course, you’re your listeners who are overseas would want to take advantage of some of that, so you can definitely google news resource is fee based news resource is, and you’ll come up with some alternatives to looking on a paid basis. Okay, now we have just about a minute before we go away for a couple minutes. This presumes that you confined addresses on people or at least if not an address a locale. Teo, how do you how do you find those locales? What do you get that well in? In a lot of cases, when i’m doing my research, for example, i will be told that somebody might have a second home somewhere else. So during the course of my research, i know to be looking for that piece of information. S oh, if i know they have a secondary piece of property in another state, i’m always trying to find out what the news sources are and checking out what they might be doing. Philanthropic lee. Sometimes they’re participating in golf tournaments, galas and so forth, so it’s, kind of good to know what they’re supporting when they are doing their their snow birding, right, okay, because you can help find the vicinity. All right, we’re gonna have a lot more on this on dove course. Also, maria’s, sixty second style. Stop at the very end, so hang with us. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Buy-in are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping countries. People be better business people. Have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. Time. Montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Dahna with the prospect finder maria simple, and we’re talking about news sources, and then we’re going to get to a new source shortly. Maria, this part of the value of this is if you find that someone works in a place that’s different than where they’re living, right, so then you’d want to be doing this local local news search in both places. Yeah, i think that would be very valuable, you know, especially when you’re talking about metropolitan areas where you’ve got people commuting on hour or more to get to work. S o they might be doing some philanthropic efforts in the locale where they work as opposed to where they live because they well, the commute is so long, so yeah, absolutely. The’s online research access cards that you can you can sometimes get. Do they have ah, limit to how long is that for a day pass? Or how does that work? Well, ahh, yeah. I mean, they all have different rules around them, so you would definitely check out with the individual library. But for the new sources that i typically will be searching and and that search is actually a lot of newspapers across the country i go through my local county library, i have my county library card. It has a bar code on the back of the card, and that barcode is what allows me the access to being able to search things like a pro quest, which is a new stand that’s available online and another one news bank, which is available online. So again there it’s it’s, searching across multiple newspapers across the country, but that’s that’s mostly in a situation where i i i’m not entirely sure where people might be residing elsewhere, but if i know where they are, then i will definitely go straight to that newspaper of the town where they’re spending other time. And you and i have talked about this before the value of having a local library card like you’re talking about. You use your local library? Absolutely. It gives you access. Yeah. You’re saying so? Yeah. Lots of sites that yeah, and you don’t even need to be, you know, on site at the library to do the research. You anywhere. You have an internet connection, you can be doing the research. So that may be money. Well spent just on a local library card. Knowing that you could get ah, access. Yeah, well, if it’s your local library card, you won’t have to spend any money at all. Yeah, yeah, yeah, so long stuff had one. But if you if you find that your your local or county library does not have a good card, another source to think about is your alma mater. Because sometimes your universities and colleges will allow you access. Teo to resource is online. And another alternative is you can buy a library card. Ah, if you if you live outside that county or region, some libraries will allow that to happen. So in the fees range hundred to two hundred dollars. Okay. And if and if it’s a place that’s. Ah, popular spot for your your prospects. That may be money well spent. Absolutely. Local library. Yeah. Excellent tip about, um, it’s. Amazing about your alma mater. Another way, another backdoor way. Teo, get library access. Yeah, right. Cool. All right, let’s, move to the foundation center. They have something called fbo. They’re calling fto free foundation directory online on dh. You checked it out for us? Yeah, i did. So, of course. Staying with our sort of library theme, right? So foundation center, very specific library on doing donorsearch research on dh, whether you’re doing the search at the foundation centers library in manhattan or and any of their cooperating collections, you may be aware that they have fto foundation directory online, which is a fee based resource that they make available for free through the library’s. However, what they have now done is they have basically taken a portion of that data base and made it available, or certain search functionalities across the board available for free through a link on their website. So you don’t even have to be in one of the co operating collections. Okay, excellent. And what does it? What does it offer this this limited free service, right? So i did. I definitely found, you know, some some pros and cons. So what do you want? First, the pros of the calls start with the positive. Okay? Absolutely. Okay, pro it’s free, right? So i have to promote that for sure. Andi, i think i find that it was good for both reactive and proactive research. And we’ve talked about that before. Reactive. You’ve got the name of a prospect? Proactive, you’re just in there trying to find some new prospects. I loved the fact that you had access to researching the entire nine nineties. The text of irs nine nine text searchable its search text of the nineties is searchable, right? Do you know if guidestar they’re popular nine ninety site, do they do they have that feature? I think they might have that feature as well, but this is the first time that i’m seeing foundation center making that available for free. That’s, right? Well, oh, yeah, i don’t know if guides to write, i may be confusing. I don’t know if guide star has nine nineties of foundations yeah, they d’oh, d’oh, d’oh, andi. Also, what you can do is you’re getting a glimpse of the fto product, right? So you’re getting a glimpse says to because you’ll get a certain amount of data that you can get for free and then as soon as you go to try and do a little bit more, it’ll say, well, you need to be a subscriber, so at least it gets you in the mode of understanding how to use the tool and do the research and then and then, you know, you could decide either subscribe on a monthly basis and at what? They have various levels of subscription, or go to the local cooperating collection and used their source there. And then you can use it for free. Absolutely. Latto one of cooperating court. Cooperating collections. Yeah. So those were the real pros that i found let’s. Give the what’s the girl for this. Ok, so the girl for this is fbo dot foundation, center, dot or ge? Okay, i do love thee, even even if it’s even if it’s available elsewhere. I just i love that keyword search of nine nineties. Yeah, it’s. Really, really cool, eh? So what i did was i did a little test of the keyword search. First of all, just like you would be doing a keyword search on google if you had a phrase you want to make sure that you’re putting quotation marks around anything that’s a phrase, right? So i was testing it for the phrase foster care i was trying to see. Well, who are the funders that might come up funding foster care and you can also narrow it down by st. Right? So i did a search for who was funding foster care in new york and came up with a bunch of foundation hits, so then i thought, well, let me see if this really worked. So i went into a few of the nine nineties, and i searched for the word foster inside of thie nine ninety and lo and behold, there it wass and it appeared as one of the grants that they had made was for funding foster care. Excellent. Excellent. Now, if you don’t use those quotes, you might end up with it’s on foster brooks. So the comedian who used to play a drunk, actually what i what what had happened was i did the search without putting the quotes first, and i got a ton of hits and i couldn’t believe it and i thought, something’s wrong here what had happened was they picked up on embedded in the nine nineties companies that were foundations that were invested in foster wheeler as a company. Ok, so i thought, okay, so i’ve got to refine it further and once i re ran the search with foster care in quotes, then i got better hits. Excellent love this love the keyword search. Okay, yeah, that was great anymore. You want to say positive before we get to the what you saw some problems with? Um, no. Go ahead. Okay, good. What do you have on the downside? So, on the downside, you know, some fields are definitely fi base to research. And i think the biggest downside of all was that you could not export the results so you could not come up with that list of foundation hits and and download them to a spreadsheet to have something that might be very share a bowl with other staff for board members before you decided to do this research and behind the food that’s behind the export. So you have to take notes? Yeah. Yeah. You have to take notes, or yeah, you could construct the spreadsheet yourself. I’m sure, but okay. I just kind of found that that might be a con, but as i said, you know, you can definitely go on a monthly subscription or use it at the cooperating collection. Okay. That the only downsides? Yeah. I found more pros and cons. Actual. Excellent. All right, cool. I was like, i love the foundation. Center for people here in new york. It’s it’s right on the lower fifth of it, i think it’s at sixteenth street and at all the cooperating collections. Not only is it free to use, but they you are very generous with showing you teaching you how to use it. The librarians are there and they will spend as much time as it takes. And it really doesn’t take much because it’s a pretty simple system i ous i recall teo teo use but the librarians are very generous with their help. Yeah, absolutely, absolutely. Okay, cool. Let’s. See we we’re going. We’re going toe, i guess. Wrap up. I asked er i asked you for a sixty second style stop. What do you s o? We’re opening this too. You know things like travel, leisure, food, what’s your just sixty seconds what’s your what’s, your what’s, your style stuff. So i decided to pick the topic of travel for and there’s a fabulous website and mobile app called hop stop dot com and i had to use it today. As a matter of fact, i need to figure out how to get from my location in midtown to your studio here and it told me exactly which subways i had to take to get here. Is it only for public transportation hub? Stop no, you can. You can select to be told how to walk to a location, how taxi and approximately what the taxi might cost. So you you’ve got a lot of different options that you can play around with and yeah, it’s pretty cool. I see people using hop stop dot com. My objection is that when they’re new york, if you live in new york, if you live in new york, i don’t think you should be using hop. Stop. I think that’s cheating. I think you’re supposed to use the other tools that are more difficult. It’s just it’s a part of living in new york. You’re supposed to do it the hard way, not the hop stop where you’re supposed to get the apse that the empty a the metropolitan transit authority has, you know, they use a map that from the subway token from the token booth, if you have to go paper, i just object to residents using hop stop. But if you’re visiting someplace hop stop is really cool. Perfect. We got some last minute live listener look that maura liberation last minute live listener love japan! I never want to leave you out tokyo, sugisaki, yokohama sutjipto or sugito? I’m not sure konichiwa to our japanese live listeners where’s, north carolina today in the u s didn’t north carolina and check in miree simple, thank you very much for coming to the studio. Thanks for having me always it’s a special pleasure today, as i said, you can find maria on twitter at maria simple and you’ll find her blawg her sight at the prospect finder dot com next week. I have part two of the non-profit outcomes toolbox, no more berating my eagle scout project, but we do mention easy bake ovens, so you wantto you want to listen for that? Remember easy bake ovens. I’m going way back like foster brooks references from thirty years ago, you got to keep up. Also, amy sample ward is back, our social media contributor and the ceo of non-profit technology network has tips for optimizing your profiles to boost your search results and stay consistent with your mission, and she will have a sixty second style stop. I’m interested in what you think about that little nufer teacher, do you have a sixty second style stop? I’ll i’ll share yours if you got one you want to use, you hit me on facebook or or twitter or even on my block does contact page. Let me know what you think. I’ll let you know if you have one you want to share over nine thousand leaders, fundraisers and board members of small and midsize charities, the other ninety five percent listen each week you know how to reach me. If you want to talk about sponsoring the show and we have a sponsor starting in october, be welcoming them. Our creative producers claire meyerhoff sam legal, which is our line producer, shows social media is by deborah askanase of community organizer two point oh, and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules our music. Listen to that bye, scott stein. I hope you’ll be with me next friday one to two p m eastern. I’ll be here in the studio. I hope you will be listening. Live one, two, two eastern at talking alternative dot com e-giving didn’t think that shooting the good ending. You’re listening to the talking alternative network, waiting to get a drink. Cubine are you a female entrepreneur? Ready to break through? Join us at sixty body sassy sol, where women are empowered to ask one received what they truly want in love, life and business. Tune in thursday said. Known eastern time to learn timpson. Juicy secrets from inspiring women and men who, there to define their success, get inspired, stay motivated and defying your version of giant success with sexy body sake. Sold every thursday ad men in new york times on talking alternative that calms. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way. Look forward to serving you. You’re listening to talking alternative network at www dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti athlete named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication. And the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office needs better leadership? Customer service sales or maybe better writing are speaking skills. Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com that’s improving communications, dot com improve your professional environment. Be more effective, be happier. And make more money. Improving communications. That’s. The answer. Talking dot com. Hyre

122: Candidates For Causes & Computers Crash – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Robert Egger, president of cForward

Scott Koegler, editor of Nonprofit Technology News

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

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Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host on december twenty first. Oh, i very much hope that you were with me last week. It would cause me pain if i learned that you missed get engaged. Three amy sample ward is our social media scientist. She continued her siri’s on online engagement with gold setting. How do you know if your engagement strategies are successful? We’ll talk about identifying goal areas directly related to your mission and assigning metrics. That is what we talked about. I need an intern here, so edit this copy. Amy is a membership director for the non-profit technology network and ten, and she contributes to stanford social innovation review. Also, we had dutiful documentation. Jean takagi and emily chan are legal contributors, explained the rules from my rs on what should be in all those acknowledgement letters that you send for two thousand twelve gif ts this week, candidates for causes robert eggers, president of sea forward working to rally candidates around non-profit platforms he and i will discuss how to assess those candidates in your local races and getting the non-profit agenda before them and how to support the candidates who step up also computers crash scott koegler, the editor of non-profit technology news and our monthly tech contributor, reminds us that technology can let us down. Your computer hardware will only last so long, so you should have a plan for replacing it. To avoid a crisis, i’ll talk to this former chief ah what’s the eye for, um information officer seo about the hardware lifecycle budgeting, training and planning damegreene eden intern also between the guests on tony’s take to my block this week is i am grateful and i’ll tell you what i’m grateful for. If you’re on twitter, you khun, join us, the hashtag there is non-profit radio use that hashtag wildly and it’s my pleasure now to welcome robert egger. He is the founder and president of sea forward on advocacy organization that rallies employees of non-profits to educate candidates about the economic role that non-profits play in every community and to support candidates who have detailed plans to strengthen the economy that includes non-profits and you’ll find they’re site at sea. The letter c forward dot org’s robert is also president of d c central kitchen, where food donated by hospitality businesses and farms, is used to fuel a culinary arts job training program. The kitchen is a ten million dollars a year self sustaining social enterprise. Since nineteen eighty nine, it has produced over twenty six million meals and helped a thousand men and women gain full time employment. In twenty thirteen, robert will open l a kitchen on the same model it’s. My pleasure to welcome robert egger. Robert. Welcome. Thanks, tony. Happy holidays. Thank you. Happy holidays to you, it’s. A pleasure to have you on pleasure to be here. What is the non-profit role in the economy? Why should why should candidates be paying attention? Well, it’s a bold statement that i believe that there is no profit without non-profits theirs. If you think about what community can attract a business or new new visits or young couples stay and maybe have a have a family, if they don’t have arts and culture, they don’t have communities of faith, education, healthcare, clean environment. You know, those are the things that the non profit sector produces. So you know what we’re saying is, look, there’s, a new civic mathematics that must come and play if the economic recovery is truly going to work. And that’s saying, in effect, that both non-profits and four profits are equally essential toe every city’s, every communities, every state’s, every country’s vibrancy. So what we need to do is elect people who understand that so we can move beyond the kind of old notion that dot com businesses drive the economy will dot or charities just do a good deed, very good, no profit without non-profit now the non-profit sector is about ten percent of our gross domestic product is that do you agree with that? Yeah, it is an effect, but, you know, if you really drill down a bit, which you’re looking at is in most cities non-profits are one of the top three employers, and so for example, in cities like new york, they’re the number one employer in the city now beyond that and again, i really want to emphasize a lot of people will say, well, that’s, not good, because the non-profits don’t create value, they don’t create revenue there and see what we’ve done is we kind of confused the word non-profit with not creating anything of value, but let’s, let’s, cool down just on the taxes i’ve seen this a lot recently where people say, non-profits don’t pay tax xero and i tell you what, brother, try and run and city without the payroll taxes non-profits pay every year and more importantly, trying to run a city where the city’s tax dollars have to go to make up for what non-profits do often times with money that’s brought in from outside the city. You know, we’re one of the major sources of outside investment in every single community. So a smart mayor we’ll understand there’s a tremendous potential to, for example, double the amount of money coming into the city or the state via the non-profit sector. By helping us, you know, say, in effect, what do you need? Can i help you develop partnerships? Can i help you? Uh get grants? What can i do to help you? Being the kind of resource is into this city or state that will help it grow and employ more people. How big is the non-profit sector where you are in washington d c we’re twenty six percent of the employment base in washington d c so when we look at the mayor’s race, for example, in two thousand fourteen were heavily democratic city. So the spring democratic primaries pretty much how we choose the mayor. So the goal is to say to the non profit sector, look, you know, it’s important, and i mean, many of you have historically kind of rallied around your individual cause, you know, housing the arts, aids, whatever and that’s important. But there are strategic moments when you need to let go of your immediate issue and stand together for the all boats must rise questions that i think are essential to be asking candidate. But again, what we’re trying to say to any candidate and and all the competitors, particularly when you look at a place like new york city next year where there’s a mayor’s race and his mayor bloomberg steps down there’s gonna be a lot of competition. We want to say to all the candidates, you know, whether you understand it or not, this is probably one of the biggest special interest groups in america that has yet to be courted and that there is a there is a potential political strategy here and an opportunity for candidate to who again can understand this new civic mathematics and again reach out to the sector and say, look, i’m moving beyond the kind of, you know, flowery rhetoric of i heart. Non-profits yeah, and i’ve got a detailed plan for if you will like me how i will partner with you from day one, you want to do social enterprise, you wanted micro credit to create jobs, man, i am your best friend, you know, you want to use volunteers, particularly our elders, who is very essential that they stay now have been engaged, you want to use those elders and meaningful voluntary activity, bring it on, you know, i’m one of those people who’s who i respect and understand the process, but i’m there’s the fierce urgency of now and frankly, after twenty five years in this business, i’m kind of bored of educating candidate yeah, i sense of a sense of frustration. Well, yeah, i mean, i feed poor people. I work in the basement of the biggest shelter in american i know what charity can do, but i know what we can do and the notion that somehow we’re supposed to keep moving on where we’re has to. Do mohr form or with less and be quiet about it now again, please understand, when i talk about frustration and not being quiet, i’m not talking about being belligerent are throwing bombs or being confrontational. I’m proposing, you know, an economic logic that says, in effect, just stop and listen, you know non-profits aren’t they actually create tremendous value? They are essential to any economic recovery, right? I want to talk about the recovery. Yes, right. And you’d be smart to really embrace us as partners. Okay? I love that. I like that a lot. No, no profit without non-profit and particularly in light of states trying to recover from several years of bad budgets. Do you have a sense of the role of non-profits in california? Bunny chance. I’m sort of putting on the spot. Do you know tremendously? I mean, look at san francisco and l a will both have mayor’s races next year, right? And no matter where you go, but do you have a sense of the role of the non-profits play in the state generally or in any cities in california? Oh, i mean again, you can’t go to any city in which there. Is not the non-profit sector isn’t one of the predominant employers. Okay, so that’s true in the central valley? Look, att cities like fresno, stockton, baker’s field, all of them killing bankruptcy. Yeah, this is the perfect opportunity when you, when you start to think about who’s going to come in and be the mayor and pull a city out of bankruptcy, this is an ideal time for candidates to kind of almost break free of the old kind of cemented notion of how you build the economy, which is let’s, attract a big factory or a stadium or, you know, municipal bonds. What we’re suggesting is that non-profits particularly those like the d c central kitchen. You know, we have multiple businesses that employ graduates of our program that might be going back to prison. We pay a living wage we and reinvest all our profit back in the community. Frankly, we’re the best friend any mayor has. You know, business is like the kitchen, and they should be aggressively trying to court and help mohr kind of transition from the traditional kind of service model into the empowerment model on. So i think that my my thing is you’ve got to elect people who understand that and again on day one, say, let’s work hand in hand. Business government non-profits altogether to rebuild the city in the state, even before day one. We want to get candidates adding the non-profit agenda to their platforms. And right now we’re going to take a break, robert. But we’re gonna have a chance, plenty time to talk about how to get their attention. What to do once you’ve gotten their attention and then using platform like, see forward how to endorse them. So i hope everybody’s going to stay with us and robert eckert certainly will, too. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam lebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership, customer service sales or maybe better writing are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stopped by one of our public classes or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier and make more money improving communications. That’s the answer buy-in hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business, why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome back to big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m sorry, i can’t send out live listener love today because this show is pre recorded. It’s ah it’s tuesday before the friday that you’re going to be listening on the twenty first, so grateful for all the live listeners, but i can’t send you love city by city the way i like to do robert eggers, egger is with me and we’re talking about candidates for causes. Robert, how can we start to get the politicians attention? We’re talking about candidates now candidates, how can we get a candidate’s attention? Well, you know what what’s great is one of the vehicles we have, and this is the strategy were employing is saying, look, it’s it’s very it’s, almost impossible for organizations to be political themselves again. That’s part of our five a one c three charter ratification can’t before against any candidate but the private citizens who work at those non-profits can and that’s our strategy and see forward saying there’s ten point four million non-profit employees now what’s exciting is you look at that thing’s like twitter and facebook there isn’t a candidate out there who doesn’t have a facebook page or twitter account, and there isn’t a candidate out there who doesn’t have a staff person monitoring those accounts every single day. So in effect, what you have is the press conference that never ends. You know what used to be that moment where they could say no more questions, no more questions, and they were gone? Or if you might have had that opportunity at a press conference or a session to say mr cain and mrs kennedy, what do you think of the non profit sector? How would you partner? They could say, oh, i love the non-profit sector, the backbone of the community, thank you very much and split. Now we have the potential tohave literally if you think about it in cities like new york, l a, minneapolis, seattle ten thousand people every single day, relentlessly asking through facebook and twitter, what is your plan? We are one tenth of the economy, you know, one tenth of the workforce we channel the energy of millions of volunteers were major sources about sent investment what’s your plan and i think that that’s, the potential we have that we’ve never had before and that’s the seat forward strategy what we do, we’re almost like kiva in that we identify candidates all throughout the country. Last year we identified fifty three on sixty different candidates from, you know, races from mayor’s races down to city council. We’re going, we’re gonna have time to talk that way identified people who come from the nonprofit sector, okay, people, just like you and me, people who sweat out payroll there dedicated to make their community betters and now they’re standing up and running for office. And if they’re elected, they’re the kind of people who might stand up a city council member member meeting state legislature and eventually even you know, the house in the senate and really say, wait, wait, wait. I know this piece of legislation you think is important and will work. I work in the nonprofit sector. I come from the sector. I let me explain to you how it really works. Okay? This is essential. Not just for us is a sector, but for our country. Brother, you know what we’re saying is, look, will identify all these people and then you can come to our website and then you is private. Citizens khun go through our site to their website and give them directly. Okay, robert were saying little your you live in miami, you have you have a vested interest in helping somebody get elected in minneapolis, right? Robert? We’re gonna have a chance to talk about see forward and the success you’ve seen so far. Um, the only caveat that i want to add it just sorta amplify what you suggested that on. We’ve had a show about this with jean takagi and emily chan are legal contributors. When people are doing this sort of lobbying for the for the sector, they have to be careful what account they’re using. They shouldn’t be using their their company account, maybe they shouldn’t even be doing it on, you know, on the charities time. So just a just a caveat that politicking is important, but you have to be cautious about when you’re when you’re doing it on whose account you’re using and on what time that’s all and really, i’m really glad you brought that up, tony, because, you know, this is something you have to be wildly aware, like, for example, i’m at home, i’m using my private line. Right now, i can’t you know, i don’t do company time when i do stuff it’s, my private email or private twitter accounts that i do this work on or my c forward account. But that is it very important. Caveat you bring up well, yeah, you’re right, private citizens. But it has to be on your old time with your own account. Okay, alright, enough said. And we have and listeners could go back teo, show about politicking with gene and emily and listen to that for a lot more detail on what’s permitted and what’s not, um all right, so you want a you want a grassroots campaign to get the candidate’s attention? What kinds of? Well, i guess you’ve already you sort of laid out all the talking points. You just you wantto be able to specify what the impact of and the value for of charities is in your your local community in your state, you want to be ableto throw some stats in them at them and get their attention that way. But, you know, we also have an ask, you know, we’re making a point again. No profits without non-profits, but even if we elect a very smart candidate, you know, he or she on day one is going to be pulled fifty different directions. So what we’re proposing is, if you really understand its and particularly the role we play in attracting outside investment through grants or contracts, then why don’t you appoint a dedicated point person? For example, connecticut’s governor, governor malloy has a dedicated non-profit liaise on, and mayors in denver and los angeles have a dedicated staff person. And, for example, in denver, a very small office there, the office of strategic partnership has brought in almost fifty a million dollars in four years into the city from outside the city. New money? Uh, so again, that idea of a dedicated point person we think, is very strategic. And, you know, what we’re looking for is the kind of unifying principle for the sector that, again, we’re a very diverse group of people. We have a million different missions and sometimes their counter, but again, my bag is, you know, what we need to do is at the strategic moment and if i can a little, you know, illustrate a second, i always say, for example, tony, you and i have to have dry cleaners were right across the street, and we hate each other, you know we’d love to see each other’s business fail, but if somebody comes into town and wants to regulate its small business in a way that might impact our businesses, we might not drive down together, but we’d end up in the chamber or the board of trade, and we’d be we put aside our differences for a moment because we have a shared interest and that’s the thing that non-profit sector is never embraced, that idea of strategic moment in which we have shared interests well, there are in that election time. Yeah, that while there are coalitions like independent sector that try to bring the try to bring the sector together, especially now, i see that, you know, they’re very active around the deficit reduction and fiscal cliff discussions. So but those air, those air national coalitions and, you know, i think the broader you get, the more i guess, the more general and vague your talking points are in your and your calls for action are i would like to see it on the local level. Mohr yeah, i agree, and that’s why we’re focusing on the local level, you know, eventually we think that, you know, eventually we want to see presidential candidates openly discussed this i’ll be honest with you. I was really shocked that neither governor romney nor president obama and, by the way, the first president who got his first job in a non-profit neither mentioned philanthropy, neither mentioned the non-profits and again, the third biggest employer in america and each talked vigorously about manufacturing, for example, yet we are only percentage points away from employing the same number of people in america is manufacturing. Okay, so let me let’s talk more about some of the the actor calls to action, so so we’d be asking for a dedicated point person for the charity for the community forward is after now, okay, one example and i’m not trying to say by our product as much as we are one breakthrough, i believe idea, but we are hopefully the beginning of many different strategies to get candidates on par with us. Ok, but what other calls to action now? We would be be asking candidates teo to embrace well, i’m a big believer in social enterprise and micro. Credit and you know the idea, for example, it’s one thing to have a really great domestic violence shelter in your town fully funded, well, run, but ultimately those women gotta leave and ultimately, you know, but tragically, many women who come in or have no credit history and oftentimes very difficult time getting a job. So imagine, you know, a flip from the service model and saying, in effect, okay, how can we scream, help them create their own businesses and again think about we’ve raised an entire generation doing service, so i’d like to see a mayor who looks at all the universities in the town and sees, you know, school system bursting with a generation raised doing service who are now in the business school, who might come down and help a domestic violence shelter, develop business plans and demerol might say, i love this idea. So if you develop a a, um micro credit program, the city will match it dollar for dollar and i’m going to let three other partners with us so that every buck of private citizens put in will match in three, two, one let’s get people working again, i think that’s. What’s missing is seeing the non-profit sector is a potential job creator. Okay, do you have another example of ah call to action that we be insisting our candidates do before we’re going to endorse them because they’re they’re pro charity community? Yeah, i’m a big believer a we need great new metrics. I mean, for heaven’s sakes, you know, most cities have know idea you can’t ask a mayor how many non-profits today do you have in your community how much payroll taxes do they pay? How much money do they bring is so in depth analysis is essential, but another thing i’m really interested in is the contract process. I mean, we need mayors and city council members that they in fact, we want to get more of these non-profits of potential do contracts with the city because, again, they they’re motivated to pay a good wage, and they re invest their money back in the community versus making individual profit. But to do that, we have to lower the bar a little bit to help more people in, and we also very much need to expedite the reimbursement process between city and their contractors. So that non-profit organizations don’t go broke waiting to get get paid for services rendered, okay? So there’s a place where the corporate interests and the charity interests are overlapped you bet every everybody has list in that i was i was really impressed. Governor schwarzenegger appointed one of the first governors to appoint a volunteer coordinator on his cabinet, saying, in effect, look, we’ve got, you know, millions of older people but millions of younger people for whom service it’s part of their lifestyle now, and we’ve got a state that very well might have, you know, a natural disaster somewhere in the future. I don’t wanna wait until after the fact to try and get things coordinated let’s have a plan now, and i think that was a very, very intelligent way to look at the human capital that the charity, the charitable sector sector kind of channels volunteerism as a dynamic part of the city’s future of the state future. Now that we’ve identified candidates who have a pro non-profit agenda on there as part of their platform, how can we start to show our support? Well, i think is to get a private citizens you can, you can contribute. You know, i’m a big believer that even though we heard a lot about, you know, the billions a million spent in these campaigns that, you know, down the road, you know, those those the campaign will be more more driven by new media, which is free and pervasive. So i think that, you know, spreading the word about candidates contributing but also getting out there working for him, but what i’m interested again, it is not only backing people who come from the nonprofit sector but actually helping people who are in the sector now realize, you know, maybe you should run, you know, maybe the city, the state needs you, you’ve been a tremendous, tremendous supporter of this community step up and take another another step up on the chain, but again, what i’m trying to say to the non-profit sectors we gotta win, we have to support those men and women, our peers who step out and say, i’m willing to step up and take, you know, take a, you know, a bigger bucket of water on my shoulder for the larger you no benefit of the sector in our community, we need to get behind them. Okay, really, you know, support them in every way we can understood. And there there’s the role of sea forward. So let’s, take a couple minutes, talk about, see forward you you identified, i counted sixty one, endorsed sixty one candidates who had a non-profit friendly platform. Eight of them see forward specifically endorsed. And there were thirty five winners out of those sixty one. Yeah. And in fact, what makes it interesting is we have people throughout the sector nominate people. Look, you know, we’re trying our best here, but, you know, there’s not a whole lot of money in this. I’ll tell you, tony, i mean, it’s not like that, you know, the czechs air flowing in. We’re not competing with any super pac. You’re nowhere. We want teo what we’re saying to the non-profit sectors throughout the country, if you know somebody who’s running, nominate him, put him up on our page, and what we’ll do is we’ll look for those candidates that we think really have a tremendous opportunity, but well, even if we don’t endorse them, we’re at least giving them exposure beyond the small town where they might be running for city council mayor. And we’re saying all the ten point, million, ten point, four million non-profit employees check out this site and do a little shopping, you know, look around and see if you see a candidate, did you think? Wow, you know, that person is again four states away and a little tiny town, but wow, that’s a tremendous opportunity. What a vision i’m going to give him twenty bucks. What the hat? You know, when you’re running for a city council race in a small town, you know, fifty bucks a hundred bucks that that could go a long way, so never underestimate what ten million one dollar bills khun due in the political process in america, to get people who think again understand the role we play, it will be champions, not just for us again don’t don’t don’t mistake what we’re doing is somehow, you know, just trying to preserve the cut of the pie for the nonprofit sector. What we want is intelligent people elected who understand the new civic mathematics of how community thrive and grow. Robert, you had mostly of most of candidates were local from the twenty twelve election cycle, but you did have three. At the national level and and also the governor of washington state among those thirty five winners. Yeah, again, we’re really looking actually the person who was hunting who was nominated, i don’t think our candidate for washington state won the governor’s race, but a way had a pretty good track record of candidates who eventually want some with our support and don’t get me wrong that we just endorse. We just said, xero candidates that we think a really strategic and smart, so it was like it, sam saying, for example, who was the first indian american elected to the state legislature in michigan? You know, he ran the state association, he was the mayor of east lansing prior, and he would also he has also done amazing work promoting social enterprise in the city of detroit. So these are the kind of people we think when that, you know, sam will be out the statehouse really advocating for, you know, again, the economic role that we play in helping a state like michigan, which is behind the eight ball. You know what? A lot of states are really struggling with big deficits, so what we don’t want is people who think, you know, wow, these non-profits air getting off, you know, with a field day they’re you know, they don’t pay taxes and there just, you know, sucking money out of the economy to do good deeds. We want people to understand no, no, no, no, make no mistake, there is no profit without non-profit robert, i’m gonna switch the focus to you personally. What is it that you love about this kind of advocacy and endorsement work? Well, you know, i’m a big believer in no waste, you know, i started the kitchen because i hated seen food being thrown away, and i volunteered one night to serve the poor and saw men and women standing outside in the rain, and i had worked in a business that needed employees, so my bag has always been i hate seeing things that are still have value but aren’t being used to their potential, and i believe the non-profit sector and our vote, our classic examples of a tremendous american asset that are not being utilized, you know, i just came along to the food we throw away and the people we value have tremendous potential, and i think we proved that here at the d c central kitchen, so i’m just following the logic model of don’t throw anything away, don’t waste anything, don’t undervalue anything just because of the traditional way we used it in the past, no profit without non-profit. Robert egger is founder and president of sea forward. You’ll find that at sea, the letter c forward, dot or ge robert, thank you so much for being a passionate, enthusiastic guests, thanks so much pleasure, tony. Man, i wish you well, my brother. Thank you, robert. Now we’ll take a break, and when we retired, it’s tony’s, take two, and i’m going to explain what i’m grateful for. Stay with me. You didn’t think that shooting getting ding, ding, ding, ding, you’re listening to the talking alternate network, get in. Nothing. Cubine hi, i’m donna and i’m done were certified mediators, and i am a family and couples licensed therapists and author of please don’t buy me ice cream are show new beginnings is about helping you and your family recover financially and emotionally and start the beginning of your life. We’ll answer your questions on divorce, family court, co parenting, personal development, new relationships, blending families and more dahna and i will bring you to a place of empowerment and belief that even though marriages may end, families are forever join us every monday, starting september tenth at ten a m on talking alternative dot com are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications? Then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com way look forward to serving you! You’re listening to the talking alternative network. If you have big ideas and an average budget to tony martin, any non-profit radio we dio. I’m jonah helper, nari team in co founders of next-gen charity hi there, time for tony’s take to my block post this week is very simple. I am grateful there are a lot of people that i’m grateful to, and i list them in that post on the block, but among them is you because you are listening to the show. I hope you’re listening often. Some listeners are very new, just within the past few weeks or months, and there are about a hundred or so that have been around for the two years that i’ve been doing this more than two years, and i’m grateful to each of you. I’m grateful to you for listening to the show. For those of you who get my show alerts by email every every week each thursday, i’m grateful to you. Thank you for letting me into your inbox once a week. I’m grateful for your support for your support of the show for your listening to the show, however it is that you propagate the show if you tell other people about it, if your forwarding those weekly email lorts that you get, however you’re supporting the show, i’m grateful and i want to thank you very much and you’ll find. A little longer list of people who i have gratitude for on my block at tony martignetti dot com that is tony’s take two for friday, december twenty first, the fifty second show of the year and the last of the year. My pleasure to bring on scott koegler scott is the editor of non-profit technology news. You can follow him on twitter he’s at scott koegler. Scotty koegler welcome back. Hey, tony, good to talk with my pleasure. We’re talking about computers crash. So you mean hardware is not gonna last forever? Yeah. You know, i have to say that when i was a cia, we’ve spent a lot of time and lots and lots of money on replacements and lifecycle transitions and all that kind of thing that, um, just, you know, you have to do with computer systems. I kind of changed my opinion over time, but it really depends on the on the situation that you’re in. So, um, i guess that’s what we can kind of talk about. Yeah. Okay. Um, well, how has your how is your opinion? Evolved? The used to be that the computers that you used, uh, ran an operating system. And that really hasn’t changed a bit. Still operating systems all the windows variations, there’s, mac stuff and there’s all kinds of one expiry ations. And it used to be that the applications that ran on those operating systems and turn ran on those computers dependent very heavily on the technology itself. In other words, the processor you know how strong how fast, how many bits is the processor, thie amount of memory, the size and speed of the hard drive. All those things were really critical because as a cz we migrated from the nineties into the two thousands of now intothe ten pluses, uh, at application software has always become the larger files more complex required more more horsepower essentially to run them and some of that’s still true. If you’re heavily involved in graphics, video production or audio production, you still have to have all that. But what’s really changed the game is cloud computing. So why has that changed? You might ask. Oh, okay, well, you and i have talked about it, but go ahead. Why has changed? The reason is that you’re really not depending so much on the hardware or the operating system for that matter, you are dependent on the connection. Um, so, um, so if you have a good connection, if you have your applications and your data in the cloud, then really, you can you can use almost anything that will support a browser. So so that that’s that’s where my opinion has changed, however, there are still reasons to change your hardware. And so now that i’ve kind of cleared the air on that talk about okay, well, we still need to change it. Listeners well, and i i appreciate your honesty. Your opinion has evolved. That’s. Very interesting. So there are. So so you think it’s okay now to push the hardware beyond what used to be, i guess, a strict like three or four year replacement timetable again. It depends on your situation. If you are running your your applications in house, if you have a ah constituent management system that that keeps track of your all of your donors and your constituents, your activities and that’s running on a network inside your facility. Okay, then you absolutely do need to pay attention to the age of your equipment. Because again, the applications get more complex that require more horsepower. And not only that systems break hard drives breakdown and computers breakdown. So, you know, there is a kind of to get ahead of the curve of the breakdowns you want to pay a lot of attention to. How old is each piece of equipment? What is? What kind of applications is it running and, you know, what’s the best deal this week of this month that i could get on a replacement unit. Okay, but if you’re if you’re more more of your work is in the cloud, then it may be okay. Toe hold on to hardware longer because, as you said, all you really need is a hardware that will support ah, browser. Exactly. Right. Exactly. Right. Okay. There are a couple things that kind of still go against that. And that is the operating systems themselves. Uh, there’s there’s a surprising number of companies and organizations. They’re still running windows? Yes. On one that’s. A little dangerous, right? That think microsoft dropping dropping support for that. Yeah, even even is uninformed is i’m about technology. I remember seeing videos six or eight months ago that my panels of microsoft engineers explaining two customers. Why? They wouldn’t be supporting x p and why they should move to the next operating system. So why don’t you just give a little explanation is i think there are still a lot of officers running windows expert why is that risky? Um, you know, the departed that it runs and experience has been historically one of the most stable versions of of windows that’s been around, um, and, you know, people argue that back and forth, but the fact is that if you don’t have updates, it’s more vulnerable to being attacked by viruses and hackers, all those nasty things that happened to computer systems, and eventually khun lied to either just the computer system crashing your dying completely, becoming unusable four for the villains stealing your data and interrupt your important work that gets done on that computer and that’s what it means, if microsoft is no longer supporting the xb operating system, then they’re no longer issuing security updates and bug fixes, right? Absolutely right, exactly. Okay, um, if we’re going to be extending the lifetime of hardware, and that probably happens in a lot of officers even where there is locally run applications because because of budget reasons. What are some things we can do to reduce our risk of working with these older machines? The kind of going along with what i just talked about? What windows x p one of the things that can be done is upgrading the operating system to a supported operating system and in some cases, hyre. For instance, moving from expert to windows vista may not be a good thing because it took it, took more hardware, took more horsepower, increased cps, more memory, that kind of thing. And by the time you add your closer cpu and increase the memory in your in your aging computer, you may as well have brought a new computers now faces. You could buy a desktop computer for three, four hundred dollars now. And, uh so replacing parts in an agent computer could cost. You have tio two thirds of that amount. So is it really, really valid too? Spend that kind of money on something that marginal up too up today. One you could actually just get something brand new, and i kind of skipped the whole the whole update. Okay, you know, okay, but if we have to hold on. To equipment longer, back-up is one strategy right for minimizing our risk? Well, yes, certainly back-up is strategy that needs to be managed and done all the time, regardless of the age of the computer, even even on a brand new computer. Of course, you need to have back-up of your data, you need to have contingency plans for disaster and think about all the problems just happened up in the northeast with storms, a lot of those computers and the electricity they ran them and the infrastructure that supported all that just, uh, disappeared in some cases, aaron, certain certain cases became unusable for some period of time. So what? What’s the contingency? What would you do if that happened? Maybe maybe better. In-kind in line with the question is, what did people do when that happened just a few weeks ago? So back-up yes, absolutely. Back it up back your software up back. Your application’s up. But more important, we have a plan for what to do when something that happened and and so these back-up should be automatic, right? We’re past the days when there’s a there’s a manual process involved in backing up. That depends. Certainly. Back-up should be automatic, especially in smaller organizations. We’re where there’s a smaller amounts of data it’s relatively inexpensive, too, to set up on offline back-up for online back-up i guess that connects through the internet to some remote, uh, location where your data is stored and the software that runs those should run automatically on either the server that you’re running your software on or on the individual no computers that are running that because, you know, data could be candy and usually is everywhere could be on the local disc drive can be on a server somewhere, so but yes to your point back-up absolutely needs to be automatic, and even if it is automatic should be tested because, you know, a large percentage of backup systems fail, and we only find that out at the time we try to actually use back-up right? So you should be testing that you can recover data that you know how to do it and that it is recoverable a cz you mentioned, you know, non-profits that were affected by sandy, there were offices that were closed for weeks, i guess a lot of people then saw the value of being in the cloud, if if they weren’t or saudi, certainly, if they were, because then all they needed was ah, web browser, and they could grab that from there could have that from their laptop that was with them or from some, some other some of their source, but then all they needed to do was able to reach the clouds. Exactly, and i’ve talked with folks that essentially used their cell phones, smartphones as a cz computer systems. They’re pretty much very small computers, right? So if you have, uh, a connection through a cell tower, which is a lot of cases during the storm was pretty much the only thing if even that was available, and so you’re able to connect out two applications running on your smartphone, maybe not being conveniently operated as you would your desktop with your laptop, but you could get there, and you could do the least very important things you need to get done. Okay, so reducing risk back-up and testing the backups, the disaster recovery plan, virus protection, malware protection. And you also mentioned some having the right policies in your article, you mentioned having the right policies on on employees. Use of the of the technology right employees are, you know, the best thing that can happen to an organization that can also be some of the most difficult sources of disasters. I mean, people make mistakes, and some some other people, um, do bad things. So, uh, you want to be sure that you have ways to get around or have contingencies, just in case either mistakes or somebody just decide they want to be not so nice and actually damage, er, we’re steal our lead or get rid of data, some other ways. We’re going to take a break. We’re going to take a break, scott koegler stays with us, we’ll keep talking about a computer crash and had a avoid that. We’ll talk a little about timeline, planning and budgeting training to stay with us. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Buy-in have you ever considered consulting a road map when you feel you need help getting to your destination when the normal path seems blocked? A little help can come in handy when choosing an alternate route. Your natal chart is a map of your potentials. It addresses relationships, finance, business, health and, above all, creativity. Current planetary cycles can either support or challenge your objectives. I’m montgomery taylor. If you would like to explore the help of a private astrological reading, please contact me at monte at monty taylor dot. Com let’s monte m o nt y at monty taylor dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. All right, scott, for those who do want to put together ah timetable in a plan for their technology changes updates. Well, i obviously well, you start with timing, right? I mean, how do you how do you figure out when your stuff is goingto need to be replaced? Looking forward. Ah, good point. Tony. The first thing to do obviously is to know what you have. So you need to take an inventory of your systems. And when i say an inventory, i mean very specific. You know, what is the what is the product that you have is that the desktop is of the laptop what’s the cpu and what’s the speed of it what’s. The age of when was it purchased? What’s the operating system. All those very specific. Now, the attributes that go to make up a computer and there are there are several pieces of software that will actually go across the network and scan your network and deliver you a, uh, an inventory. Okay? Because that would include that includes all your peripheral, still your printers, right? And exactly servers. Certainly. Uh, do you happen to know any of the names of products that will do that for listeners. I don’t recall them. I actually wasn’t prepared to talk about that, right? That’s something that you want to go through, we can certainly schedule. Well, what do they mean? It’s an important playing it’s? Uh, for one way or another, you need to have a new inventory of what it is they have, and then go ahead and make an evaluation of what parts of that are at risk unnecessarily in terms of breaking but at risk in buy-in affecting your organization or some organizations if they’re running their applications in house, that risk is going to be c p u speed, hard drive viability that amount of memory in the operating system for organizations that are running cloudgood based applications it’s really going to be? What is the one of the operating systems and browsers now? It’s going to be far less critical? Obviously. And once you have that inventory and you’ve got the evaluation of what parts of your inventory are critical, then you need to evaluate basically, you take a guess. What do i think is going to change or or effect the things that we’re doing in our organization? Over? The next one year, two years, three years and from that then you can make a projected estimate of what should be replaced. So it’s kind of a multi step process, not necessarily easy and certainly not an infallible i guess because, you know, you really don’t know what’s going to break and you don’t know what kind of technology is going to come on in the future. Okay, but you’re looking at the oldest stuff first, right? Sure. That’s. The easy part. Last last in first out. Buy new stuff to replace it. Okay. Let’s help listeners out if they wanted to search for these the kind of software they were talking about that will scan your network. Like what? What keywords would you search for in google? I would try network inventory. Okay, good enough for budgeting now. How do you look forward into what the technology is going to cost? Two, three years from now, the the good laws of computer development are that the prices will go down. Capacities will go up. So if you look at what you what your expenses take the piece of equipment that you want to replace today and get a price for that? Just go to the market, you know, go online and find something that is an equivalent to today and start with that number. Because you know that one year from now, two years from now, three years from now, you’ll still be able to spend that amount of money in terms of you know, is there a product available that you could purchase for that amount of money? Okay, cesar, that amount of money in a year’s time, we’ll buy you more capacity. So for one thing, that gives you the ability to take a number and make a budget. Secondly, it kind of future proofs of purchases, so that in a year from now a cz as your requirements for capacity changed, the availability of the equipment will change as well. So i kind of go along the same path, so pick today’s numbers and use them in your budget. Okay. Interesting. I realize i said something incorrect a few minutes ago. I said when you were figuring out what what’s goingto be replaced to use a last in first out. But it should be that’s. That’s wrong. Should be first in first out. Essentially three. Oldest first, so first in first out, right? Oldest first. Okay, we have just a minute left. Scott, what other thoughts you want to leave people with about creating this thiss a short to medium term plan, medium term plan, i would say just get started on it, you know, one of those just like back-up if you keep thinking about it and kind of guessing on how it’s going to work, eventually it will be too late and you’ll never get there. All of a sudden it will be tomorrow, and the disaster is here and you’re not ready. So i would say the same thing with the, uh, with the replacement plan going on planet, even if it’s in perfect and by the way, it will be in perfect. Go ahead and figure out what it should be. Get something scratched on paper or put into the spreadsheet, and you can always add to it and refine it. But the most important thing is to get it in process, get it in place. Get your organization to understand what that what that processes and, uh, you know, get a few minds working on it because chances are that more people thinking about it better than one person thinking about scott koegler is the editor of non-profit technology news, which you’ll find it n p tech news dot com and on twitter he’s at scott koegler scott thank you very much. Happy holiday. Thanks, tony had theology. Thank you very much. Also, of course, my thanks, tio. Robert egger. Next week, there’s no show because of christmas. And if you celebrating christmas, you have my wishes for a joyous one. And hope you get spent a lot of time with family and friends. I’ll be back on friday, january fourth wave greg warner he’s, the president of marketsmart and he’s. Not going to talk about the future of planned gift marketing. I have a plea. Can you please rate and review the show in itunes? I know that you don’t have to go there to listen anymore. You go once you subscribe and then you never have to go backto itunes again. I realize that i’m asking you to make a special trip. Teo rate and review the show if you get value from it, if you like it, please do. Thank you very much. Wishing you good luck. The way performers do around the world, we are still in poland. I need another week, teo durney. I need two more weeks. January fourth will definitely be out of poland, but as the polish say, i wish you breaking of legs poem ania nuke poem, une anouk for the next two weeks, and i do promise, we’ll be out of poland. I think we’ll be in serbia on january fourth. Our creative producer is claire meyerhoff. Sam liebowitz is our line producer on this show. Social media is by regina walton of organic social media, the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules. I wish you a wonderful holidays, very happy, new year, and i hope you’ll be with me on friday, january fourth, one to two p, m eastern, or on the podcast a couple days thereafter. If you’re listening live, we’re always at talking alternative dot com. Hyre i didn’t think the shooting. Good ending. You’re listening to the talking, alternate network, get anything. Take it cubine hi, i’m donna and i’m done were certified mediators, and i am a family and couples licensed therapists and author of please don’t buy me ice cream. Our show new beginnings is about helping you and your family recover financially and emotionally and start the beginning of your life. We’ll answer your questions on divorce, family court, co parenting, personal development, new relationships, blending families and more dahna and i will bring you to a place of empowerment and belief that even though marriages may end, families are forever join us every monday, starting september tenth at ten a m on talking alternative dot com are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications? Then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com we look forward to serving you. You’re listening to talking alt-right network at www. Dot talking alternative dot com, now broadcasting twenty four hours a day. Oh, this is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio friday’s one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting are you fed up with talking points? Rhetoric everywhere you turn left or right? Spin ideology no reality, in fact, its ideology over intellect. No more it’s time. Join me, larry shop a neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven easter for the ivory tower radio in the ivory tower will discuss what’s important to you society, politics, business and family. It’s provocative talk for the realist and the skeptic who want to know what’s. Really going on? What does it mean? What can be done about it? So gain special access to the ivory tower. Listen to me, larry sharp, your neo-sage tuesday nights nine to eleven new york time go to ivory tower radio dot com for details. That’s ivory tower radio dot com everytime was a great place to visit for both entertainment and education listening tuesday nights nine to eleven. It will make you smarter. Talking. Hyre

097: Giving in 2011 & Video Talk With Scott – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Bob Evans, editorial board member of Giving USA

Rob Mitchell, CEO of Atlas of Giving

Scott Koegler, editor of Nonprofit Technology News 

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://tonymartignetti.com

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No. Hello and welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio for june twenty second twenty twelve we’re always talking about big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. I do hope you were with me last week, i’d be in distress if i learned that you had missed motivating your board for major e-giving to start from the fund-raising day conference earlier this month, jennifer herring had advice on motivating, working with and supporting your board to help them step up to fund-raising duties and revisiting your twenty twelve prospect plan. Maria simple, our prospect research contributor and the prospect finder, did a midyear checkin of her new year’s, her new year’s ideas on your twenty twelve prospect plan from our january sixth show, we talked about the cultivation events that you promised yourself you were going to set up and there’s google lorts you’ve been meaning to get to this week e-giving in two thousand eleven e-giving yusa and atlas of giving use very different methods to report charitable giving e-giving yusa is a survey that looks back the atlas is a forward looking prediction with e-giving yusa, boardmember and atlas givings ceo will contrast. The methods and hear what each has to say about last year’s e-giving numbers and we’ll look forward a little bit, too. Then video talk with scott are scott, our tech contributor scott koegler he’s, the editor of non-profit technology news. He’s going to share the buzz on video sites many that are free that help you make good looking videos to tell your stories between the guests on tony’s take two. If you’re going to give you got to take time off to be great at giving to others, you have to take care of yourself. That’s, my block this week and that’s what i’ll talk about. Use the hashtag non-profit radio to join the conversation with us on twitter, hashtag non-profit radio. Right now we take a break, and when we returned, my two guests will talk about giving in two thousand eleven, so stay with us. They didn’t think that shooting getting ding, ding, ding ding, you’re listening to the talking alternative network, waiting to get me anything. Cubine money, time, happiness, success, where’s your breakthrough join me, nora simpson, as i bring you real world tools for combining financial smarts with spiritual purpose. As a consultant to ceos, i’ve helped produce clear, measurable financial results while expanding integrity, passion and joy share my journey as we apply the science of achievement and the art of fulfillment to create breakthroughs for people across the world. The people of creation nation listened to norah simpson’s creation nation fridays at twelve noon eastern on talking alternative dot com. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three the conscious consultant helping huntress people be better business people. Dahna you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Welcome back to tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent with me now is bob and rob. Bob evans is a member of the editorial board of giving yusa and rob mitchell is the ceo of atlas of giving, and they’re both here to talk about giving in two thousand eleven and look forward a little bit. Bob, rob, welcome next-gen durney good to be here. It’s a pleasure to have you, bob. Welcome to the show. Rob. Welcome back. Rob’s been on before let’s. See? Tony? Yeah, my pleasure. Let’s. Um, let’s. Start with bob evans. Um, the methodology between e-giving yusa and atlas of giving differ considerably. What? What is bob? What is giving us a cz method for assessing fund-raising last year? E-giving you’re giving us a historically is the most accurate report on charitable giving in america. Refined it’s methodology slightly over the last couple of years, but, uh, it’s still considered to be the most accurate and consistently, uh, uh, focus. Uh, various estimates are based on economic metro’s models using tax data, government estimates from the i r s and other components of the federal government and other research institutions. Okay, but there’s a big survey component, right? Absolutely. Yeah, let’s talk about the thing, isn’t it? I mean, i think that’s what it’s known for is being a survey of charities when you talk about that individual charities air not surveyed umbrella organizations, air survey ok, well, i’m really organizations such as, uh, the the council on foundations, counsel for aid education, the national center for charitable statistics of the urban institute on some other organizations like that that compiled data for various sectors of the e-giving factors. Okay? And so you do the survey at the end of the calendar year, and then and then every june the report comes out. Is that right? That’s correct so that that the report also is revised twice based on new data that comes in from especially with the federal government. The i r s so that the estimate that came out for two thousand eleven giving will ultimately be revised slightly twice more. Okay? And i know you have a revision from two thousand ten, but we’ll get to that. We’re not. We’re not there yet. You want to talk about the methodologies first and so roughly how? Many charities are represented by the umbrella organizations that you survey. Well, they’re one point two million. One point, one one point two million non-profits in the united states is registered with the irs. And then there are two hundred twenty thousand houses of worship. But but how many are represented by the umbrella organizations that you are surveying? Uh, no. Unclear it’s. Probably the most complete survey of anybody but one point, one million non-profits air not surveyed, but because of the methodology that hughes okay, all right, but you, but you don’t know the percentage of the one point one million that you are that you are encompassing in the overreaching surveys. Okay, because we’re dealing with nine nineties were dealing with other federal reports that all non-profits are required to file. Okay. Rob mitchell, uh, atlas of giving what? What’s your methodology there. Well, tony, to give you the methadone, the methodology that we have is that using more than forty two years of published e-giving data and the u s, we were able to prove that charitable giving in the u s is specifically and directly tied to certain factors in the economy and those those factors in the economy changed by sector and by source uh, and by state and so we’ve been able to prove beyond a shadow of a doubt, the charitable giving his directly tied too specific factors in the economy, not just the overall economy. We know what those factors are, and we have built algorithms when bac checked against more than forty two years of data match up at, uh, ninety nine and a half percent coefficient of correlation, this is the same kind of technology that is used in many macro economic measurements in the us, everything from unemployment to retail sales and so are are unlike what bob’s talked about, we don’t rely on surveys at all. We have a macro view of the entire non-profit e-giving sector, we break things down by nine sectors, four sources and fifty states. And uh uh, the interesting thing about our methodology and technology is that while it is useful to look back and we’re talking now about two thousand eleven, but we already have numbers we measured by month, and so we already have Numbers through last month of 2 thousand twelve, and more importantly, we have developed a forecast. Based on the realities of the factors in the economy and demographics that dr charitable giving, we have a very active forecast out for the next twelve months. Okay, we have just a couple seconds before break. So clearly yours is a forward looking and giving us a is looking back. Bob, just, well, i’ll tell you what, we’re gonna take our break. And then we’ll talk just a tad more about your methodology. And and then we’ll get into the Numbers from 2011. So baban, rob will stay with us, and i hope that you will. Also talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three that’s two one two, seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Durney hi, this is psychic medium. Betsy cohen, host of the show. The power of intuition. Join me at talking alternative dot com mondays at eleven a. M call in for a free psychic reading. Learn how to tune into your intuition to feel better and to create your optimum life. I’m here to guide you and to assist you in creating life that you deserve. Listen every monday at eleven a, m on talking alternative dot com. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics has just quantum physics, politically expressed hi and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com this is tony martignetti, aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays, one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business, why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com lively conversation top trends, sound advice, that’s tony martignetti, yeah, that’s, tony martignetti non-profit radio and i’m travis frazier from united way of new york city, and i’m michelle walls from the us fund for unicef. Dahna and with me is bob evans from the editorial board of giving us a and rob mitchell, ceo of atlas, of giving robert won’t spend. Ah, just a little time, a couple seconds really just give listeners remind listeners like, just i should say of a few of the data points that giving us a cz forecasts are are based on well, you mean the alice e-giving what i said, i said, giving us that. Yes, i’m sorry, the atlas of giving what are just some of your econometric data points? We’ll sew it. It ranges from everything from i think most people have been in the nonprofit sector for awhile realized gdpr a significant player, but it tony, it ranges from housing starts to unemployment to corporate inventories. There are a variety of factors, and depending on what sector or wet source we’re talking about, they’re they’re different things. Obviously, the stock market in two thousand eleven it was huge for some sectors and for some sources of gifts. So, um, we have specific algorithms built for each each of nine sectors, each of four sources and for all fifty states, ok, understand on dh, those sources are the different charitable missions, i’m sorry, the sources of the funders, the four sources would be individuals, foundations, corporations and request and sector and the sectors are gonna religion, education, the arts and so forth. Okay, excellent. So what did two thousand eleven look like to atlas of giving what happened between two thousand ten in two thousand eleven? Well, two thousand eleven was a remarkable year for for bounce back giving. In the united states. We recorded the national e-giving increase of seven and a half percent in two thousand eleven, and it was fueled largely by a very robust stock market increase, especially in the first seven months of the year. And you see that reflected in several things. Back-up. Just as in a couple of examples. Donorsearch vice funds had record years. Fidelity give fund. In their gifts. For two thousand eleven, vanguard was up seventy five percent. Colleges and universities are you have to do is google college and university record fund-raising sing, and you will see literally dozens and dozens of examples, everything from from harvard and stanford. Teo small community colleges who had record fund-raising years in two thousand eleven. Right on dh. How did two thousand eleven compare to pre recession two thousand seven? Well, it’s uh it’s recovered quite nicely. We’re well past prerecession numbers in terms of total giving in the u s and you know, there’s, there are some storm clouds on the horizon. Our forecast is is a bit sobering forking last quarter of two thousand twelve, we’re going to get well. Let’s not go to the forecast was wantto compare apples and apples for so and adjusted for inflation. What kind of increase did you see from two thousand? Elation? Inflation has baked baked into all of our algorithms. So we’ve got that handled. Okay, so no adjustment necessary from that adjustment. That’s seven and a half percent growth from ten to eleven. Yes. Okay, bob evans. What did what did giving us a c from two thousand ten to two thousand eleven e-giving usa says that two hundred ninety eight point four billion dollars were given to non-profits in ten sectors across the economy. This represented about a four percent increase from two thousand ten. But when adjusted for inflation, it’s only ever about a one percent increase over two thousand ten. Ok, now those numbers are quite different. Well adjusted for inflation, one percent from giving yusa. And the same number seven and a half percent growth from the atlas of giving sabat that’s interesting. What? Uh, rob, what was your total giving number? Was it near the two hundred ninety eight point four billion that giving us a found? Oh, no, we’re well beyond that are part number was, uh, three hundred forty six billion dollars given. Okay, so we have a delta of difference of about fifty billion dollars. Roughly? Yeah, okay. Anybody care to offer their thoughts on why those the percentage and the and the gross number differ so much? Who wants to take a stab at that? Anybody you know, i’ll take a bit of a stab at it, tony, i think if you go back to two thousand eight and two thousand nine and just a bit of from my past, at one time i was the chief development officer of the american cancer society and in terms of using surveys and so forth we had we had a board policy that we didn’t participate in any survey, so it didn’t matter if it was independent sector or the association of fund-raising professionals or or the non-profit times we didn’t participate. And so you had america’s largest health charity not participating in the kinds of surveys, and then there were also there’s also some there’s, some organizations that provide this information, i think the good thing about the alice of giving it that we’re agnostic we’re not subject to two thousand two thousand ten was was an interesting year because you had this large outcry from some very large organizations that didn’t do well the previous year and put give my impression is that it put some pressure on giving us a to reconsider their methodology, which they’ve now changed, but we’re not subject to that sort of thing because we’re not changing our methodology, our methodology solid, we’re sticking with it. Okay, okay, well, let’s give bob evans a chance. You know, the keeping things civil. But i think that’s interesting because the numbers and the percentages do vary so, so greatly. Bob what? What, what? What? What’s your take on this. I think the whole issue really is. How is your organization’s faring fromthe fund-raising arena today? Uh, that regardless of the surveys, regardless of the reports like atlas e-giving are giving us a it really comes down to the bottom line of how each organization is faring and how they’re, uh, seeing support uh, these are all best guesses at at the best. Well, okay, but i think, surely uses that both get atlas of giving and giving us a are reasonably up for two thousand eleven, representing the second consecutive year for increased e-giving but also understanding the two thousand seven undoubtedly was the best year for giving that was a member of two thousand seven was the start of the great recession, okay? And that’s, when everything had cascaded groundwork rob you if i could add a little bit toe weapon, uh, saying here, you know, one of the things that we’ve been able to observe for the first time, i might add, is that, um, you take a look at two thousand eleven, there are many organizations that didn’t do well in two thousand eleven, and the reason is that if they are heavily weighted on relying on small gifts from lots of lots of small gifts from lots of small donors, they’re tremendously impacted by continuing i unimportant. On the other hand, colleges and universities donorsearch advised funds, arts organizations and others, not nearly so affected by high unemployment numbers but very favorably affected by favorable stock market value. So there are the charitable giving economy contains a lot of moving pieces, and the fun part for us is that we’re now able to identify what those moving pieces are and how they’re how they’re affecting individual sectors and individual sources, and bob is exactly right. It all boils down to, regardless of what we say or what giving yusa says says it boils down to how are you doing? And what will you be doing in the next in the next months and years? Sure, i think, though, that you know, if a charity wants the benchmark against something, it has it’s got a broad spectrum tio to benchmark against because it’s either one percent increase or seventy five percent increase. So depending on how you did individual, you could sort of you could say, well, we’re doing much better than the giving, yusa says. Everybody else did, but not as well as atlas of giving says everybody else did fair enough, but i would also add that in terms of benchmarking and part of the reason that i created the atlas of giving was because at the time that i was a fund-raising practitioner and being evaluated evaluating my staff of value, winning my programs and being evaluated myself it’s very difficult to have that kind of evaluation that comes out so late and doesn’t correspond to my fiscal year, so our benchmark is solid and consistent. Once you set the benchmark, then you’re measuring velocity and trajectory, and our benchmark comes out monthly so that i’m able to compare it to my fiscal year or practitioners compared to their fiscal year, and they can keep a monthly benchmark rather than having to wait till the end of june following the calendar year to find out okay, what the benchmark might be okay, but that’s rob mitchell and he’s, the ceo of atlas of giving and also my other guest is bob evans remember the editorial board of giving us a and we’re talking about last year’s numbers let’s move to some of the sectors bob, you and atlas, i should say you and giving us a agree that hyre ed and donor advised funds did very well, so big increases in two thousand eleven. Absolutely, i want you to talk a little about that. Why? Why you think that is? Well, i believe tremendous growth of dollars for donor advised funds is a reflection of support from middle income america in particular, who are you talking away dollars in donor advised funds because they haven’t been satisfied with the transformational projects that non-profits air presenting their banking future charitable support so you think charities or not, motivating donors sufficiently outside hyre ed, i think even in hyre ed, i think all of the categories in the nonprofit world have to reexamine what they’re asking of donors, and they need to be showing impact in transformation, and then we’ll end up seeing better. E-giving rob mitchell, what’s your take on the two sectors well increased, i think first of all, back to donor advised funds this extraordinarily good year, you know, seventy five percent increase for vanguard, eighty one percent increase for fidelity that can’t be a one year change like that cannot be explained by a change in sentiment donor-centric mint, it is specifically tied to the economy to teo economic and demographic factors. I think that what bob saying played a role, but i don’t think that was a major. Role i think the major role was the ramp up in the stock market buy-in in two thousand eleven, but why would that money go to dahna advice funds instead of directly to one of the sectors that i do not have an explanation for it, actually, and that’s, where bob is saying that he feels charities or not, people are giving, but they’re not giving directly to the charities, right, bob? Because charity’s air not motivating and moving donorsearch efficiently, i think there’s another factor to and that is when you look carefully at some of the people who are creating or funding donorsearch vice funds, they’re doing it in lieu of creating family foundation shin i wouldn’t be with that, okay, that that that major dollars going into donorsearch vice funds enables donors teo beam or anonymous i having less paperwork to file and on considerably cheaper. Setting up a private family foundation is a very expensive endeavour, right? And it requires a lot of legal activity to write on dh considerable oversight and there’s the required spending let’s, let’s look a little bit a new area that is losing market share consistently. Bob will just stay with you religion is suffering right and has been for a while a tte one point half of all giving was directed teo houses, of course. How long ago was that? Half probably about twenty to twenty five years. Ok? And how about now? What’s happening? Thirty two percent of all reported e-giving goes the houses of worship. And how does that compare to last two? Two thousand ten down down about how much? Uh, it’s down a couple of percentage points down in total dollars as well. Okay, especially the pie has gotten bigger. Okay, rob mitchell, what is what is the palace of giving see around religion? Well, we’re religion is still it gives to religion overall are still growing. We’re not showing any decrease, but they’re not the proportionately speaking e-giving growth and religion is not keeping pace with the others declining. In other words, declining market share is definitely declining markets here and their three reasons we believe for that. Well, tell us just one, because we only have a couple of minutes and i want to look a little look a little ahead with you two. So give us your main reason. Well, demographics have changed. Their church membership is declining in the u s that’s that’s one okay, important and younger people are not as motivated by religion or or its institutions at least a zolder people alright and their religion this past year was greatly affected by on high unemployment because they rely typically on lots of small gifts from okay, rob mitchelson, i think the other factor too, is that houses of worship for the least sophisticated in their fund-raising technology and an approach and expertise and complicity of america have not been trained properly like seo fund-raising not a sophisticated intelligent. Okay, all right, all right, rob, we take just maybe thirty seconds or so since yours is a forward looking model. What’s your forecast for two thousand twelve. So the calendar year forecast updated just a week or so ago is that we’re looking at an increase of four and a half percent for total national e-giving in two thousand twelve dahna the unfortunate part is that we probably have experienced the best growth we’re goingto have were showing that e-giving growth is going to begin to decline dramatically in the last quarter of the year and looking ahead of the first half of twenty thirteen, uh, things could get pretty ugly. We have to leave it there on ugly note, but there are brightstep lots, and we talked about those as well. Bob evans is a member of the editorial board of giving yusa. Rob mitchell, ceo of atlas, of giving gentlemen, thank you very much, thank you, tony. Thanks, bob, thank you all, bob. Thank you, rob. Thank you as well. Right now, we take a break when we returned tony’s take to stay with you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed, i and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com duitz welcome back, it’s. Time for tony’s take to my block this week is if you’re going to give, you got to take time off. You all work in the charitable sector in some respect either ceo or fundraiser or boardmember or something else. But the charitable sector, by definition is, is giving and in order to be most effective at giving to others, i believe you have to give to yourself and take for yourself. And what i blogged about is taking time off whether your work is in education or shelter or giving a voice to the marginalized. I believe you’ll be better at it if you take time for yourself, and that may be just something like word games or crushing an afghan, um, or doing puzzles or maybe a full vacation, but whatever it is that you need to take care of yourself, i suggest you do it for me. It’s a lot of running and some weight lifting, and i have ah, second home and i have a lovely hot tub there. So those are some of the things that i indulge in whatever you choose to indulge in, please do it without a phone next. To you, break away from the grid, go offline and take time for yourself. And that was my block this week, which is at tony martignetti dot com also want to remind you that we have a linked in group. You can give me direct feedback about the show if you have suggestions for the show suggestions for guests or show ideas even without a specific person, please, the linking group is a perfect place for that, and that is tony’s take two for friday, june twenty second, the twenty fifth show of the year and in three weeks on july thirteenth, my one hundredth show coming up just three weeks and scott was going to be on that show. Scott kottler how are you? I’m good. I’m preparing for the show right now, tony. Excellent. Ok, well, you actually should be preparing for the current show right now. Oh, i forgot about that. All right, scott koegler, of course. Our regular tech contributor and the editor of non-profit technology news, which you will find at n p tech news. Dot com. And this month, scott and i are talking about video. How come, scott wise video? Why is video? Important? Uh, all you have to do is look at you to see that number one. It is popular medium. Everybody wants to be. I have video and produced video, you know, it’s kind of the fulfillment of of a youth dream for a lot of people. A lot of a lot of frustrated actors, frustrated actors and directors. You mean absolutely, absolutely. Okay, but but it can be valuable in telling your your charities story. It could be valuable in in a lot of places, certainly on the website and sometimes just as kind of a lead in as being something active. Your log in page on your main screen, people like to see things moving. Obviously. Okay, so the trick is, you know, putting something out there, that’s worth what’s the hard part, okay? And i want teo tell listeners that tech soup had a webinar caldnear non-profit video one o one, which are social media manager regina walton found and we’re going to put a link to that women are which is a video on the facebook page and also in the linked in group after the show. So look for that tick soup. Thanks. You blink. So, scott, there are sites that will help people with video, you know, video isn’t necessarily what we normally have thought about his video, another somebody sitting in front of a camera or even motion pictures, if you will, it can be still pictures kind of assembled as a moving slideshow, maybe even annotated with voice or with that ak ground music. So there are a lot of things that pass for video, and they don’t have to be unnecessarily difficult to do, and i think that’s the main thing here is they shouldn’t be tough because if they are tough and you’re not an expert at producing them, then they’re they’re not going to be worth while watching. Okay, you gotta watch out for that, especially if you’re putting him on the home page of your of your of your blogger or your charity’s website right now, it’s a lot of us now, you know, is were attending events or just just doing things are our phones with us that have cameras in? Then we carry little video recorders or your cell phone and has a video camera and it’s and so there it turns out that there are lots and lots of real short length video or just still images. I mean, just look att facebook, facebook now houses. I think the last number i saw was that sixty percent of all the pictures ever taken ever and are on facebook pretty stunning. That’s incredible, yeah, crazy that’s an end and youtube i don’t know something like there are tens of millions of upload to youtube a day zag goring number of video uploads their alright but right and so and so we all have these devices that you’re talking about. Everybody’s got a phone so it’s like p r in your pocket, right? When when? When your charities doing something documented and so what kind of help can you get teo to create? Ah, moving slideshow or or a video on the web? There are many applications there things like i photo and there’s, i think it’s my movie and there’s a win win movie or when editor stuff like that. So depending on the platform that you’re on you khun, just look in your in your program files and find something there and those who work. Those were pretty good they can take your video clips. And you can kind of piece together what they still rely on you doing something and being a little bit technical and saying, ok, how do i put this year? I don’t make transitions between images or between video clips on howto synchronize music and there there are several either free or pretty inexpensive talking about either free or maybe for fifty dollars a year. Um, maybe up to five hundred dollars, you know, if you really want to get some superb results, kind of list off a couple of them, but yeah, that’s what? I love to go free and wait because this right, we haven’t. Article of this on on pitak news. Just go there and look for the for making videos. But the first one talk about an emoto hay and i m o tio dot com and essentially you go there and you log in and create an account. Then you could get the free account just to test it out. The only difference, really, between free and paid account the length of the video think free videos, thirty seconds or something. Which may actually be plenty. Yeah again for for a website the banner on your home page people aren’t going to sit and watch a two minute video, i don’t think, but right thirty seconds and then i mean, there, there for another reason, but something that’s engaging and, like you said, may even just be a slideshow thirty seconds is probably enough, and for a small charity, you know, you stick with what’s free. So the ladies all work is that you assemble your pictures, whether they’re on facebook or or flicker or, you know, one of the other photo on video sharing sites, and then you log into francis an emoto and you say creative video, and then it says, ok, what do you want to include in your video? And you simply select the images that are already uploaded? Or you can upload new ones if you have them on your computer, so it makes it really and, uh, at that point, then you pick a theme, so if it’s a party or if it’s an event they have these pre configured seems ok, and they also have pre configured music. So in essence, you khun select, you know, twenty or thirty images or a couple of video clips, uh, collect them together listselect style listselect music and the service will go ahead and create a set of trans so what’s, really magical is synchronized. Those with the beat of the music, which is something that would take a lot of time manually. In fact, that’s just bringing the transition manually is beyond what i what i ever do with my videos. So so it’s really value and getting some high production value from these, okay? And you can do that that’s an emoto dot com. And you could do that for free for up to thirty seconds. I think the Numbers 30 seconds. I don’t get me wrong. They’re but a short. All right, is there? Ah, you have others there’s a couple of hours and i just kind of rattle these off. I’m less familiar with, um but i know that they have the same basic kind of thing. You upload pictures and that creates it. Does other work for you. One is gulag ster g l o g dafs e r. Okay, i happen to know that one. That one does have a free. That one has a free offering also, right? Yeah, i think i think that’s. Actually, all free. Okay. I don’t think paid offering. Okay, uh, there’s one called kids. Okay, i o a and that has multiple levels. Has got a free version and also has, i think it’s fifty dollars for two years. Okay, so that’s pretty so free or cheap. I mean, twenty five dollars, a year. He’s. That thing that looks good. That zoho there’s there’s. Another one called duitz. Stupid flex flex. I’m not sure if they’re supposed to mean stupid or stupendous, but u p l i x and that’s. Actually. Probably the most expensive one, but also has a lot of additional capabilities. But it’s five dollars per month. Basic price all the way up to almost sixty dollars per month. Yeah. Okay. So, you know, you have to. I want to get some experience before your excellency. Yeah, okay, but they still have a little cost offering. And ah, bunch of these air free. Okay, excellent. Actually. So i tell you what, we’ll put links to all those on the facebook page and also on the lincoln group as well as that text webinar that i that i mentioned earlier. So we look for look for those resources on the facebook page and linked in group um, well, so we still have more time. Scott, what were going to say about video what’s your advice? Do it. I would say media mean, everyone takes pictures of their events of their staff if you just want to show, you know, pictures of the causes that you’re supporting, gather them together and just do something you’ll probably get well, you definitely get some experience. You may get some good feedback from the people that are watching and that’s kind of where you take it from there is, how did they do? Did they get it enhanced the site that people like it has been asking for more or different kind of content and just say the first thing to do is just put something together, get it up there and see what the reaction is, okay? And setting up a youtube channel is a pretty simple endeavor, right? If if you don’t want to put this on the block. Sure, sure, youtube channels a good thing, but like anything, it’s, youtube channels depend on kind of regular updates, just like if you’re putting together a vlog, you have to make it change the add things to it on a pretty frequent basis. And that’s that’s, that’s what the youtube channels are all about other that you can certainly store videos on youtube and then, you know, present them on your website on your block. Ok, right. So so you could have multiple videos now that we know we can do this for free. And we know that a short video is works fine, and we know that these sites are so full featured, we could end up having numerous videos and, like you said, save them on youtube and then rotate them, rotate their appearance on the block her you could also post them as updates. You know, people love to see themselves, right? Well, most people like to see themselves as long as they’re not doing crazy things. But if you have events, i think that’s probably the very best use of these is to have events, uh, walk around with a camera or with a little with your phone, and you talk to people on record what you’re talking about and then kind of peace together, right? As videos and yeah, those become real popular. Okay again. P r in your pocket. It’s. There we’ll take a break. We’ll take a break, and when we return, scott koegler stays with us, and i hope you do, too. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Hi, this is psychic medium. Betsy cohen, host of the show. The power of intuition. Join me at talking alternative dot com mondays at eleven a. M call in for a free second reading. Learn how to tune into your intuition to feel better and to create your optimum life. I’m here to guide you and to assist you in creating life that you deserve. Listen every monday at eleven a, m on talking alternative dot com. Hi, i’m carol ward from the body mind wellness program. Listen to my show for ideas and information to help you live a healthier life in body, mind and spirit, you’ll hear from terrific yes, who are experts in the areas of health, wellness and creativity. So join me every thursday at eleven a. M eastern standard time on talking alternative dot com professionals serving community. Hi, this is nancy taito from speaks. Been radio speaks. Been. Radio is an exploration of the world of communication, how it happens in how to make it better, because the quality of your communication has a direct impact on the quality of your life. Tune in monday’s at two pm on talking alternative dot com, where i’ll be interviewing experts from business, academia, the arts and new thought. Join me mondays at two p m and get all your communications questions answered on speaks been radio. This is tony martignetti, aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. Technology fund-raising compliance. Social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays, one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting. Talking. Welcome back to the tony martignetti non-profit radio. We’re talking about video with scott koegler, our regular contributor and the editor of non-profit technology news, which is that n p tech news dot com scott so since everybody has these phones, i mean, we could be empowering people within the charity who work for us or volunteer for us. They could be composing video no, exactly, or at least contributing. So if again i go back to the event situation, if you have a bunch of people there, which i guess is really what you want. Anyhow, it is an event. Yeah, hopefully it is not standing in a room like yourself, right? Right? So have people walk around and make their own to make their own little video clips? Have them document what is going on? And at the end of the event, uh, sent out an email asking everyone for their whatever their contributions might be on. Then you’ve got not only fast that you’ve got a diverse range of of the points, and i’m thinking, not unlike what what couples do at weddings. You could probably put some low cost video device on tables or something at the event don’t know. Is there such a thing of low cost video capture device? I’m sure they don’t, you know depends on what you call low cost, probably fifty dollars or so, but i think i think it’s a pretty good assumption that that half the people at any given function i’m goingto have video enabled smart bones. Oh, yeah, yeah, right, they’ll have their own as well, right? Yeah. So that’s, you know, that’s planning what you want to do is, uh, kind of in the invitation or in the announcement or along, even on twitter, if they’re live blogging, be sure you get get the announcement out that once you’re done worth your images and your video, send them here and, you know, a lot of the phones will actually take take images and videos and send them right there, right? When, according to your phone, it’s already connected to the internet. So say, share and you share it off with a particular destination email account. Okay, excellent. And then you’ve got, um, you know, pretty much, right? What? Okay, every once in a while i don’t know if you if it’s you stopping or we get well, a little sound. You sound like darth vader. I don’t you probably you’re not doing a darth vader imitation. Our impression, are you? Well, i’ll take the helmet off here. Okay? I’ve seen pictures of you. You don’t look like darth vader to me, but which is, which is, which is a positive. Okay, but just it’s nothing you’re doing. I don’t think, but just in case the listeners are concerned. But he’s not doing a darth vader impression and way here, it also but there’s really nothing we can do about it. Okay, so, yeah, i was going to ask you about sharing the video. So what about are there other other ways of sharing the video? I mean, if the phone is not enabled to share that way, or maybe the video is too long, i know i face that on my phone. Sometimes i can’t share a video that i’d like to what’s what? Maybe drop box or something? What’s. Another way of getting video back to the charity. Sure. First of all, you have to get it off your phone on and i’ll leave that to yeah, the knowledge of the person with the phone. That’s probably want to do to kind of figure out what it’s for for many different phones were basically, somehow you gotta plug it into your computer and move that that video file over to the computer. And then, of course, you can email it. Um, you know, one of the things you talk about there’s the size of the video files, right? And that’s typically what prevents you from sharing it from your phone? And i would suggests that any video quick should be under five seconds overviewing walk home. Recording video. Yeah, because you’re looking at a little clip, right? When we put this video together, if it’s only going to be thirty seconds long, how long can each individual could be? Uh, right. Okay. I was envisioning. Yeah, i was thinking of longer clips, but now, right. Okay, so you want people to send you a bunch of short? Sent a bunch of short clips, right? And you see, here is a little secret. If you look at any video production movie, a television production, anything, just take a look and see quickly the scenes transition. You’ll find that most most scenes, uh, except for soliloquies or something like that are really just a couple of seconds. So it’s not unusual. It’s it’s the norm. In fact, they have very, very short video clips. Okay, all right, well, this is why scott koegler this is why you’re the the show’s technology contributor. You’re thinking about these things, andi. I was so my thinking was erroneous, all right? And, you know, you could empower volunteers as well. Oh, are people who are benefiting from your services? I mean, they could be armed with a video phone, right? And those are the kind of tell your story kind of thing. So if your if you are let’s say you’re an animal shelter and you got volunteers at the animal shelter or you’ve got people who have a dahna dead animals, you know, every one of those with a story unto itself, many of them may be, you know, pretty inspirational. So if you got your animal home and it’s working out great, you know, ask them to go ahead and take a shot of the of their situation and send it in you. Khun chop it up, put some pictures in it and added to it, you could have a simple contest like tell, you know, tell us your story in twenty seconds or thirty seconds, right, exactly on have a small prize for people or something. All right, all right, excellent way have just about thirty seconds left. Any parting suggestion you want to leave people with, uh, i would say the biggest thing is just do it, do it out. Do it. Um, you know, take videos, take images and intermix both of those things together. Don’t do one or the other, although if all you have is his images that still works. Okay, you get out there. Excellent. Good to talk to you, scott, and we’ll talk to him three weeks on the hundredth anniversary, our hundredth show. All right, thanks, tony. Take care. Thank you. My pleasure. Also, my thanks, tio, rob mitchell and bob evans for being guest this week. Next week. Board effectiveness. Gail gifford is the author of making your board dramatically more effective starting today. But you’ll have to wait till you hear the show you can’t you can’t start today, so next week you’ll be able to start today or the day you hear it. So actually, maybe she should change the name of the book, i don’t know, but that may be overreaching anyway. We’re going to talk about making your board more effective, starting quickly with gail gifford next week, and i’ll have a fund-raising day interview with paul clolery he’s, the editor in chief of the non-profit times we’re all over the social networks, you can’t make a click without smacking your head into tony martignetti non-profit radio you want to know who’s going to be on the show? Sign up for our weekly insider email alerts on the facebook page we’re unlinked in you can offer ideas for shows and make comments each week and look for the resource is that we just talked about with scott on facebook and linkedin this week. You can listen live our archive, which means we’re on itunes itunes you find us at non-profit radio dot net on twitter you can follow me and you can use the show’s hashtag non-profit radio my thanks! Telenet singleton for her, tweeting today, as she very often does. Thanks linette, a most attractive on foursquare. You can connect with us, connect with me there. Our creative producer was clear miree off. Sam liebowitz is the line producer of the show show. Social media is by regina walton of organic social media and the remote producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is john federico of the new rules help you be with me next friday, one to two p, m eastern at talking alternative dot com. I think a good ending. You’re listening to the talking alternative network, itching to get anything. Duitz how’s your game. Want to improve your performance, focus and motivation than you need. Aspire, athletic consulting, stop second guessing yourself. 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057: The Nonprofit Outcomes Toolbox – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guest this week:

Robert Penna, author of “The Nonprofit Outcomes Toolbox: A Complete Guide to Program Effectiveness, Performance Measurement, and Results”

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://mpgadv.com

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Zoho welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio we’re always talking about big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent. I’m your aptly named host. I hope that you were with me last week for first segment the goods on google, plus our tech contributor and the editor of non-profit technology news, scott koegler shared insights into whether google plus is different than what we’ve already got in the social media space and how to help you to decide the answer to the question should we jump into google? Plus, when organization page has become available and we also did a live google plus hangout second segment last week was breaking down barriers. Megan galbraith, managing director at changing our world, had strategies to get public relations, communications and fund-raising working together for greater efficiency this week, the non-profit outcomes toolbox. Robert penna, author of the non-profit outcomes toolbox a complete guide to program effectiveness, performance measurement and results discusses the wave of reliance on outcomes, measurement and how small and midsize non-profits khun ride it comfortably alongside big shops and learn lessons from the corporate community on tony’s, take two from my block this week if donors are investors, then they need a motley fool. I think we’re going to see the rise of investment advisory services. There were a few, but mostly for the wealthy that recommend giving to some charities and against giving to others, which is very different than what we have in the space today. That’ll be on tony’s, take two at roughly thirty two minutes into the hour we’re live tweeting today, use the hashtag non-profit radio to join the conversation with us on twitter. We take a break right now, and when i come back, i’ll be joined by robert penna. We’re going to talk about the non-profit outcomes toolbox, so stay with me. Dafs you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? Call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight three that’s to one to seven to one eight one eight three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set to one, two, nine six four three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom two, one two, nine, six, four, three five zero two. We make people happy. Geever hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com. Welcome back to tony martignetti non-profit radio. My guest now is robert penna. He is the author of a complete i’m sorry. The non-profit outcomes toolbox. A complete guide to program effectiveness, performance measurement and results published by wiley and sons. He’s, a consultant and his work includes the application of corporate sector, outcome based tools and insights to the work of non-profits he’s done work for the n e casey foundation, the national geographic foundation and the ford foundation. He’s, an adviser to charity navigator on outcomes. I’m very glad that his work and his book bring him to the studio. Robert. Welcome. Thank you very much for having pleasure to have you. Thank you for coming all the way down from albany. No problem. Live in the studio. In the studio. We hear an increasing amount of talk about out comes out comes measurement. Why is that? I would save it for basically two reasons. A one’s historical. The fact is that traditionally and this goes back easily to the beginning of the last century. No one ever asked non-profits to be quite fair. No one ever asked non-profits to either show evidence of or to demonstrate that. They were having an actual impact that was sort of a field of dreams and concept. If we make it available, things must get better, and it was taken on faith that train people with good programs with enough money would bring about positive change. Nobody actually quite asked altum that all started to change in the late seventies and then into the eighties, and quite independently of one another in various spaces, this concept of a focus on results in outcomes and evidence of same started a crop up, and it began to coalesce and particularly as we are in an in an era of limited resource is it becomes more important than ever for non-profits to be able to say here’s actual evidence of what we’ve accomplished, as opposed to a story about how big the problem is or how hard we’re trying in his forward ken berger, president, ceo of charity navigator who’s been a guest on the show, says that measurement is a battle for the very soul of the nonprofit sector. It’s taking on that great a prominence? Yes, it is that actually that line comes from a from an article ken and i co co authored it really is because there are those apologised who honestly believe in its ah term use before a fair exchange of differing ideas. You honestly believe that non-profits and their clients should not be held tio this kind of accountability that the concept of just making services available truly is the mission of the non-profit space and that as long as they’re doing that, they’re doing their job. The problem is that for all of the money we’ve spent thes problems haven’t gone away. And so the question is, shouldn’t we be putting our our resource is into those programs into those organizations that have proven that there having the most beneficial impact, as opposed to giving it to other places that are perhaps not being as effective? The problems are too big, and the resource is of too scarce not to do this anymore, but it truly is a battle within the sector because there are those who just don’t believe in it, and we’ll get to a little of what their arguments are, maybe obliquely only, but that some of the ideas are so nebulous that they can’t be measured that like a child feeling a more positive. Ah, feeling about education or about going to school, sort of nebulous ideas like that. But actually, those, um, sort of feel good outcomes can be measured. Well, first off, i would argue that if an organization is focusing primarily or almost or solely on, feel good outcomes, they’re rethinking what they’re doing. Number one. But number two, there are proxies. There are proxies in terms of attitude, in terms of behaviour, in terms of various other kinds of things that can be looked at and can be taken as fairly accurate measures of whether or not if what, you want to changes in attitude, whether or not that attitude has changed. So it can be done. And we’re gonna talk about some of the ways that non-profits get there and the way that we can measure these things. Is the butt is the story is the non-profits story the compelling story is that is that dead? Well, it it shouldn’t be dead, but what it should be, what should happen is that should be put in its place, okay? The idea of telling a story is not a bad one, in fact, that there’s a whole chapter in the book that talks about using narrative as opposed to just factoids, because people remember stories where they have a tendency to forget much more vivid right stories vivid. But the problem is, if the if the story first off focuses on how big the problem is and that’s all it, it focuses on, and there are a number of non-profits i won’t name any, but you could probably think of them. You get through with the things in the mail and they show you the picture of x, y or z and it’s always how big the problem is when we’re telling that kind of story and that’s all we’re telling we are, in a way, avoiding entirely the question of well, what are you doing about it? And what other results that you have that you have achieved? So that’s one one reason why the story has to be put in his proper place? The second is, and i don’t know whether we’ll get into this today, but a lot of non-profits wind up telling the wrong story for the wrong reason and ofttimes to the wrong people so that something has to be carefully handle is okay, we have just another minute before a break, what if not a named example? What do you mean? Telling the wrong story? A lot of non-profits will focus on an emotional story that will highlight, for example, a success story, and it will be about this client of that client, but inadvertently, what they’re doing is they’re focusing the attention on that client. What we don’t know is, is that story cherry picked? How representative actually is it what they’re not talking about is thie the the work that the organization as a whole does it’s it’s? Shall we say it’s it’s macro impact? They focus so specifically on the story of this particular client at that particular point that becomes very easy for their overall message of what they’re doing to be lost, counterproductive in counter falik snusz his book is the non-profit outcomes. Toolbox, it’s, robert penna. You’ll find his blogged outcomes, toolbox, dot com, and he’ll be with me after this break. So stay with us because you didn’t think to getting dink dink dink. You’re listening to the talking alternate network, get in. Thank you, cubine. Are you stuck in your business or career, trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future. You dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight. Three backs to one to seven to one eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Dahna looking to meet mr or mrs right, but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your current relationship as filling as possible? Then please tune in on mondays at ten am for love in the morning with marnie allison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Tune in as we discuss dating, relationships and more. Start your week off, right with love in the morning with marnie gal ilsen on talking alternative dot com. Are you feeling overwhelmed and the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed hi and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Metoo welcome back to tony martignetti non-profit radio talking to robert penna about his book the non-profit outcomes toolbox right before the break, robert, we were talking about for too much focus on problems, but the non-profit sectors exists to solve problems. So shouldn’t they be talking about what the problems are? Well, again, it has to be put into its proper place in its proper perspective. And this is not, you know, women teo, bash the sector. Okay, i mean, we have to be on it eyes and say, this is a historical perspective and very early on this was how attention was brought. Tea to issues were literally going back to the late eighteen hundreds and early nineteen hundreds pompel people, for example, he’d carry nation she’s well known for wanting teo, bring about prohibition. Well, what she talked about was all of the ancillary downsides of alcoholism, all right, and the folk. But the focus was on drink. The focus was on people drinking too much. And the idea was they didn’t think think it through to say, well, what’s really gonna happen. What other causes here? It was just too focused on the drinks, and we had prohibition and guess what? All of those issues did not go away. The issues of broken families, the issues of domestic violence, the issues of unemployment, the issues of of poverty didn’t go away just because we we got rid of alcohol for those period that period of time. So part of the problem of the focus on just the problem is it tends to lead to simplistic answers, because the concept is that progresses a lack of the problem when, in point of fact, really, the outcomes approach is that what you want to do is bring about some positive change that goes beyond merely an absence of the problem. So that’s one of the problems with focusing on just the problem, the second thing is that it kind of takes you off the hook if you think about it, for having to say, really what you have done to alleviate the problem or what success you’ve had in alleviating the problem. If every time i come back to you, pick an issue, homeless puppies, i come to you and i sent put something in the mail and tony, you know, look at all these starving puppies and i say it was ten thousand starving puppies and you know it, justin in manhattan or someth that’s a problem and you emotionally are expected to resupply with a cheque will. Now, next year i come back and i say, well, now, there’s ten thousand homeless puppies, this still ten thousand homeless puppies will again. What it keeps focusing on is the problem it does not focus on am i having an impact on alleviating such chelation so that’s, a real sort of short way of describing why that tends to be a ah sort of a circle, you know, like the snake eating its own tail. It really doesn’t get you where you need to pay. And you alluded to earlier the fact that we do still have deep seated, entrenched problems that we have been working on for generations like homelessness, entrenched poverty, etcetera, exactly right be a hunger of broken family, you name it, these problems, or of worldwide and so you might even get thes these appeals from any place on the globe. But it tends to in a lot of ways, i think lead to a sense of defeat, because, i mean, think about it if every single year, you get the same appeal from the same organization showing the same picture of the same a person in need. The question starts to it begs the question, well, what’s happening with my money, what we’ve been at it for so long, and we’re still seeing the same one problem. One gentleman i speak there speaking to some months ago, he runs a non-profit e program in ohio, and he said to me, well, do candy said, you know, we’ve been fighting this war on poverty for, you know, forty something years, and i’m not so sure we have anything to show for it. And part of the reason is that from the beginning, what we have to show for it was not the accent the accent was on making money available and making programs available. You’ve heard a thousand times there, the concept, the underserved community, right, which you could argue about whether they’re actually underserved enough that’s a different story. But the question is what it seems to lead to. It leads to the implication that if you make services available, things will be better. Well, that’s not necessarily true. Just making them available, zach. Will will result in the outcome that you want exactly, and for years social investors you know, traditionally called funders, we’re investing in making services available rather than investing in change, and if you’re investing in change, then there ought to be sameer marks of the change. The whole concept of moving your your your your head away from the idea of being a funder. What’s being an investor is one of the first the first steps what’s a fund interested in a funder is interested in the dispersement of funds in terms of the process, the paperwork who’s it going to what’s it being used for what’s an investor interest is an investor in investor wants a return let’s talk about some more of the language differences that you point out not so much differences, but the important language around outcomes measurement that takes up roughly the first third of the book or so gent generally outputs versus outcomes, outputs or what you do outcomes of what happens because of what you did okay? Example of an output and output is training class, and the outcome would be that somebody got a job by virtue of having been trained. And more importantly, kept the job for a reasonable amount of time when and this was this was rampant in the late sixties and seventies. Excuse me, but when thanks to largely the government we got into being counting and compliance, no organisations were measured onto in terms of how many fannies their head in the seats, how many training training class they help? Well, that was great, but then it turned out in some cases people we trained for jobs that no longer existed or the training was insufficient, or there really was no placement attached to it. So we had organizations claiming success because they’ve had x number of fannies in the seats or because they held so many trainings. Well, they gave us so many certificates, but the end of the day was anybody hyre did anybody did anybody’s life improved? Well, don’t ask me that question when i focused on that we’re focused on how many training on the output not come from the outcomes spring from the outputs. Yes, yes, you need the outputs in order to get the outcomes and they have to be the right outputs. But again, if that is only just your focus is there’s a saying that a colleague of mine, a colleague of mine who wrote a book, if well, you fundez activity that’s. Usually all you get? Yes. Okay. All right. Impact, impact flows from outcome. What? Tell us about it and that’s down the road that’s down the road. In other words, for example, let us say that what you were talking about was bringing possible water. And this is something i was engaged in a t united nations potable water, fresh water supplies to certain kinds of villages. I was pronouncing potable. Is that okay? Potable vote on a laudable somebody made a tomato, somebody from and why you were calling correct one of us. I have to. But i was so it’s possible that anyone when you were with the united nations so that’s a hyre i’m just tony martignetti non-profit radio it’s hyre hyre standing. But you had a situation where okay you’re you’re bringing fresh water. And now you could think of a host of reasons early on why you might want to do that. One of the more interesting ones to me was to alleviate the burden on the women and girls. In the village usually whose job it is to do nothing while david hold water one of the reasons why their educational opportunities were so so stunted was because, well, gee, somebody’s got to get the water and that’s the woman and children’s job. Or rather, a woman and girls job. Well, let us say that you bring it in and let us say that some girl does get to go to school. Well, perhaps if twenty years later when she’s an adult, she actually has a business and gets out of the out of the village, that might be an impact. But the problem with the focusing on impacts these long term impacts is very often the causal chain is extremely weak. The causal chain is broken and it’s kind of hard. Teo teo to take credit for some things. I mean, we’ve all heard the stories of the head start program that’s taking credit because thirty five years later, one of their graduates became the head of some, you know, ceo of some company. Well, you know, thanks, snusz because back in nineteen forty seven, he was with us in today’s end of a corporation. I don’t know. About that, but i honestly would say impacts agreed to have these are the kinds of things you see in mission statements and vision statements. The long term impacts, what organizations need to do is figure out how to translate those things into measurable, achievable, significant, meaningful outcomes. Okay? And shortly we’re gonna talk about the outcome statement and contrast it with the mission statement and talk about what the elements are and how to get to ah ah, eh, a proper and and viable outcome statement. So yeah, and just around impacts, you say in the book impacts or what we hoped for, outcomes are what we work for. We’ve talked about that means your outcomes or what you’re working toward the impact of the the longer term we really we talked about funder donorsearch sis investor. Anything else you want to say about the about? Maybe non-profits looking at themselves as invest, ese. Well, that’s, that’s a very good point. I mean, when someone gives you a gift. Christmas gift. Okay, now we’ve all had the relative who gives us something. And then every once a while checks are you using it? You? Have you been? Did you? Like the sweat in most people that give you a gift, they hope you like it, but they really don’t have any kind of control now. My grandmother used to give me cash, she would slip me cash in by hand like a handshake, and she would always say, spend it like you earned it. My grandmother never did that. You didn’t know i’m sorry, no migraine with a borrowed but no that’s, um, we’re not related even starting now, but the idea is when someone gives you a gift, really the in most cases, the string of scott, you know, the the very there, the influence they have over the use of that gift, et cetera. Well, the problem is when you think of yourself, if you’re a non-profit as a grantee of donor of a donation or giving, okay, the implication that the onus is on you to deliver something back to that to that donor to that investor is i like to use use the term is much less clear than if you see them as investors and you see yourself as an invested because right from the start from the basic language, what we’re making clear is that you owe them a return investments give returns exactly. And so the mindset shift is that i mentioned before the first one is moving from the concept of thunder to investor the second is moving from the concept that what we’re investing in is the provision of services opposed to we’re investing in change, and then what are those changes and how do you define them? And the third thing is that we’re going to be satisfied with an account of activity as opposed to actual evidence of results, performance and effectiveness. The’s a three crucial mindset shifts that the space has to eventually and will adopt, and the sooner non-profits get on this, the better off they’ll be. You quote stephen covey saying, it is incredibly easy to be very busy without being very effective. Well, we’ve always have seen those people who can, you know, go to the office in the busy all day, and at the end of the day, what have they actually accomplished? And the answer is, you know, not a heck of a lot and that’s, you know, that’s, the wife, i’m with robert pennant he’s, the author of the non-profit outcomes toolbox. Let’s, talk a little about the outcome statement versus the how does it contrast with the mission statement? The well, mission statements of very often pie in the sky and aspirational mean they ought to be yes, and an inspirational okay, okay, but the idea is that the idea that we’re going to solve a problem in our time we’re gonna end poverty, will end homeless. Is thies air the kinds of things that you very often see working their way into? Ah, emission statement or vision statement. The problem is that how do you then actually turn around and effectuated if you basically go to an investor and they said, what do you know what we’re gonna do? We’re gonna end and homelessness. Well, you’re probably not. So when you don’t, what do you could do? You come back and say i failed an outcome statement is based upon a couple of key characteristics that good outcomes have among those are all right. It’s. Meaningful it’s. Not a cosmetic change. It’s. Sustainable that’s. A very, very important one. Right? It’s achievable. All right, there’s, an old state. Everyone talks about the weather. No one does anything about it. Why? Because global warming aside, it’s. Tough to do anything about the weather. All right. But if you a couch your your goals in not slam dunks you want, they want them to be doable with a stretch. You? I mean, you clearly want to push yourself all right. But the idea is that you want it to be something that can be achieved in your lifetime on dh something that can be measurable. The sustainable part is particularly crucial. I think of my involvement. I’m a lifelong scout. Around fifty eight years old. I first joined the boy scouts when i was ten. I mean, eagle scout. Well, i never made it that i was in the order. The arrow you want? Ditigal oh, no, no, no it’s a different. But i have a son who was in the order of the arrow and he’s an eagle scout like vicarious thrills. But we i remember ah, project, where are we going to clean up a lot and throw this lot had been used as a dumping ground. The scouts came in and we weed whackers and rakes and tree pruners. And we turned it looks like a park when we’re done all right. And we congratulate ourselves. Up, up, up we all went home in that night’s peace. Somebody dumped a refrigerator. It wasn’t a sustainable achievement because we didn’t have the facility for either blocking it office, stopping people from dumping again. So the concept has to be again in terms of a good outcome, one of the characteristics and aki one is this concept of sustainability. But again, to go back to your question about the difference between a mission statement of vision statement and an outcome statement a lot of organizations have a tough time differentiating in the book i refer to ah, vision approach. You may recall the book in the book, i had a picture of some futuristic city, teo illustrate that my belief is that mission statement envision statements are both great things, a good ideas, they’re visionary, they belong up on the wall, but they don’t belong in terms of you every day action plan, they’re different from an action plan. It’s the difference be between having the long term goal of i want to speak? I want to be trimmed and having an actual diet that you’re that you’re following. All right? Um, you know, there are numerous examples we could have that we could we could point to okay, i’m realizing now, since we’re talking about since i’m talking about being an eagle scout, you know, i didn’t measure the the outcomes of my eagle scout project, which was teo. Make sure that address is street addresses were visible to emergency services in my little town of altum panned newjersey, which had maybe three thousand homes or so so we looked at every home and where there wasn’t a visible address from the street that a policeman or fireman or the ambulance could find could see it easily. We left a note in the in the mailbox and the note was signed by the police chief, the fire chief and the the head of the ambulance corps. But that’s just that’s just activity. I don’t know what the outcome’s were. I don’t know if more lives were saved. Police response times. We’re reduced fire response times are reduced. That would have been right. That would come into the out moment. And what? And if you had done the eagle project as an outcome, you know, an outcome based thing that was specifically the kinds of things that you would have wanted to look at. Now that was response time reduced. Yeah, you know, i don’t know anything is dramatic is where lives saved but certainly were response times reduced. You could even you could even have done it as looking at things like ups, you know? Did ups have fewer lost deliveries because they were brought to the wrong home. All right, i have thiss factual case up in albany way. Have to hold on your case. Feeling bad? About my eagle project from thirty five years ago, this is tony martignetti, tony martignetti non-profit radio. We have to take a break after the break. We’ll be tony’s. Take two for two minutes, and then i’ll return with robert penna. Stay with us. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Dahna are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed, i and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com are you concerned about the future of your business for career? Would you like it all to just be better? Well, the way to do that is to better communication, and the best way to do that is training from the team at improving communications. This is larry sharp, host of the ivory tower radio program and director at improving communications. Does your office need better leadership, customer service sales, or maybe better writing, are speaking skills? Could they be better at dealing with confrontation conflicts, touchy subjects all are covered here at improving communications. If you’re in the new york city area, stop by one of our public classes, or get your human resource is in touch with us. The website is improving communications, dot com, that’s, improving communications, dot com, improve your professional environment, be more effective, be happier, and make more money improving communications. That’s. The answer. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com metoo dahna welcome back to the show, it’s time for tony’s take two two minutes at roughly thirty two minutes after the hour. Roughly my block this week is if donors are investors, then they need a motley fool motley fool is an online investment advisory service actually recommends stocks, too, its members and my thinking is, and this is sort of related to what robert and i are talking about if donors are in fact investors to non-profits then are we going to go beyond just ratings that charity navigator and guidestar offer into recommendations, overt, explicit recommendations, invest in this non-profit this other non-profit is not a good recommendation, not abi, maybe it’s ah, hold or maybe it’s even a cell? Um, there are organisations like this that do services like that they’re a couple do them mostly for the wealthy rockefeller philanthropy advisors is probably the best known, but i think if if if donors are becoming investors than we’re going to see this trickle down, too, the average moderate income, modest income investor in non-profits and then, you know, with the with the comparisons across non-profits b bye sector like and with that sector be charitable mission would it be geographic, so that may be the best healthcare investment, as as an investor is a certain hospital or or ah non-profit clinic in aa county or in a town or in the city? Um what it would have come to the point where it’s, you know, your investment in the indianapolis dance company is most likely to pay off or more likely to pay off, and what does pay off mean than some other investment in some other indianapolis arts group or or dance company? So i think related to what robert and i are talking about and just interesting, you know, um, non-profit investment advisory services, you know, are we headed there? There’s more about that on my block at mpg a dv dot com and that is tony’s take two for friday, september second, bringing robert penna welcoming him back now. We were just before the break, talking about the outcome statement hyre should be meaningful, achievable, sustainable on dh the book goes into a little more detail, even oh, and i’d like to because i’d like to help our listeners achieve an outcome statement. Ah, you say that should be bound in time and number. The outcome stable? What does that mean? Well, what it basically means is rather than saying, we’re going to change the world, it’s, that we’re going to specifically a change ah, certain measurable of facet of characteristic of someone for a certain number of people within a certain given period of time. So the idea said, we’re going to achieve x for why number of people within two months, three months, one year, whatever it may be so that the idea is that first off it’s it’s tethered to ah, a certain number of people that you’re going teo achieve this for, and also a certain specific times. So that, for example, the investor knows when the payoff comes, let me give you another reason why this is crucial if you were if you read the book as they know you know you did, you probably came across the work capacity ten thousand times capacity. You don’t have to read the book to hear about capacity over the building in no, no, no, but over here, this is a very, very specific use. If you haven’t outcomes approach, it automatically begs the capacity question, because if you are clear about what it is you want to achieve from that flows what it is. You need to get there, which then challenges you to say, do i have that capacity most non-profits and i hate to use generalizations. But i think in this case, it’s true. Most on traffic. It’s a most people who are aware of the non-profit space when you talk about capacity building the first thing they will think about his dollar signs. All right, we’re having a capacity capacity raising effort. What? It’s? A fund raiser. True capacity, however, has three levels. All right. The first one is structural capacity. How is the organization run? How is it managed? What’s the relationship between the board and the executive leadership what’s the quality of the training of the staff, et cetera. The second is what i call functional capacity. Basically, what that means is if you go, you do have the tools to do what you say you’re going to do. If you were an education organization, then you need educators. You need a curriculum. If you’re counseling organization unique counselors and you need some sort of models, they’re all your inputs. Yes, exactly. The third one and perhaps the most important one is the implementation capacity the’s are the thousand and one little things that not just non-profits but anybody trips up, trips over when it comes to actually doing a job, it could be, for example, twenty you or i are going to put a curtain rod, and it turns out we don’t have a level well, if we don’t have a level, how we’re gonna make sure the curtain rod is level that’s an implementation capacity issue when you talk about a non-profit it could be everything from the from the requirement to provide transportation so the clients could actually get there to something like intake if you want. If you’re goingto have seventy five people, let us say graduate from your program will do you have the capacity for a new intake to actually process those seventy five people? So they’re not standing on line three hours and losing interest and wandering away. Who’s gonna answer the phones let’s say you have a a an outreach effort going on, and you have a training program and you put the word out on the street, but then it turns out that your non-profit is really run all by part timers and most of the time, if anybody calls to get information, they’re either going to get just a phone that rings or they’re going to get an answering machine that’s a capacity questions. So if you’re doing this correctly, it really forces you to look at a number of things, including the capacity that you have to actually achieve the goals. If you don’t have it, then you have to upgrade the capacity or perhaps scale back the goals and flowing from this quantification of of what you want outcomes to be is measurable because they become measurable when you’ve quantified and bound in-kind time number so we can, in fact, measure things that are i have previously been so just vague sort of objectives. Let me give you a classic example on this may sound like a bit of a stretch to euro to your readers, but you and i being roughly the same age, i think you have. You have readers we have listen that’s, right, our reader listeners, because they’re all gonna buy your book, my readers just the non-profit outcomes toolbox published by wile e you recall when when when we were kids, we had things like, you know, lincoln logs and directors were there and they were even wood and the logs we’re made for, right? Okay, this is going to sound like a bit of a weird one, but compare think back, compare when you’re building one of those things, too. When your mother built a big cake, your mother baked the cakes you took all the ingredients she pour them in a bowl should put him in a pan, she put in the oven and she lost at that point total control of what was going on. No one’s going to know whether cake was good or bad until after it was done. It came out. It was cool when you tasted it, and if something were on, there was nothing you could do thinking back, however, to the example, the lincoln logs with the tinker toys, the directors that we had a guide. The guide showed a step by step where we should be at every point in time, if at any point in time, what we’re building didn’t look like the picture we could stop, we could go back and we could fix it. That’s one of the differences of working with outcomes as opposed to not when you don’t work without comes we have to be the only position you’re in is to hope for a good end result, but you can’t control it because you have no idea really what’s going on with the variables. If you’re tracking using an outcome system all right, and it is bound in time and is bound in number, and you do know that by a certain date x number of people should be at stage four if they’re not there, then you still have time to fix it if you have no clue where they’re supposed to be, or what we could do was hope for good results of the end, and if you don’t get it, well, then we did, you say, sorry, better looking altum you don’t know that as a child actually had an easy bake oven, i didn’t have the lincoln logs. My brother had the lincoln logs, i had the easy bake oven dahna they should also be your outcome statement verifiable, and this is all really, i’m i’m breaking it down the way you do in the book, but just flows naturally from the way you’re describing it. We have to be able to verify where we are time versus goal on dh and reassess, say more about verifiability. Verifiability basically means that some third party can look at it without spending a ton of money, because again, and maybe this is that not to take anything away from professional evaluators, but evaluation cost money and professional evaluators in professional valuation services. I mean, these people are very good at what they do, but the point is that hopefully what you’re doing is verifiable in the easier way i mean, is there’s an old saying, you know, chicken soup is good for the soul? Well, it could be, but it’s, hard to tell. You know, what you want to do is you want to stick to things that have some fairly easily discernible evidence that can be seen and that’s what it means, my verifiable it means staying away from outcomes to talkabout, as you said before, well, somebody feels better about themselves. In their place in the universe, well, that’s a little bit nebulous. And so i would recommend that if you’re looking to create a good outcome statement, a good outcome for you program that you stay away from the cosmic, the psychic, the overly emotional and definitely the extraterrestrial. Okay, so first step to create a proper outcome statement is what decide what you want to be different at the end of this program. So you’re definitely looking forward toward gin with the end in mind begins, and you say that the book begin with the engine dart with what do you want to be different about a certain situation or a certain set of conditions as a result of your program, start there. If you can’t define, then maybe should rethink what you’re doing and in determining that you need to be bound in number and time and those miserable those of the descriptions as you working back, which is yes, but the idea is what you want to start with is a change you want to start with being able to define a change. We’ve kind of alluded to this, but the basic basic idea with the changes what’s called the backs measures change in the behavior, attitude, condition, knowledge or status of those you seek to serve. So you start with the change in their behavior, their attitude, that condition and knowledge or the status and it doesn’t have to be a person. It could be a forest that could be it could could be a watershed. The status goes from being threatened to not tear being safe to being protected. But the idea is you start with the change and defining if you can’t define it, then my suggestion is you start to rethink a lot of organizations. Start with the problem. And then the next question is, what do we do? Well, what do we do? That’s that’s. The wrong place to start the place to start is first off. What changes do we want to bring about? Secondly, what resource is will it take to do that? Thirdly, you know what actions or programs will it take to effectuate that it’s? A total reverse of the usual way of approaching most of these issues. That’s. Ah, sort of a summary of of developing your own outcome statement. And there’s, obviously a lot more detail. In the book again, the book is the non-profit outcomes toolbox, we have just about a minute before the break, how do we start to apply and outcomes analysis? You have a lot of tools in the book, but how do we get there? Well, first off an easy thing by the book, but beyond that, there are any number of very, very thoughtful people who have created some of these tools that are out there. The problem is that most non-profits i don’t know about them. Everybody, for example, is heard of the logic model. Well, what they don’t understand what the logic model was originally intended to do was to intended to be a supposed to the way a lot of people are suggesting it be used. Today there are alternatives to this, and the book is one way of finding out about them and it reinventing the wheel is not necessary. These wheels have already being been invented. The question is knowing which ones work for you. And that was the whole concept behind the toolbox approach to the book that perhaps we can talk about after the break. Okay, way are going to take a break. If you’ve not heard of the logic model, then you’re with me. So i’m going to ask robert after the break to just briefly talk about that. And then we’re going to talk about some of tools and lessons you can learn from the for-profit from the corporate sector in outcomes measurement. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio stay with us. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Buy-in oppcoll this is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio fridays, one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting do you want to enhance your company’s web presence with an eye catching and unique website design? Would you like to incorporate professional video marketing mobile marketing into your organization’s marketing campaign? Mission one on one media offers a unique marketing experience that will set you apart from your competitors, magnify your brand exposure and enhance your current marketing effort. Their services include video production and editing, web design, graphic design photography, social media management and now introducing mobile market. Their motto is we do whatever it takes to make our clients happy. Contact them today. Admission one one media dot com told you. If you have big ideas and an average budget to tony martignetti non-profit radio, we dio. I’m jonah helper, nari team in co founders of next-gen charity metoo welcome back to the show. Our last segment. Let’s define the logic model because maybe i know it by a different name, robert. But you may know that what is that? That is actually the name of it. If the logic model is a away that non-profits have had for some years now ah planned it’s one of the tools that they’ve used for planning how to get to the outcomes from the starting point. But the logic model became very well known when kellogg adopted at the kellogg foundation. Same is the cereal people, the telephone, isha and united way of america adopted. And in both of those cases they kind of put the word out amongst their there either case of kellogg, that grantees, and in the case of the united way of america, the local affiliates, that this was one of the earliest outcomes frameworks that you could potentially use not doing under do plug. But in my previous book, outcome frameworks, that was one of the things we talked about, because the idea was there were these various models, and how do they compare one to the other? And what were the pluses and minuses of all of them that had never been done? Before, which is why i wrote that previous book, but the logic model truly was meant as a is a graphic illustration of cause and effect within a program that this input will lead to that which will lead to the third, which will lead to the fourth and hopefully get you two the the the the end point that you that you desire, the problem is it was never actually designed to be a management or tracking tool. And when organizations and there are a lot of people, very thoughtful people who do use it for this personally, i think it’s cumbersome and what you wind up with since the whole design was a flow chart, very often you wind up with all of these various lines at the doubling back on each other. So some of someone i know, okay, so we’re past that now that we’re in the outcomes toolbox, right? And why did you choose the toolbox metaphor? Kinds of the toolbox was very simple. Let’s go back to that curtain, rod, you and i, we’re going to put a human. You don’t go back to my eagle scout. No, no, i’m still sinjin, i’m going to go back to the curtain rod, you’re not going to put up a few minutes ago without the level. Let’s say you’re putting up the the curtain, ron and all the tools you had. We were craftsman. And at one point you needed that level that i mentioned and you say, bob, give me a level. Well, if the level i gave you was a stanley, would you refuse to use it? Because it was a question like all the other tools? Probably not. You would. You would use the tools at hand. Okay. In the non-profit space, most of these frameworks, our proprietary, this one belongs to ran. That one belongs to the rental of ill institute, the third one’s associated with this with this person or this institution. As a result, what traditionally happened was, let us say, a representative of that organization or the consultant came in and they would wind up basically saying to non-profits my model b a, b, c or d it’s the bass o matic of outcome frameworks. It slices it, dices it chops, it walks the dog. It does everything. The problem is none of them do everything. All of them. Do something, all of them do several somethings some of them do some things very well, but none of them do everything well. And so what we want of doing was inadvertently offering them the space eighty pence, eighty percent solutions to one hundred percent problems. It’s telling people, for example, that the logic model was the be all and end all was one such example. My concept is, and the reason is called the toolbox in the book, i do not care about the authorship, the ownership, the providence or anything else about any of these tools. If it works, i want you to use it, and i’m not going to tell you not to use it because you’re not using the other pieces of the same sex that’s the concept truly a toolbox reaching grab what works for you, and if you’re not oriented to its tools, think about it as a kitchen, you know, again, you know, if you have a, you know, one brand of, you know, say, blender and another brand of you’re not going to not use them to the same meal because the different brands you’re going to use, what you need now. You’re in my space because now i mean that’s for my easy bake oven days. Okay, right. The kitchenware. That’s. What if that’s why i went there? I can see that you is resonating with much more comfortable with spatulas than i am. Phillips head screwdriver. First time i used when i had to go to the emergency room that’s because you were trying to scrape a pan with so the book has ah, lot of model of of these tools talks about dahna maybe a dozen or so. Some of the simplest ones are you get what you measure results based accountability, even one from mckinsey and company capacity assessment tool. But maybe not those necessary. But a lot of the tools in the toolbox do emanate from corporate outcomes. Measurements. Some of the some of the latter ones. A lot of, you know, there’s. A lot of what are what? Why is it translatable? I mean, from for-profit tuna for-profit, you know, a lot of times not-for-profits community is worried about things that come from corporations. Yeah. Peter drucker. Except for money. Not a cz investigators, investors, but but now there is that fear. What were some of the less peter drucker made the comment that non-profit should be run more like business, and everyone thought that, you know, he was he was the prostate, and he was ah, heretical and my god, you know, corporations a big, nasty things, and after all we care, you know, we have a non-profit sector. The truth of the matter is that no one is more interested in outcomes in the corporate world. Now they tend to call the court that their outcomes profitability, market share, etcetera. But the idea is they’ve been leading the way literally since, you know henry ford was putting model tease out of on assembly line, there are tools, for example, like six sigma. There are tools that i said heaven saying, sabat against there are tools like six, six, six sigma six sigma. The question is what? The hell’s, a sigma and where the six of them that’s explained in the book it’s basically a measure of quality. All right, six sigma focuses on how many failure rates are there per million opportunities to fail. I mean, you don’t really have to get into that, but the concept is it has some key insight something for example, like t q m t q jargon jail. Oh, ok, you know, take your total quality, man. You know, i didn’t know what i mean, that’s what it cost him, and i’m not going to lock myself in jargon jail. What it means is critical to quality most non-profits when they’re designing a programme, do not ask this question, as the corporate world does with corporal world is launching and launching an effort, one of the first things under six sigma they would do is say, what is the most critical part of this that we need to have? If a non-profit were to adopt that kind of that kind of concept and that kind of analysis, it could go very, very far towards helping them focus on the most important parts of a program, the key things that they absolutely must have. But this is a perspective that is very often for into the non-profit space, but very, very built into the corporate space, particularly using something like six sigma, i see a future masters degree in non-profit outcomes engineering yet it’s perfect, exactly there’ll be exactly well, but when we have maybe a moment so we can talk about something called serve qual, which they’re using pizza hut, if you imagine, think a tool from pizza being used in the non-profit space now that’s that’s the suggestion that we talked about, regrettably, we’re out of moments right of moments. Well, the lesson is don’t be fearful of what comes from the non-profit from from the for-profit sector because these are all important, easily quantified things that corporations are focusing on, like earnings per share in a quarter, right? Exactly. And how do you get there? What do you need to do to get there? The book is the non-profit outcomes toolbox, a complete guide to program effectiveness, performance measurement and results published by wally wiley and sons, you’ll find robert penn is blogged at outcomes, outcomes toolbox, dot com robert, thank you very much for being on the show. A pleasure. Thank you very much for having it was a pleasure and enjoyed immensely. Thank you. Next week, september eleven giving what of the trends been? What can we expect going forward around that? My guest will be christine cronin, president of n y charities dot or ge? You can always keep up with what’s coming. Up on the show, sign up for our insider email alerts on the facebook page there’s a link to sign up and get those weekly alerts while you’re there, click like become a fan of the show, you can listen live or archive you’ve been listening live. You can listen archive on itunes subscribe and listen anytime, of course. 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049: The Morning After (The Big Event) & Giving USA 2011 Report – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Lisa Reilly, executive director, The Emelin Theatre
Tara Slone, principal, Marketing Matters
Jessica Weber, principal, Jessica Weber Design
Holly Hall, features editor, The Chronicle of Philanthropy
Robert Evans, editorial review board member, Giving USA

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://mpgadv.com

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Welcome to the show, this is tony martignetti non-profit radio, and i’m your aptly named host. We’re always talking about big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent help you were with me last week when i had a conversation with ken berger, president and ceo of charity navigator ken came on the show and announced charity navigator three point oh, we talked about the directions that cnn would like to move non-profits toward and how it’s inducing them to get there this week, the morning after the big event, three guests explain how best to follow-up your events and why it’s important to include follow-up plans in your pre event preparations. This is the first of my interviews from the exhibit floor at the fund-raising day conference in new york city last month. Then the e-giving yusa two thousand eleven report holly hall, features editor for the chronicle of philanthropy, will be with me to talk about her concerns from last year’s report and whether they’re answered in this year’s. This is a follow up to our discussion a few weeks ago on the show, then i’ll be joined by bob evans from the reports editorial board and he’ll share some important conclusions. Fromthe e-giving yusa two thousand eleven report in between the guests. As always, tony’s take two at roughly thirty two minutes into the hour. This month is the one year anniversary of the show, and we’re bringing on some regular monthly contributors, a team for legal compliance and a prospect research guru. I’ll introduce you to them on tony’s, take two. Also, if you’ve heard me speak and liked what you heard, that i’m going to ask for your help, both of those on tony’s take two in between today’s guests. Right now, we’ll take a break, and when we return, it’ll be the morning after the big event. E-giving didn’t think the ending the ending, depending. You’re listening to the talking alternate network e-giving. E-giving cubine. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Buy-in are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics politically expressed. I am montgomery taylor, and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com looking to meet mr and mrs wright, but still haven’t found the one i want to make your current relationship as fulfilling as possible. Then please join us, starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with morning alison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Please tune in and call as we discuss dating relationship and more. Start your week off with love in the morning with marnie alison on talking alternative dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven, we’re at the marriott marquis in new york city. My guests right now are lisa reilly, tara sloan and jessica weber. They’re seminar topic is provocatively the morning after the big event. Lisa riley is executive director of the ml in theatre. Tara sloane is principal of marketing matters limited, and jessica weber is the principle of jessica weber design incorporated. Ladies welcome murcott so let’s, start with you what hyre what? What can we do to extend the reach of events after the event is over? Well, i think there’s some sort of standard practices that we all think of as being kind of businesses, usual things, like remembering to thank our attendees after the event and one of the things that we suggested this morning is that it’s particularly useful if in that, thank you, you’re making sure that you’re still talking about the mission of your organization and that you’re extending the feel of the event and reiterating for people why they came to the event and what it was about, and we found in particular at the emlyn that one of the effective ways to do that is if you include a link to back to the website or to say there were pictures of the event to make sure that people have a reason to come back and look again at what you’re doing with these. Are you sending that? Thank you? Buy paper mail and also by email. So the link is wait, do about okay, terra is there a suggestion you’d liketo open with for extending the reach of events? Speak a lot closer, please. I think one of things we talked about is how important the pre planning for the post event is meaning planning in advance of the event. Who will do what? When the event is over. And while that’s often thought of as a boring task, it’s one of the most important it sounds like something that typically gets for gotten in planning for the event. Is that it’s? Not only for gotten but when it’s remembered the thought is, oh, we should have done this weeks ago. How could we have left this for you? Because the day after, people are excited about about what just occurred there, patting themselves on the bath about the event, but they’re not necessarily ready. Teo gear up the energy required for post event. So if the pieces have put into place before hand, they’re able it works much more successfully. Thank you. And jessica, what advice would you like to open with for extending the reach of events? Well, basically, we have a design from that only works in the not-for-profits sector. We encourage our clients to create brochures talking about their mission that are included in the event material and after the event, when lisa sends out a thank you letter to her attendees that she include a small brochure on the organization and some giving pieces so that the e-giving opportunity keeps going on after the events over really so it’s appropriate to include a solicitation material in the thank you for coming sometimes it is absolute terror is nodding. Also, please support it’s definitely important and it’s it’s really critical because we would assert that events are not just about the event it’s about building a relationship with all of the people who attended the event. So one of the ways in which which you build the relationship is immediate communication, post event and inviting. Them to support the great cause that they attended the event. Ok. And lisa, in your work with ml in you don’t get objections to solicitation material it’s included in the in the thank you for coming, we’re actually i think it is organization specific, and we’re a little sneaky about it. Good. Well, let’s, talk about it on dh. What we do is our event is near the beginning of our season. We have our event big event in october, which is the beginning of the m ellen’s performing arts season, so our thank you asks them to come to the theater when they come to the theatre, we asked them to give money so rather than including the asked directly in the thank you, we know that we’re going to have other opportunities to continue to build. That relationship is, tara says on one of the ways we want to build that relationship is to encourage them to be at the theater often. Okay, so, tara, let me ask you the same question that since you’re advocating this, your clients are not getting objections to solicitation material sent in the thank you, i think, if if it is done tactfully it works on clients are not objecting and remember that many of the people who are attending the events are guests of other people so they may not have. They may not have necessarily made a contribution yet individually, so this gives them the opportunity to just get sound like you want to say something about doing this tactfully, inappropriately, and another way of doing that is also to send out a newsletter a month or two after the event, to all the attendees with pictures of the event and talking about it so that you start to capture a family of friends it’s really important when you have an event to capture the people who are there to make friends for life, and by doing a newsletter every three or four months, it gets that across, and we also include e-giving envelope in the news, all right, but let’s talk a little more detail about that that first thank you that they get afterwards doing that, including a solicitation in that and doing it tactfully, appropriately what’s your advice for for that first communication after the event, well, usually the development director of the executive director will send a personal note thanking them for their attendance and personally signed, never a mass mailing. Absolutely even if there’s seven hundred fifty people, even if they’re seven hundred, the waldorf seven, because basically, how often do you get astounded when you actually get a hand written letter with a stamp on it these days? You know, it kind of knocks you out because everything is pre printed, so that little personal note with a real stamp means a lot to donors, okay? And about a terrible i just would like to suggest that one way to do a mass email let’s, say and make it meaningful is to give the guests of the event ideas ways in which the funds will be used. So talk to talk about the specifics, programmatic elements of the agency and let so in other words, for so and so amount of money you are contributing to support this cause, they’re program that we have for the next level, this is what you’re so that really makes it more personal and compelling beyond that would be something that they get right after the event terror right after the event, ok? Yeah, you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Geever are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three that’s to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set to one, two, nine six four three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom two, one two, nine, six, four, three five zero two. We make people happy. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com lisa, are you spending any time at the event preparing attendees for the follow-up that that the theater is going to send? Well, we make because it is the beginning of our season, a big part of what i speak about it. The event is what’s going to happen at the theater over the coming months, so they know that they’re going that we want time to attend, but also that we need their support to make those events happen. And so there is a kind of, um, nuanced, i guess, you know, sort, subtle pitch to say to people that this this kind of work which is meaningful in our community doesn’t happen unless we have your support, and so part of your support is coming to the gala, but the next part of your support is attending the events and and picking some of these very specific projects. So, for example, last year, the theater needed a new protector because we have a film siri’s and saying to the gal audience, you can help, and this will make a real difference in how we can deliver our programs. Jessica, do you have advice on that about the same? Question i asked lisa preparing people at the event for the follow-up that’s that’s going to come? Wait do advise our clients were basically a design from we’re not a development firm so good. So that it’s usually our development director that will tell us what they need created to soon? Yes, in terms of design of the of the evening. Exactly. Did you have something, please? Yeah, so i just like to add that part of what i was, what i was opening with a minute ago was the idea of how the pre event planning, how important it is, and by working with the event committee and the board in advance of the event to determine what next steps might occur. For example, we might have a parlor events at so and so’s home planting, planning and then planting the seeds for those events at the main event. So in other words, tony, you’re you know, we’re going to invite you in a few weeks to join a mission coming to learn more, and it could be learned more about the agency or it could be we’re going to give you more value because we’re going to deliver. Some content that’s relevant to the mission of the organization, you’ll be interested in hearing this. I’m gonna shift a little bit what’s your advice, anybody about a situation where you have, uh, chair of an event, and i’m now i’m thinking bigger event, not like you were just talking about lisa tower, maybe a parlor event, but something larger and really all the all that chair is willing to do is share their vendor list and show up that night and share the event they’re not motivated around all the planning and to are to the point of your seminar, the post event work. Anybody have advice for that? Working with difficult chair who has to be the chair? Well, i think in the m ellen’s case, what we try to do is build a strong committee, so that because it certainly does happen that there are sometimes prominent people who are for one reason and others selected to chair an event who either are unwilling or unable just to spare the time to do the kind of rigorous, detail oriented work that needs to be done. And so we find a larger committee who will commit themselves to that kind of detail work that’s also the work of the board, frankly, so we prepare our board to say, you know, part of their job is to go to the gala and have fun, but another part of it is that they’re out talking to people about what we’re doing, and i think another way you can think about that is when, for example, of boardmember is engaged with someone who says, i really like the dance siri’s at the emblen one of the things that boardmember is doing is cultivating that person as a donor, coming back to the staff, coming back to the board and saying, you know, joe told me he really likes the dance siri’s, how do we make sure that joe’s engaged in the dance siri’s so there’s lots. I think there are lots of ambassadors, and the chair is a very visible ambassador, but not the only ambassador. Actually, we’re going to that. Come back to the committee in a second with lisa reilly, tara sloan and jessica weber. We’re talking about their seminar at at fund-raising day two thousand eleven, which is the morning after the big event. Let’s talk more about the committee the committee is critical. Jessica, what did you want to add to the sum a committee? It is critical to helping the organization get the event off the ground, whether it be working with the auction, the silent auction, even when we designed all the graphics there’s, always someone on the committee who we work with to make sure that the designs we create reflect the evening and each i mean, i’ve sat personally on many committees and it’s imperative that you get a really active goodcompany he’s. So let’s talk about that who’s best to talk about recruiting the right committee, who wants to go ahead. So in terms of the right committee, i would assert that it’s really important to have people who represent the different target segments of your population. So whether that’s from a geography standpoint, you have people on the committee who represent different geography is or you have people who are different ages representing different prospects and current supporters that you really think through, make sure the committee is representative of the people you want the agency to read, to be able to reach out to, okay and understanding at the same time with respect what lisa said, that they may be supplementing a chair who’s unable or unwilling to do a lot of the heavy lifting. Yes. And in addition, while there is often one share, there are ways in which to have journal chairs or committee chairs so that you’re giving that chair roll to more than one person, particularly in the situation where thie it may be that one of the chairs is in name only since the topic of your seminar is extending the reach of the event let’s switch to ah smaller event may be it is a parlor event elearning half a dozen or a dozen couples in someone’s home is the is extending the reach of that event different than the larger seven hundred fifty people in the waldorf. This aria is there. Is there more any more personal approach? Because it was an event with just twelve or twenty twenty people. How do we, uh, how do we follow-up to those smaller, more intimate events? So i think the smaller events you have fewer people to connect with and you have a more personal experience and more of a one on one with the people who attended so it’s very easy to pick up the phone so a phone call and find out what it was interesting to the guest about the organization and what they’re interested in going forward learning, knowing, supporting, okay, but doing it by phone. Lisa does emelin host small events like that? We do have some smaller events, and in one sense every performance that we hosted the theater is a smaller event, and one of the things that we found is very important at the theatre is that someone either myself or one of the board members welcomes thie audience on dh makes a real pitch for people to be actively engaged, whether that’s e-giving time or money or bringing coming to another event. I think one of the challenges in a small organization is people sometimes are a little hesitant to make the ask and sort of closed the loop. And to me, when you say, you know, what’s, the difference between a big event and a small event at our smaller events, the real challenge is to make sure that we have said very specifically we need you and we need you to give and we need your time and that can feel difficulty in a smaller room than in a bigger room. But it’s absolutely the reason tohave a smaller event and making sure that that actually happens both at the event and after the event, and plus the people you invite to those smaller events are typically more committed, or and maybe you’re asking them to bring someone who doesn’t know the organization very well, and that might that might be a strategy for broadening the reach, right, it’s all about personal relation in ship. So if the person who invited them is a dear friend or family member, they are more likely to be very positive. Lee predisposed to getting a phone call or personal touch from the director of the organization who their loved one cares very much about jessica. Thanks, tara. What about use of social media? Can you can you talk? I know you know you’re work is designing the event. What are you thinking about using social media in extending the events? Reach? It really depends on the size of the organization and if they can, in fact support social media, we have larger clients who have someone completely. Devoted to it, who’s writing the block whose our problem is that if an organization doesn’t have the manpower to support it, there’s nothing worse than going and seeing a block with six months old right here. This is a lot of apologies were sorry for not blogging sooner. More and more recently, for junior committees, i think social networking is fabulous when some of our groups are clients have junior committees and junior memberships, they social media is the way to go to connect for them and most of their invitations or invites great since you you please dara. Increasingly, i think facebook is a must have for an event and the earlier that you get the facebook page live and the more people that you can get to friend the page, the more valuable it is and it’s interesting, because just a few years ago i didn’t even exist, you know, now we’re having a contest. We’re giving away three ipads outsourced to ipads at three thirty, so if you each like the facebook page before you leave, which were set up to do right here, you can join the contest. He’s a younger events jessica raised that elisa, are you are you cultivating people in their twenties and say up to mid thirties and emily very much we are, i think that that’s ah difficulty audience for performing arts organizations in particular, tio teo, particularly the suburbs, perhaps to garner there are very they certainly are very different about how they engage with social media and print media. Where, just tell us, where is the evelyn theater? We’re in westchester, so we’re just north of new york city in a town called mamaroneck. Wait for it all that’s, not it’s, not upstate new york it’s not upstate, but it is not below fourteenth street. People from the city think of it as a lot of people from the city think of his upstate. I live in the city, but i don’t think of that, all right? So younger people in the suburbs not so much coming out for theatre, not so much to a performing arts centers. They i think there’s a different way that younger people engaged with the arts. They are more likely, for example, to go to a club somewhere where they can move and dance and interact as opposed to sitting in a seat and watching something happened, andi that’s not just true in the suburbs that’s if you look at places like the ninety second street y here in the city, you’ll see that they’re discounts for younger attendees because it is a challenge to get people below a certain age to engage in that particular format. Andi, i think they’re uneven. Bigger challenge, frankly, to engage in your fundraising efforts. Your work is designing events. Let’s, talk about designing events, jessica for people in their twenties. What do your thoughts there? Well, we just did something that was a skating thing in woman woman drink it was very successful. It was for one of our clients who only wanted to reach out to thirty and unders, and we didn’t even fight. There was facebook page and it was very well attended. It was a way of getting younger new yorkers to get involved with in this case is the new york city police foundation, and slowly, we’re hoping that the organization will nurture them so that they’ll become bigger and bigger contributors, and most of the time these events are not very expensive two hundred fifty dollars or less, they invite their friends and it’s, a way of store getting them into become donors, you know, it’s, a way of educating them. So one. One of the things that we think about do is that building thie relationships is all about building a tribe of people who care goldenburg tribe and the so to build that younger tribe, you need a few key younger people who care about the organization and reaching them. And identifying them is a one on one conversation. Jessica weber, lisa reilly and tara sloane there. Seminar topic was the morning after the big event. I want to thank you very much for joining tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the fund-raising day conference two thousand eleven. Ladies, thank you very much. Thank you, thank you. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed hi and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping huntress people be better business people. Oppcoll hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome back, it’s, time for tony’s take two at roughly thirty two minutes after the hour. This month is the one year anniversary for the show, and i’m really pleased, excited tio bring on some regular contributors to the show. Of course we have scott koegler who’s, our tech contributor he’s, the editor of non-profit technology news, and he joins us once a month. Teo, help explain technology and it’s used for non-profits so we’re going to bring on some additional experts one set in july, and then someone in august joining me starting on july twenty ninth is going to be jean takagi and emily chan. They are both attorneys, the their practices, the non-profit and exempt organizations, law group or neo-sage is in san francisco, and jean is also the publisher of the non-profit law blawg, dot com and emily is a frequent contributor to that block again, they’ll be with me first show on july twenty ninth. Then on august twelfth, i’ll be welcoming another regular contributor, prospect research expert maria simple maria is the prospect finder, and you’ll find her at the prospect finder dot com she’s goingto share prospect research advice for your non-profit and she also will be on once a month again. First show august twelfth have you heard me speak and have you liked it? Check out my block post, which is called have you heard me speak and liked it? That’s an m p g a d v dot com someone is compiling a list of the best speakers in philanthropy, and i’d be grateful to have your vote. The details are at that block post on my block, and that is tony’s take two for friday, july eighth. Coming on now is holly hol. Holly is features editor for the chronicle of philanthropy, welcoming her back to the show. Holly welcome back, pleasure to have you thank you. Glad to be here. Thanks. We’re talking about the e-giving yusa two thousand eleven report. So just to recap from your last appearance on this show in in june, there were some concerns we talked about from the two thousand ten report, which was on two thousand nine’s e-giving can you just recap a little bit? Yes, e-giving you say estimated that individual e-giving help study in two thousand nine and declined overall for total giving by all sources by just a small percentage point. And we thought that that was a little suspicious given our calls all over the country, showing much steeper declines in two thousand eight and nine. Okay, so this year, giving us a came out and has revised figures for, oh eight and nine and so now they’re reporting a cumulative thirteen point two percent drop in a way, and nine cumulative droppin await no nine. And how much of a drop from oh eight. Two o nine. Because that was the that was the two thousand ten report on two thousand nine giving. So what was the well? Okay, it was there now saying in a six point two percent down adjusted for inflation and no nine and another seven percent down in eight that’s a cumulative thirteen point two percent. Okay, it was the steepest drop in the fifty six, um year old survey. Okay, so it’s saying that e-giving is not quite as resilient as we thought in in a recession or in a battle bad economic time generally that’s, right? Ok, because the belief had been that it was quite resilient. But then how does that compare to the to the downturn? Let’s? Say, in the dow or, you know, in another stock into season. It’s. Not as bad as that that’s. True. First of all, i think we all have to keep in mind these air. Just estimate. And we may never know how much e-giving fell. But it is. Nice to see that that these figures have been adjusted to be more in line with what many organizations experience during the recession on, and it wasn’t just your chronicle philanthropies research, but there were other organisations as well that we’re saying that e-giving had declined considerably from a wayto nine yes, sir been several studies that show that on the council for aid education found a steep drop e-giving colleges and universities, thie association for health care philantech be found a double digit decrease e-giving um and ironically, the shevawn philantech rezone research wealthy individuals found that the wealthy decrease their giving by large margins as well. There was also concerned because two advisers to e-giving yusa, professors service and havens, schervish and havens i had questioned the two thousand ten report after they did some of their own research on two thousand nine giving we talked about this a couple of weeks ago you and i and they had factored in consumer confidence and unemployment have you seen any change in the methodology? It’s giving us a tow to factor in variables like that? Yeah, state. It’d make a change to look at patterns of personal consumption. I asked them why they didn’t use consumer confidence, and they said that they would much rather look at actual spending rather than confident. They thought that a better measure, okay, and how about unemployment and any measure of that variable? They didn’t look at that, okay, are they not o k now, we didn’t invite someone from giving us a talk about the methodology of the report, and they weren’t able to do that on. We do have bob evans coming, but he’s going to talk about the editorial side of the report, not the methodology side he’ll be on shortly. Holly, were there other things that you were looking for in this year’s report on? Did you find them just the correction? They now show that giving in twenty ten increased by about two percent. But that’s it still far from making up for the thirteen over thirteen percent drop that was found for the two years of recession? Sure, but we’re still not back to where we were. Another interesting thing about the survey is they showed that corporate giving corporate support went up, and that does not really but dive with what we hear anecdotally, and it totally. Corporate giving is very challenging for many groups, and they still haven’t recovered losses that they endured during the recession years. One possible explanation for that. Maybe that companies are donating more products. In-kind donations. Non-cash. Okay, e-giving in different ways, in-kind and maybe volunteerism to, i think, is one of the conclusions than cash. Holly. We have to leave it there. I want to thank you very much for summarizing and coming back on the show and following up, thank you very much. Thank you, tony pleasure. Holly halls, the features editor at the chronicle of philanthropy with me now is bob evans. Bob is founder and managing director of the hl consulting group, but he’s here in his capacity as a member of the editorial review board of giving yusa bob evans welcome to the show. Good morning, pleasure with pleasure to have you. Thank you, thanks for joining us. E-giving yusa has ten pretty pretty firm conclusions based on it’s ah, it’s research. Why don’t you just remind the audience what the methodology is, what the process is generally behind e-giving yusa and then we’ll get into a couple of these conclusions that you have e-giving us favorite. Very. Data from a variety of sources, including the i r s and and it would be a reflection of friends in america in every nation. Lovely, elegant about general figures, a revised and additional agents and data that the irs from for-profit filing vigils and patient foundation. But accurate. Careful analysis, general. In fact, bob bob, i’m going to interrupt you. Would you would you mind hanging up, please, and calling right back? We have awful connection. Okay, thank you very much. This is bob evans, he’s on the editorial board of the e-giving yusa report and he’s, unfortunately, cutting out kind of badly, he was saying that it is an annual report and it is revised twice. So azali hall pointed out the the each report is an estimate. So we want to be fair to giving yusa recognizing each report is an estimate, and then they do revise their numbers. Twice after the initial report, a cz bob evans was saying, bob, you back with us? Okay? I’m hoping we have a better connection. Let’s move to some of the conclusions about e-giving one of those is that americans remained generous in difficult economic times. What? What? What? Leads the e-giving usa and e-giving institute, the sponsors of the over report. Teo, conclude that even though it’s been a great fashion over the last several years, america funded credibly, where there were hills forgiving and kills for make failed at all of this. Bob, but i’ll tell you what way have awful connection. You’re just, you’re not coming through again, out let’s, do this. We’re gonna take a quick break. The producer will call you and give you some some advice about how may we can improve this. So so why did you hang up? We’re going to take a break, and when we return, it’ll be bob evans talking about giving yusa two thousand eleven report stay with us. I didn’t think that shooting the good ending things, you’re listening to the talking, alternate network duitz get in. I think. Cubine looking to meet mr and mrs wright, but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your current relationship as fulfilling as possible? Then please join us, starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with morning alison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Please tune in and call as we discuss dating relationship and more. Start your week off with love in the morning with marnie alison on talking alternative dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio friday’s one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting do you want to enhance your company’s web presence with an eye catching and unique website design? Would you like to incorporate professional video marketing mobile marketing into your organization’s marketing campaign? Mission one on one media offers a unique marketing experience. I will set you apart from your competitors, magnify your brand exposure and enhance your current marketing effort. Their services include video production and editing, web design, graphic design photography, social media management and now introducing mobile marketing. Their motto is. We do whatever it takes to make our clients happy. Contact them today. Admission one one media dot com talking. Bonem metoo welcome back, we think we’ve got technical problems solved and a much better connection with bob evans. Bob, you still there, right? I’m here. Ok, that is much, much better. This is an important point, so i’m actually going to just ask you to repeat what you had said about the giving us a report conclusion that americans remained generous in difficulty. Economic times. Americans have never shied away from giving to legitimate non-profits across united states and in fact, across the globe, uh, two hundred ninety one billion dollars were restricted to non-profits during two thousand him according to the giving us a report. And even though that’s a slight uptick from what was deceived or reprogram reported both in two thousand eight and two thousand nine, this is a great testimonial, two american generosity, no other country, no other group of people anywhere on the planet given generously give us frequently and give us passionately as what has been the result over the last year. And i think this is something that is to be highlighted e-giving is a certain it is certainly an important part of the us economy and i respond. People respond when called upon. And where there is a n’importe need to balance, i think you heard holly hall. She was on just before you there was ah declined a thirteen percent roughly declined a cumulative decline in two thousand eight in two thousand nine because of the recession, i have admitted, you know, that there’s a, uh, impact on the economy that does reflect in terms of e-giving but still e-giving was very serious component of the us economy, and that will not vanish. Another conclusion is that planned e-giving must and that’s that’s the reports word must be incorporated into fund-raising plant e-giving of course, the long term giving through wills and charitable trusts, charitable annuities? Why does the report conclude that plan giving is so important approximately eight percent of all giving in america? I came from the plant giving or the quest in two thousand ten, so we’re talking about twenty three billion dollars worth of, uh, support for non-profits this is more than corporate giving and is very serious effort, especially as baby boomers are aging and as americans are aging, that one of the things that were saying to non-profits across america is that you must incorporate a plan e-giving component into your fund-raising master plan if you’re not concern cering plans giving, you are really going to be left out in the er the wild, because this is such an important part of activity. But now the colleges and universities of america have really been working the baby boomer population and it’s starting to pay off handsomely for them in the form of a request. Okay, that eight percent figure that you cited that’s eight percent of total giving or eight percent of the individual giving number it’s eight percent of all giving in america. Okay, and i think these first two conclusions that we’re talking about that americans as individuals remain generous on dh, that plan giving must be incorporated, that that points to the importance of individual giving. And in fact, when one of the things that we say is that eighty, eighty seven percent of all giving in america truly comes from individuals living in bed because a certain percentage of foundation giving and be attributed to individuals and a certain percentage of corporate e-giving can be attributed individual, and you’re able to tease that out in the reports and for us, yeah, yeah. So that’s the week day, eighty seven percent of all giving comes from individuals living in bed. Okay? And that includes the foundation and corporate support that individuals are responsible for definitely a component of corporate giving and a component of foundation giving indefinitely, and the foundation support was not reduced as much as foundations had threatened or thought would be the case. We had expected much deeper cuts by federation by foundations in two thousand ten, primarily because foundation many foundations, especially large one stepped up during the great profession with larger than expected support for non-profit projects and causes uh, because most foundations use a three, four or five year rolling average in terms of return on their principal, we had expected much deeper decline from foundations. But thankfully, wall street cooperated and the portfolios of foundations uh, we were able to recover very significantly from the downturns of two thousand eight and nine. So the non-profit world on received much stronger support than we would have projected. I think that this will be a question mark that also will continue for another year or two as foundation portfolio. Try to recover what they had lost during the great recession what’s. The proportion of total giving that foundation support contributes foundation support his response for forty one billion dollars, or about fourteen percent of the pie for two thousand ten. And just curious. How does that compare with corporate support? Corporate support is only five. Okay, so that it that again, when you add individual giving, which seventy three percent request e-giving which is eight percent foundations fourteen percent in corporate at five, one hundred percent, you know? And we have just about a minute and a half before we have to close arts and culture giving so increases. What can you tell us about that? I think culture go up and down like a yo yo, especially because of very large e-giving both from individuals, dam’s foundations. In two thousand ten, our cultures saw a larger piece of the pie. Five for them was four percent. And we think this is a good sign about future support for the arts in america. But that increase was due to some, i guess, a few very large gifts. So there’s. Very, very large. Uh, which is also what impact this category of the ten categories. All right, so so that may mean for most arts and culture organizations, unless they were among the few who got some of these large gifts. They may not be feeling that that increase that’s, right, but it’s been is a mentality here is that we believe has turned around, and we’re especially optimistic and are telling that our clients that they have to work harder and ah, very directly with donors at all levels but were especially out to think about that category. Bob evans is founder, managing director of the e e h l consulting group, and he was sharing his expertise a za member of the editorial review board of giving yusa bob, thank you very much for your time. My pleasure, it’s been a pleasure having you i want to thank lisa reilly, tara sloan and jessica weber from fund-raising day two thousand eleven on dh, letting us replay that interview from from june and also, of course, holly hall from the chronicle of philanthropy and bob evans from the editorial review board of giving yusa next week. Partnerships, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions sandra lamb of lamb advisers talks about collaborations of all kinds between non-profits when are they? Write for you when should your board be talking about? Um, how do you decide what organizations to collaborate with and what’s the process, then engaging generations x? And why leslie goldman and casey rotter from the us fund for unicef share their expertise in this area. They are both in those generations, but i did not ask their ages all of next week’s guests were recorded at the fund-raising day conference in new york city last month, and in the coming weeks i’ll have even more of those conversations from fund-raising day you can keep up with what’s coming up by signing up for our insider email alerts, go to the facebook page, facebook, dot com and then the name of this show sign up there for the alerts and, like us, become a fan of the show, you can listen to the show anytime on the device of your choice by subscribing on itunes, and you’ll find our itunes paige at non-profit radio dot net, the creative producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is clear meyerhoff today’s line producer and the owner of talking alternative broadcasting is sam liebowitz. Our social media is by regina walton of organic social media. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio for july eighth, two thousand eleven. I hope you’ll be with me on july fifteenth, two thousand eleven, right here on talking alternative broadcasting, always at talking alternative dot com. I didn’t think that shooting the ending. Cubine you’re listening to the talking, alternate network. Things get e-giving duitz looking to meet mr and mrs wright but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your car relationship as fulfilling as possible? Then please join us starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with morning alison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Please tune in and call as we discuss dating relationship and more start your week off with love in the morning with marnie alison on talking alternative dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? 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016: Savvy Strategies for Your Search & How To Cripple Your Career In 5 Easy Steps – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Paula Marks, managing director at Gilbert Tweed International
Robert Sharpe, president of The Sharpe Group

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://mpgadv.com