453: Manage Your Programs With A CRM & Co-Learning For Your Programs – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

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This week: 

First, I fired a listener. Then . . . 

Manage Your Programs With A CRM 
The right CRM can help you run day-to-day program operations: track client relationships and outcomes; host trainings; manage certifications; organize transportation; and more. Our panel was recorded at 19NTC and they’re Jake Grinsted from Simply 360; Leah Kopperman with Keshet; Kai Williams at The International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council; and Medha Nanal from Top Cloud Consulting. 

Co-Learning For Your Programs 
This 19NTC panel encourages you to look at a more collaborative training culture, which pushes the bounds of who is the educator. They’re Debra Askanase at Oracle NetSuite; LaCheka Phillips with TechSoup/NGOsource and Kevin Martone from JCamp180. 

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

448: Your Crowdfunding Campaign & CRM + Email + Website – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

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This week: 

Your Crowdfunding Campaign
Most crowdfunding campaigns don’t make goal. What are the common denominators for failure and success? Moshe Hecht answers all, and shares his organizational readiness checklist to get you prepared for success. He’s chief innovation officer at Charidy. (Recorded at 19NTC)

CRM + Email + Website 
You’ll learn more about the people engaging with you when your CRM, email and website are integrated and talking to each other. We’ll leave you with a plan for getting these technologies together. My guest, also from 19NTC, is Isaac Shalev, president of Sage70. 

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

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Hello and welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit Radio. Big non-profit ideas for the other 95%. I’m your aptly named host. Oh, I’m glad you’re with me. I’d turn pseudo referees if you made me sweat with the idea that you missed today’s show Your crowdfunding campaign. Most crowdfunding campaigns don’t make goal. What are the common denominators for failure and success? We she Hecht answers all and shares his organizational readiness checklist to get you prepared for success. He’s chief innovation officer at charity that’s recorded at 19 NTC and C R M plus email plus website. You’ll learn more about the people engaging with you when you’re C R M E mail and Web site are integrated and talking to each other. We’ll leave you with a plan for getting these technologies together. My guest also ferment 19. NTC is Isaac Shalev, president of Sage 70 Attorneys Take two. Show number 450 were sponsored by Wagner. C. P A’s guiding you beyond the numbers regular cps dot com by koegler Mountain Software Denali Fund. Is there complete accounting solution specifically for non-profits tourney dot m a slash Cougar Mountain for a free 60 day trial and by turn to communications. Full service, strategic communications and PR turn hyphen to dot CEO. Here is your crowdfunding campaign. Welcome to Tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of 19 NTC. That’s the 1920 19 non-profit technology Conference. We’re in Portland, Oregon, at the convention center. All of our 1990 seasoned reviews are brought to you by our partners at ActBlue Free fund-raising Tools for helping non-profits to make an impact. I’m joined down by mushy Hecht. He is the chief innovation officer at charity. That’s with a D. On his topic is why your crowdfunding campaign might fail and how to avoid it. Welcome, mushy. Thank you. Thank you, Tony, for having me on the show. It’s a pleasure. Pleasure. Um, what’s the work at the charity? So we are a crowdfunding platform and consulting service. So we help non-profits run their e-giving days crowdfunding campaigns, and we do the entire back office service for them. So we’ll give them the platform, and then we will give them a a team of marketing specialists and fund-raising consultants to help them succeed in their crowdfunding campaigns. Okay, so your first step in making sure your crowdfunding campaign doesn’t fail might be to engage charity. That’s right. Oh, man. What a free from I just give you 30,000 listeners, and I’m not gonna charge you. You didn’t ask for it, so I’m not going. Um, okay, it should be pretty simple. You got a lot of ideas around. Reasons why these things might I’m over modulating. Why these things might fail. Um, give us some some stats. Most do. Bye fail. You mean not make goal, I presume. Let’s define our terms. So that xero Yeah, that’s a great That’s a great way to start. So yeah. Okay, so the industry would would, you know, measures it by, you know, you set a campaign goal, and then you don’t reach your campaign goal. And that has about a 2/3 of campaigns. Don’t succeed across crowdster have very broad metric. If you go a little deeper into it’s a personal cause. Crowdfunding campaigns success rate is actually much lower than that. We go into non-profits or a little bit hyre. You’re going to creative creative campaigns for businesses and products. They’ll be somewhere depending What platform? Some Some state, 44% success rate, somewhere lower. Um, it’s not great. The success rate is not great and mostly judged by reaching the goal. Now, in our talk, I spoke about a different metric, which is probably more accurate and more helpful metric to of what failure means. Okay, so if you think about and you try to zone in and what did the essential difference between let’s go modern crowdfunding and, you know, just a classic fund-raising. Okay, so before modern crowdfund e-giving at some really great ways to fund-raising direct direct No, you know, you know, face-to-face solicitations, events, andan, even email marketing as of late and social Media Marketing has a laser all great tools to fund-raising to get in front of people into engage and solicit donations. I would, um, I in my view and in my experience, essential core difference of why you would okay, do a crowdfunding. I mean, if you got all those other options, is that when you when you set out to do a crowdfunding campaign, Essentially, what you’re trying to accomplish is to hit a tipping point that the campaign the crowd from the campaign will be so effective that it reaches a threshold. And over that threshold, it reaches a certain Momenta Mme that you don’t need a push it anymore. And it has a life of its own, right? So think about some of the most popular crowdfunding campaigns that we don’t know about what we call us when we, uh, you reach a you reach, um, you have your pioneers, you’re early adopters, and then you reach early majority. That’s right. Tipping point. I’m glad. Yes, Malcolm. So it’s it’s funny mentioned that my entire talk was actually is based on sort of the narrative that we’ve created through for the presentation to make it a little bit, you know, easier to understand is I based it on the Mountain Gladwell book. Oh, on the on the fundamentals. And that book came out in 2000 19 years later. The fundamentals of that book are still very true and can be used as an analogy for what it takes to reach a tipping point. And that’s really what you’re setting out to do, because otherwise just go to classic other ways. Just why put in the work in the effort to try to do a craft in-kind every single Exactly. You gotta start using direct mail to get people to donate to your crowdfunding campaign. Just write a letter, a solicitation letter, eggs. Every single dollar is a struggle, right? So the possibilities is really what you know of this, you know, uber connected world, this World wide web of goodness and kindness that we live in the possibilities of hitting, attempting a tipping point of having the campaign go well beyond your own abilities to take on a life of its own is really what we’re trying to accomplish. So I would say that there’s actually if you use that metric as as as failure, it’s actually a lot more than 2/3. It’s just that that’s hard to measure. Weight have to be really do granular analysis of what can I get? Lots of campaigns and how they trended and over over what beer time. Okay, but yeah, if you apply that measure, I’m sure it’s. But it’s not much worse, less less than 1/3 succeeding Okay. Ah, so what are what’s the best way to? We just dive in and say, What’s the number one? Well, I I thought of something. After all, what’s the number one reason campaigns failed, So there isn’t one reason. And number one number one, what’s the top reason? It’s gotta be a top reason. So mote many of you. Well, what I would say. Probably a top if I had to choose. The top reason is a lack preparation. I’m asking you, like a lack of preparation and the infrastructure set up right in for up front. Okay. What we do, What do you need to do up front? Very good. So you’re getting me through the top? Didn’t you see the questions I gave you before? So, Tony, tell me, um, it’s time for a break. Weather, cps, their accountants. You know what they do. For goodness sake. You’ve heard me say this. You know what CPS do? C p a. Certified public accountants. Do you need one? Do you need a firm? You need a couple, whatever you need. You know what they do? Check them out first at wagner cps dot com. And then you know what to do after that. Pick up the phone, talk to you. Eat duitz. Doom the partner. He’ll tell you whether Wagner CPS can help you. Regular cps dot com Now back to bushy Hecht and your crowdfunding campaign. So that’s actually a good question. Once the number one reason, Yeah. Lack of preparation, I think, um, people they see so we see a lot of graph looks easy, right? It looks like a kn accident. Do it. Do a do a 32nd selfie video. I go on to kickstarter or go fund me. What? According to you, what? What? My intentions are what my goal is what I’m raising money for. And, uh, and then and then people just come like we thought about web sites in 1990 to build it, and everybody will come to it. Not gonna happen. Yeah, doesn’t happen. So there are, um, a few core ingredients that need to go. It’s a new set of we’re talking about upfront, prepped on infrastructure. And these are I would say, these are fresh tools that non-profits need to learn. Okay, um and maybe individually, some of them are, you know, classic tools. But combining them together is really where the magic happens. The glue that brings them all together, that creates that, you know, sort of velocity That helps a campaign take off those two and these air. And I say they’re fresh tools, because there, you know, they’re the these are part of this is possible. I believe that. You know, we hear a lot of saying, like, you know, don’t try to do a, you know, ice bucket challenge for your organization, right? It’s just not realistic. And that’s actually, you know, if if consultant would tell you that I would say the streets looking out for you, he’s not trying to set you up for you. No unrealistic expectations. But I have a bit of a different view in the way my experience on what might what? What I do for a living is we actually work to reverse engineer a an ice bucket challenge and say, What were the ingredients that went into the ice bucket challenge even though it happened by accident again? Okay, organically. It’s not like someone came together. All right, we’re gonna raise under $50,000,000. We’re gonna get the entire world plus the president down. Bill Gates, everything. Here’s the plan. Follow blueprint. Do it. But l s had some things in place. Well, they’re so there. So not with not with this intention. I would say it doesn’t like that so I would say we’ll study. It doesn’t matter. Meaning whether the things happened by accident or they happened with intention. Doesn’t matter. Just tell me, what were those that they were in place? No, no, I understand that. Yeah, I agree. Yes. So they’re making it clear that they didn’t set him up with the intention of exactly Because that’s country what you’re talking about. Yeah. So? So what we’ve done is what was already so number one, Let’s go through a mountain labbate. Okay, Number one is the power of the few. Okay, so we know about you know, the power few 80 20 rule When it comes to fund-raising grayce absentee money is coming from 20% to you people. 20% of ah, you know, 20% of your people should be giving 80% your money, right? And we use this says as a methodology for fund-raising. Rarely do we use it as a methodology for involuntary engagement and for soliciting people to become ambassadors and influencers for your organization. Where we say Okay, well, if we’re trying to get to the message, we should just engage with the mass masses. But the reality is is that it works the same way with volunteer engagement. Getting people to advocate for organization is first, find the power of the few. Find the power of those. The column, the the influencers, your power. Your have power on social media. Exactly. So so glad. Will breaks it down into into into three different types of people. Connectors, mavens and sales people. Right. So today we call them influencers, right? And they but influencers have varying degrees of these attributes, you know? So Ah, connectors like you going to a party. And you’re like, you know, how’d you get here, Laura? You know, she, uh, Lauren bradunas. She invited me to You walked through the room. Heroes at Laura basically was, like, had something to do with everyone invited to the party. Right. You’re going to a conference in Portland, you know? Oh, you have to meet Laura. She’s gonna be there. You gotta meet Tony. You gotta get on the show. You know, everyone’s on his show like these air connectors. That’s not a hypothetical. No, no, that’s that’s really you’re connected. And you’re also maybe even be a maven. Maybe even a sale of herself. Disgusting. You’re made in first. Everything I don’t want to say I’m a whore. Everything. Oh, my God. There’s a lot of Yeah, So there’s a lot of obviously that there’s crossover at some people. Could be like a professional something, And they’re also a bit of a connector. But essentially, it’s influencers. Right? But influencers, you know, today we know the Miss Influences, and they’re like, OK, instagram influencers, they sort of They become formalized and formulated into an actual career. Right? But it’s not just the professional way. Gotta move this long. You have a lot of tips were only on the 1st 1 so number. So you know what? No, I do wanna go deeper on this before before we leave it, but I’m directing you that we got, uh I wanted to get specific. What do you do with these influences first? First you gotta identify them. There are companies that I can help you sort through your all your social contact if you give them your email. Maybe charity does that. I don’t know, but you get enough of a free promotion. I’m not gonna let you say whether you do it or not. Maybe you do maybe you don’t go to charity dot com. She could find out beyond that. So you’ve identified your influencers? What do you do it before your campaign? You You Well, you empower them to be a springboard and a messaging board for your organization. So say you’re a school, okay? And you identify, um, an educator in the community, right? That who’s a maven in the community, which happens to be a parent, right? And you, you you engage with that person and say, Listen, we’re doing the campaign, and we’re raising money for this in this new program. And you happen to be a professional in this program and love for you to get onto a video and talk about like, Yes, this program really deserves the funding that is being asked for. And among all the noise that’s happening through all the solicitations and asking this is going to rise to the tide because you’re getting that trust and that gravitas from this professional who’s going to bring your message to the forefront. So you want to identify them? You want to empower them, engage with them and ask them to become advocates for your campaign. Now, if and their first. So they’re really carrying the message forward, right? The connectors are like just by just by posting it on Twitter today or posting on instagram or putting it on a whatsapp group, they’re naturally connecting or they’re going to an event, right? The mavens air giving you no weights and trust to the conversation. Salespeople are creating persuasive reasons why you should give and should give Maura and give even more. You line these people of strategically, you could have a much greater chance of success. All right, How much? How far in advance? Great question. So it happens in in-kind. Took 14 minutes for questions. Wait. Another 10 maybe 12 5 Feel generous it How far? So we do it, so we do it in stages. So what’s really important with crowdster radcampaign is keeping the momentum going. So you don’t want to, you know, start preparing a campaign several months before, and then you lose interest in you lose momentum, right? Because you want to complain. It’s like a plane taking off, right? So they’re usually the first people that you would reach out to you before you go public before you go public, right? so you’d reach out to a couple weeks before a couple of weeks before you know if I’m dealing with a squid newsome with university. So it would be like, let’s say, two months before the campaign and you want to. You want to give them preparation? Won’t have them prepare their message. You want to have them, you know they’re gonna go out and they’re going to speak on behalf of the school. They have questions. They’re gonna I want to, you know, you know, curate and really define their message. Probably university. That’s a bigger bureaucracy to so some of their messaging may have to be approved, but sizes smaller midsize shop. Well, College University could be a mid size small shop. You don’t need to be two months out in advance. We’ll give you an example. Influencer. Yeah, so I’ll give you an example. We did a campaign we ran a campaign for Why you in New York University and this was three years ago. We’ve done one recently also, but the 1st 1 that we did of slogan was I m y you and Lin Manuel Miranda was actually a honorary graduate of Achieve University. So We engaged with him for a video several weeks before, But then the video only launched the day before. So it’s about lining up that strategy. Decided that would be a nice shot. Exactly. I shot started every every campaign’s not gonna have a Lin Manuel Miranda. But that’s, you know, kind of an example of someone finding people who have that broad appeal and that broad network to be able to, you know, take your message further. All right. Um, what else do we have to have in place? Yeah, in advance. So them the were only on the in advanced stage. We’re not even into the way. Have 10 minutes left. So the second thing is really, really second thing is really taking messaging. Very serious. So we’re still in the preparation we’re so ever. So I’ll tell you, Tony. Oh, everything. Everything happens in preparation. Okay. If you know what I always say that once your campaign starts, it’s already over. There’s nothing you can do about it once it starts. You know, once it starts, you just if you’re waiting to it for to start for to be successful, you’re gonna lose all your friends. Okay? Yeah, because you’re just gonna be harassing people, like throughout that radcampaign beating down the door for wait. We don’t want that. That’s not that’s not the outcome that we’re trying t. Okay, It all happens before I really wanted thio off. Okay? Yeah. So the second thing is just taking your messaging very seriously. Um, and Gladwell talks about it compares it to, like, you know, the stickiness factor. You can have good messaging. Are you gonna have missing that actually sticks, right. So taking, going to the depth of your cause and your appeal and really defining the truth in the essence of what you’re trying to say. But then churning that into a bite size, you know, congest oppcoll message that has that has legs, okay. And a message that is going to be memorable easily. Big headlines will be able to, you know, the think different, open happiness. You know, those type of messaging, it works wonders in crowdfunding. And it’s so important because you know, the distance between your message and your conversion is actually really, really close. You know, you’re going on on social media and you’re saying, you know, getting to the core of an organization, Really? So getting to the heart of organization and making a real beautiful, you know? Well, well, well positioned. Ask right. You can see it conversion instantly. Be just moments instantly. And that’s what’s important, right? So 20 years ago, when you had a great man, you’re doing a billboard. You couldn’t really measure the results in the conversion of the building. Well X amount of eyes walking down next month. Today, messaging is so much more critical. You can’t mess with that because it’s like there’s so much you can gain with a better message. People are going to see some that’s really gonna be compelling. They’re gonna take action. You’re gonna have feedback immediately, instantly. And that’s also good with testing. So you can text messages. You contest the messages, you can tweak messages. Okay. Messaging? Yes. 30. Glad we’ll talk about the power of context. Okay, so context is that the timing is the right environment. The right moves, you know, it’s social. Are people prepared for it? Right. So on a practical level, you know, the do’s and don’ts of timing. And so you know, you know, for for ce que no for typical organization you want to think about. Okay? December’s a great month. You know, you’re on fund-raising. I want time up and lead my fund-raising My my crowd from the campaign to happen You’re in Line it up with your and fundez latto content. It should be leveraged year and fund-raising thing. Right? Um, if you are a religious organization, it should be before the holidays tied into tight to the holidays where people are in the mood of e-giving worth tied around Christmas for people in the, you know, in the in the giving season. So timing is really, really important. And then in the don’ts, you know, timing around Passover? Exactly. Yes. The Passover is coming up soon. It’s a great time. We have a lot of campaigns happening. Be Christmas. Just a Catholic name. Yeah, I was trying pandering. You’re pandering. Necessary called you out here. Listen. Martignetti sounds Catholic. Culwell call at Christmas. Go ahead from New York, Jewish or Christian? Celebrated Christmas. You know, it’s everywhere. You can’t get away from it. You know, I heard that, um my kids are still wondering why they don’t have a Christmas tree. That they’re not getting it um, it’s just everywhere, you know. Um, you know, it’s interesting on it. Before this company I work for my brother started a virtual currency company. This was 2012 Virtual what? Virtual currency. Currency 1012. No. One way ahead, Right. Guys got back. It was where he was just too much of a vision or way ahead. Right? So you’re talking about and there’s actually I’ve been in the last six months I’ve actually seen already three businesses that have almost the exact identical business model. Tow what we what he what he created and what we were trying to create that genius. Brilliant. Nothing bad timing right through these other three of taking off other’s movements. There’s a whole ecosystem today. Virtual currencies go today, so timing is really, really important, you know? Are you coming out with your message? Where than even the environment is ready for it? Look at that. Remember the immigration campaign that you don’t let your brother listen to this? Yeah, sure. Does he know I really wrote that rodeo? How I wrote about this kind of threw him under a bus. You know, zoho thing for him, you know, it’s it’s, it’s he’s a genius, you know? He’s, you know, he’s too smart. It’s got no time, no time, no good. You can’t invent the car now. Exactly. You remember the image of the campaign that Facebook krauz from campaign that raised like $35,000,000 for, you know, for for the immigration organization in D. C. Was a 35,000,000 crowdster. It was a $35,000,000 crowdster. That organization, before that campaign struggled to reach $1,000,000 a year fund-raising. They didn’t even have a budget of more of $1,000,000. Here they are, the timing with the entire immigration fiasco that’s that’s going on. Someone launches a campaign on their behalf, or they launch shevawn exactly sure who launched it within weeks. $35,000,000 from tens of townspeople. And and you should. You know it’s not about being an ambulance chaser. You don’t want to take advantage of situations but should be looking out for you. That’s that’s grabbing a hook Exactly. If there’s immigration news and you’re in the immigration space, I think if you don’t grab a hook, your risk being irrelevant, and I’ve had guests who have said that, and I believe it myself. I just I just repeat everything. Guess yeah. Bring smart. Don’t have any knowledge of your own. I have a good memory. All right, let’s move on. Really? Have a couple minutes left, like three or four. So more things. More things. Preparation. Mushy, please. So I’ll tell you. Great. So So you have your So let’s say you lined up all these ingredients, right? And you you line up your power of the few. You get your influences lined up to really help you can. You got amazing messaging, right? And then you have the timing’s perfect. You get even a little setup, right? Roger. And for what you’re missing right now is it’s not enough. No, no, not sufficiently. You’re missing. You’re missing. What you’re missing here is velocity. Okay, so think take up. Sorry about that. Take a plane. Take off. Right, Guys, watch one off. Yeah, take a plane. That’s mine. I put mine on airport road airplane mode for you. Uh, if I could get the same courtesy put in his pocket, but he still didn’t put it. Still did not know. You only gave me 30 minutes and going in airplane mode, yet just took in his pockets. It’s still gonna vibrate. All right, So take a plane, right? It has to reach a certain speed within a certain amount of space. Was a certain amount of time actually living velocity velocity on and lift and lift in the upper wings and believe that teacher above pressure below. So all that scientific stuff, But the point is that you need thes things to happen within within a specific amount of time for us to be able to create that combustion for it actually take off right field to hit the tipping point. Yeah. Okay, So, um, I’ll give an example of what things? People we see that people are usually doing wrong they can improve on. Is that, you know, yesterday had to come from at my talk. I asked someone like you who’s been involved in a crowd from the campaign dahna peer-to-peer of campaign, for example. And one person Me. Okay. And I said, Well, tell me how it went in these and she said, Well, they called me out, they sent me an email and then there was an event, anything, and they said you know, would you take on a campaign a page to raise $3600 for the organization. Right? And she said yes. Okay. And then when was the end? When was the organ it? When was the campaign culminating? Four months. So is the worst words four months of her life. Okay, so you need a much less time than you think you do, right? You think more time equals more money? No, no, no, it doesn’t. Less time equals more money because, you know, people are just inundated with so much information. And if you if you have the right ingredients to motivate the person to say yes, I’ll give right with by telling them, you know, whether you let’s say you put a matching component on the campaign right where you said in this and limited amount of time, your money will be matched, right? Right. Or you put it. You have a certain goal that you have to reach within a certain amount of time, that urgency, their impact recognition with everybody’s gonna be recognized. The campaign. You have all those ingredients and you have the right man. You have the right people pushing it and the context is right. You need very, very little time to actually take off. The majority of our campaigns happen in 24 36 hours. Millions are being raised in 24 3rd toe with weeks of preparation. So if you want to hit a tipping point, you can’t have, you know, miles of runway. You’ll never take off. You just drive right off the runway, and that’s it. So shorten the runway and and and prepare the ingredients that you need, as we just mentioned. But that should be all be done in the maintenance hangar. Exactly playing now, in case that wasn’t obvious. Yeah, you’re feeding off, Tony. We feel about each other is done in manufacturing. I mean, you go way back, but it’s done in maintenance, maintenance and cleaning. Yes. Okay. All right. All right. Uh, give me another minute. You got, uh, Can I? Yeah. You got one more thing. I want to wrap it up. Dahna without mentioning charity dot com. Can you Can you summarize or you want to give another tip? You know, listen, I’m here today, and I don’t do a lot of the conferences, but it’s it’s It’s fantastic to be to be here. I think the Auntie unconference is really nice, you know, some of their like way big. And there’s not a lot of you know, too big to have conversations and too small. I think this is a really, really nice sized dent. Unconference. I’ve met a lot of wonderful people here, a lot of people doing a lot of innovative stuff in this space. It’s it’s encouraging to be here to see a lot of people, you know, working towards the same goal. Yeah, all right, we’ll leave it there. Thank you for having actually. Don’t don’t walk away yet. Your your phone is Your watch is buzzing. He’s monisha Hecht. He’s the chief innovation officer at charity. C H a R D y. That’s enough shout outs for that, and you’re with Tony martignetti non-profit Radio coverage of 19 ntcdinosaur 2019 non-profit Technology Conference, Portland, Oregon All of our 19 ntcdinosaur views are brought to you by our Partners Act Blue Free fund-raising tools to help non-profits make an impact. Thanks for being with us. We need to take a break. Cougar Mountain software maintaining separate accounts for each fund-raising daily expenses and reporting to the board are all challenging. That’s why Cougar Mountain created Denali fund-raising osili Fund, a complete accounting solution specifically designed for non-profits. You know, like the Park Denali. They have a free 60 day trial at tony dot m. A slash Cougar Mountain Denali, of course, is also a mountain, but it’s Ah park in a mountain Denali fund that m a slash Cougar Mountain. Now, time for Tony’s take to the 450th non-profit radio is July 26th. Yes, we’ve been at this nine years times 50 shows. There you go. Who’s gonna be with us? Scott Stein, of course. Live music. You gotta have Scott and his 88 singing. Ah, our theme song. Cheap red wine Live in the studio. Um, of course, our creative producer, Claire Meyerhoff, live in the studio. Call ins from all our contributors. Giveaways? Yes, giveaways. I’m sure we’ll have cure a coffee. The coffee owned by the dentist that provides dental care for coffee growers and coffee workers. As you buy their bags of coffee, they’ll be there. A sponsor of the 450th will be giving away some bags of cure coffee. Always great fun. Um, we’ll have some some comedic thing. It’s too early to tell you. Don’t You don’t need to know at this point if I told you you’d forget anyway, So just be tuned in for the 4/50 and you’ll see what we’re doing. We’re giving away and, uh, what we put together. All right, that’s it. That’s Tony’s. Take two Now here is C. R M plus email plus website. Tough. Welcome to Tony Martin. Non-profit radio coverage of 1990. See, that’s the 2019 non-profit Technology Conference coming to you from the convention center in Portland, Oregon. All of our 19 ntcdinosaur views are brought to you by our partners at ActBlue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profits make an impact with me now is Isaac Shalev. He is president at Sage 70 and his topic is solving the C r M plus email plus website equation. Isaac. Welcome. Thanks very much for having me, Tony. A real pleasure. You have a real radio voice. Good podcast voice. I should start one you have right now. You have one already, right? I’m cheating. I do. I’ve been podcasting for a few years on a totally different top shot out your podcast. What is it? My podcast is called on board games, and it’s about board games. Eso head overto on board games dot net to check it out. Okay, Wonderful. That that’s obviously a part time passion of yours again. Yeah, I I design board games on the side. You designed them. I was gonna ask you, Do you talk more about classic or contemporary games? We mostly talk about contemporary games. We talk about the games industry, which is exploding these days, and we feature interviews with industry guests and talk about what’s happening at conventions and things like that. That’s what’s fabulous about podcasting. The niche niche, a board games podcast. Yeah, you could go all the way down the rabbit hole in a podcast. And there’s somebody down there listening, doing it. Yes, whatever it is. Yeah, all right, Uh, let’s do our equation. So what? What’s the problem here? Well, I think it’s an opportunity, really. More than a problem of the opportunity is to be able to know more about the people who are engaged in your mission. Whether that’s donors who are coming to your website to learn more about you or who are reading your emails because they want to know more about the work that you’re doing, um, or whether it’s program participants who you want to track as they go through your programs. You want to be able to wherever somebody touches you, no and track and engaged, which means you need a database that can store all that engagement information. But you also need connections between where the engagement happens. Right when you send an email, you need to know who opened the email in order to track that they opened it and cared about it. Same thing with the Web. When somebody visits your website, you want to know that they came and what they clicked on that’s gonna help you communicate with them about the parts of your work that they care most about. So that’s the promise of C. R M. When it’s integrated with email and with the website. The technical challenges enormous, though, because these are different systems by different vendors and different underlying technology, and making them connect is not trivial. So we’ve spent the last 15 years working on this and we’re getting there. We’re getting closer and closer each year. Are the vendors cooperating with each other? I think that over time we’ve seen a few cycles of how this kind of works. So initially we had a lot of unbundled services. You had your website on your website was I mean, even think about the pre WordPress days, right? When when people were spinning up websites on bear code. Um, and you had databases that didn’t even talk to the Web. I mean, if you were working with earlier versions of razors at your donor perfect, they didn’t have any connection to the Web. But all that’s changed a lot. Now they’re all in one systems. You know, Neon is a vendor that’s pretty popular in that space that provide content management systems as well as email marketing platforms as part of the core CR M database offering. But you can still do it. Lots of other ways and enterprise solutions are often more of a Let me pick of the best in breed for each service I want and then integrate through AP eyes, Um, and that can be very powerful, but it’s challenging, not on just the technical level, but on the training you need to train staff to be able to use multiple different systems. And you need governance. You need somebody to oversee how different systems connect and make sure that the right pieces of data move to the right place is a lot to this. All right, well, that’s what we called it. An equation, you know, were straightforward. There’s some math ap eyes. Let’s just make make that clear. We have jargon jail on non-profit radio. You’ve trapped me in. So I didn’t drop you. I was your for your You’re free falling every rolling. I walked right in and slammed the door. Okay, I know that in a p I was like, It’s a call from one to another, but you you don’t know what it stands for. You can define it better than I can. So, uh, a p I is a way in which one system defines how it wants to be spoken to buy another system. So when you use an A p I, what you’re doing is you’re sort of saying I want to move information like your name and your email address from my website, where I captured it in a form to my C R m so that I can see if maybe you’ve been a donor and I can add engagement record, I can add a touchpoint to your record. So my cr m will say, Oh, that’s great. If you want to pass me information, send it to me in a file that looks like this, right? So send it to me within column one Put the name in column to put the email and package that into a you know, an extra accept ostomel far, whatever it is. And send that to me. That’s basically what an A p I is. It’s how to structure data so that you can move from one system to another stand for something. Yeah, it stands for automatic program interface. I believe I’m not sure about the A Okay. Program interface makes sense. Yeah. Okay. Um, is there an advantage? Thio open source versus proprietary in terms of the three working together. If if you’re all open source, are you more likely to have compatibility? Oh, um or not. I don’t think that, uh, you necessarily will have more compatibility. What’s true is that open source products worm or committed to an open standard s o. They were more committed to offering AP eyes that allows data to move in and out of systems. And there were a lot of and there remained a lot of vendors who don’t yet have fully open AP eyes. In some cases, like blackbaud has been spending quite a bit of time developing their sky a p I that promises to allow open access. But the reality is that if you’re sitting in Razor’s Edge seven, it’s hard to move data in and out because there aren’t really open AP eyes. So yes, if you were in an open source system, you probably had access to open a P eyes on at least one side of things. I think generally that modular architecture, that idea that the product that I’m building should allow data to move in and out has become more broadly embraced no matter what, and open source products have faded, I think, in their relevance to the non-profit space over the last few years, So C v. C R M is no longer ah leading C R M product in the market without sails. For Salesforce’s open source business sales forces of proprietary proprietary yes, sales force is owned by the Sales Force company. I know, and I heard somebody say that it was open. Source. Sales Force has open AP eyes So let’s let’s define the difference here. Open source means that the coda that the product was written in is available to anyone like Firefox. Right? Mozilla makes Firefox. Mozilla’s an open source, right? So you can take that code. You can do whatever you want to it. You don’t have to pay anyone for it on. That’s what open source means. Sales force, on the other hand, has open ap eyes. Which means how could that I could? No. Course not. You have to report sales for separation. Yeah, All right, So So, yes, but you do want to look for that, but you do want a little lackluster. Sorry, I’m the only one. It’s Tony martignetti now, probably. Unfortunately, not somebody else’s not greater. You’re stuck here. Okay, so, yes, maybe was open a p I Maybe that’s what I misunderstood. Well, the trick is also that you have to be really concerned about the word ap I because there are, um a lot of folks out there saying we have a p eyes and they’re not wrong. They do have a P eyes, but they may not be opening all of the different tables in the database to you. So you may wanna track information in your c r M that you can’t pull from another system. Because, for example, um, you might have an email system where you can pull whether a person opened a specific email on whether they clicked on a specific email. But maybe you can’t pull which email they unsubscribes from. That’s just not an available thing to pull from there a p I So you’ve got some functionality. But when you made the decision oh, they have an A p I. Let’s use them. You might not have been aware of the limitations. S o a. P. I doesn’t mean all the data can move easily, and you really need to explore and make sure by examining the AP I documentation to dive down. Yeah, to know that it’s going to share with you the with your other system, the information that you’re expecting to carry over, right? I mean, you can imagine a donor system saying they have open ap eyes. So you could pull everybody’s name and email address, but not how much they donated. That’s not super helpful, But you could still describe it as an open A P. I Okay. Okay, good. Thank you. Straighten me out, Trainable. Stick with me. But I’m training. Um uh, learning about. See, the databases of records, FBI’s integration methods, Um, a plan for getting these technologies to talk to one another. So we have. Have you done your session yet? I’ll be doing my session tomorrow. Okay. But it’s a repeat. I did it last year. You did? No, I didn’t capture you last year. No. No. Yeah, yeah. I was doing a session at the time that you offered to me. Okay. You really gotta schedule. Maybe I invited you and you turned me down. That’s possible, too. Way invite. More than we can refill. It’s possible. It’s possible. I’m glad to be here this year. Yeah, I’m glad you are to thank you for coming this year. Well, I’ve been listening for a long time, so I think I’m excited. Thio have a chance to be on the other end of the mike. Thank you. Glad. Um, Okay. So Well, what only one with just a little bit about the fact that you’re you’re you’ve been listening for so long and gratified to be a gift. A guest. What? Well, I was I was gonna suggest that we talk a little bit about how, um today the need for integration is even greater because our stakeholders expect us to know everything right. When you come to an organization, you expect them to know whether you’ve been to an event or whether you were engaged in a particular cause. There’s just no separation from from the perspective of the donor of, ah, stakeholder between the different departments within an organization, you know, you call it, and a lot of that expectation is driven by what we are experiencing e commerce for sure. Very smart companies like Zappos, Amazon on and maybe even buy some smart charities that have raised the bar. So now we’re expecting I mean, why don’t you have the same? You have access to the same technology they do if you’re willing to invest in it. So the bar is hyre, you know, step up your game absolutely and fairly right in that we came preaching the importance of working with each individual and segmenting our communication so that everyone feels a personal connection. And if you’re gonna talk that game when the donor calls, you better know who they are. And that means that you need someone at that phone in front of a terminal where they can type in a name and see the full view of what this person has done with your organization. So the stakes are rising in terms of being able to do this and the means by which we do it keep multiplying, right. We have Maur and more channels. So it used to be that we were just doing direct mountain. We did email. Then we did text to give. And now we have ah peer-to-peer platforms. We have so many more ways in which we’re engaging. And usually it’s another vendor. It’s another system. It’s another database through which we add this functionality and a couple of years go by and some CR M pulls that functionality in and you get increased functionality within your core system. How are we gonna make this happen though you have? You obviously have to have expertise to do this. Thio, have these cross platform communications. So 11 tip, one big tip. Here’s if you listen to nothing else in this interview. I want everyone to walk away with this one big idea. Have a network map. A network map is a map that shows all the different systems that you have and arrows pointing to which system pushes data into which place. And this doesn’t sound that complicated. And the reality is, it’s not hard to do. You list all your systems and then you draw your arrows. And when you’re drawing your arrows, just indicate whether it’s an automatic move of data or whether it’s manual. Are you downloading the spreadsheet and uploading it to a new system? That’s manual. Is there an A P I. Is there an integration that does it without you having to do anything automatic? Just make that map, and now you have an opportunity, right, because now you can see where your manual processes. Maybe there’s something you can do about that where your automated ones and also you know, you you don’t want to trip over yourself. You can create loops right where one system updates the next one, the next one and the next one, and then they circle back and making a map avoids that trouble. So that’s the first step in thinking through a problem like this is make the map and figure out what’s in the middle. What’s your database of record? Where you gonna collect all that data? And if you don’t have one, that’s your first mission. Oh, if there’s nothing at your core if you don’t have a database of record, if you don’t have the place where you keep all the data, you really don’t have a way to centralize time for our last break. Turn to communications. Full service Strategic communications and PR for non-profits Turn to helps you tell compelling stories. Advocate for your cause and make a difference through media relations, content, marketing, communications and branding strategy. They’re at turn hyphen to dot CEO not dot com that CEO now here’s back to, but loads more time. Of course, for CR M plus email plus website, there’s there’s some new methods for dealing with kind of cross platform stuff. You’ve got all these tools and you’re trying Thio to be able to see he threw it through and across all of them, so you may have heard folks talking about data, warehousing, data, warehousing is it? Sounds kind of, I don’t know, futuristic in some ways, but futuristic in the most boring way, right? We don’t get flying cars. We got data warehouses, but a data warehouse is basically pouring every other database that you have into one big database. But you don’t have that database do anything, right? So in other words, just doesn’t delivery males. It doesn’t do any transaction. You can query from it right on. And so then you can query across all your different systems. And so you say, Find me the person who received these three e mails who donated at least $100 over the last year. And who cares about owls and they live in New Jersey. Perfect. Right. And I can, even though that data lives in multiple data. Very right. But if you can make that query right, then you can send that email that says who gives a hoot. And that person in New Jersey is gonna open that email right now. You’ve sold me on the value of a data warehouse. How do you create such a thing? Well, data warehouses are created mostly with open source tools. Actually s o. A lot of times you take a my sequel database and you use a P I’s to pull in data from all your different systems. Sometimes you have to download stuff and upload stuff. There’s data extraction transformation and loading process is E. T ells that go along with that? But the key is that you need and I say key because it really is about what’s called a primary key in a database. Every line every row in that database is represented by a unique identify. Something has to be unique, right? And the trouble is that everything that has the nation’s my information systems degree from Carnegie Mellon it’s paying off. Also antiquated. But you know, as antiquated as it is, that was true in 8429 week. Identify where each row right and when there is such a unique identifier than you can really make the magic happen. The trouble is, when you push three different databases into one, each database had its own unique identifier. So you Tony martignetti are 1 28 in this database and your 3 96 in that database in your 4 25 donordigital base. I’m in the employee database, right. So we need to create 1/4 unique identify in the warehouse that identifies you across those three systems. So there’s some work to do. And that’s why we recommend that non-profits do work with experts around this because data warehousing can be complex to get off the ground. But it has incredible returns in terms of transparency, invisibility of your most valuable data across multiple systems. So this means that you don’t have to take everyone’s favorite system away from them or the system that you just spent a whole bunch of money implementing. You don’t have to get rid of it because it doesn’t integrate with that system. You can keep everyone working with the tools they love while still creating transparent information and reporting for decision makers. OK, I’m gonna guess that sage 70 will, uh, will help you with this. So what’s age 70 will do is help you assess your digital infrastructure. What are all the tools that you’re using? Are they well integrated? Do you have the right staff and skills to leverage them? A lot of times you know, the trouble that you have is not your tool doesn’t work. The trouble that you have is that strategy. You’re not sure what you’re trying to achieve or how to measure it, or it’s that skills. You know what you’re trying to achieve. You just don’t have the people who can do it or they’re structured poorly. You’ve got them scattered across different departments and they’re not effective and you need to centralize them, whatever it might be, The tool itself is usually relatively far down the list, and that’s because we’re in 2019 and we’re lucky. A lot of the tools have gotten a lot better. There’s been a lot of feature convergence, so any tulani CR m you pick is gonna have a lot of the same features. And it’s less about nailing the tool and much more about understanding what you wanted to achieve, making sure your staffed for it, making sure that the data is traveling through each system the right way. So that’s what saved 70 helps with when you actually want to build the thing. They’re specialists to build that thing. This folks here, um, right here it ntcdinosaur recommend everyone talked to a fracture is a great partner in this O Matic. If you’re on razor’s edge is another great partner for this s o there folks out there who specialize in setting up your data warehouse. And it’s a process I really, really recommend that you get expertise for Ah, but ah, start with strategy, though. Figure out what’s trying to do. Right? Right. What? Why? Yeah. What’s our goal? Yeah, what’s our purpose? And which information do we need to raise the visibility of? Because one of those, one of the worst things that you can do is build a warehouse that lets you see everything and then try and look at everything. No. You gotta look at the five things that matter most. What else you gonna talk about tomorrow? Well, I think we’re gonna talk on the agenda. Well, we’re gonna talk a little bit about the, uh the different ways that vendors offer this kind of integration. So there are all in one vendors that offer you a lot of different tools under one roof. And that’s great because it’s easy to train staff in that you see familiar screens over and over again. The data on the back end is integrated, so they’re really effective. However you trade Cem flexibility, you may prefer a different email tool, but the vendor doesn’t have that. They haven’t all in one, so you have to stick with them. You might go with, you know, totally the opposite. On end of the spectrum, you might go with a platform, whether that sales force or dynamics where you ca NBA build whatever you want on this kind of core foundation, and that gives you tremendous flexibility, you can build whatever you want. It also gives you a lot of costs and challenges your skills because you can build anything if you have the money for it in the know how. Um, should you build anything that’s usually ended? Question. And there’s the maintenance of the of the custom. Build right, and you have to budget not just for the maintenance, but here’s the real l tricky one. When you build a custom system, nobody can train you in it, but you, so you have to now build a training capacity to continue supporting your system. This isn’t you know. I’ll say this over and over again. We spend too much time thinking about what it’s gonna cost us to buy our tech tools to build our tech tools to maintain our tech tools. We should be spending twice that much time thinking about how to acquire the right staff, howto retain them and how to train them to use our tools. That’s the hard part. I mean, so many people non-profits have tremendous passion and tremendous skillsets, but not often great technical skillsets. That’s part of what a successful non-profit needs to learn how to do is in bed strong skillsets in technology in their staff and be willing to invest. You have to be invested in it either either through staff or or outside help, right? I mean, you know the old joke, right? What happens if I You spend all my money training my staff and then they leave? Well, what happens if you don’t spend the money training your staff and they stay? I haven’t heard that joke. I don’t know that one. I haven’t heard that. All right, E. I wish we had a laugh track. Have an awful on trains. I’m not sure it would have been too loud. You have a good, hearty laugh yourself. That’s all right. Um, okay. We still have another couple minutes together. Uh, what else are you gonna? I don’t know. You know, based on your session description, I feel like we’ve covered everything, but we can’t have covered it all because we haven’t spent 75 minutes together. Well, we certainly haven’t. I think that, uh, one of the tricks that you have to really, uh, ask yourself is Do I pursue a C r M driven strategy? And this is something that I want every small non-profit listening to think hard about because, you know, I sat with the client ones and they were talking about how they wanted to put everything in a c r M. And what should we do? And I asked, How many donors do you have that you communicate with? And they said 500. And I said, That’s a wonderful number. You don’t need to C R M. You need a telephone. 500 donors call two a day, right? There’s your not at a point where you need the scale. And therefore you shouldn’t hamper yourself with the You know what a system is gonna tie you to, uh, there’s another small non-profit Smallish. I mean, talk about 30 employees. So not tiny. Um, but, uh, 30 employees couple $1,000,000 in revenue And they you’re using sales force, which is, by the way, fair, very challenging for small organizations to use effectively. But they had really the cleanest salesforce implementation I’ve ever seen. Data was hygienic. It was kept well, they had a sale sports admin on staff. They had another part time sales force person who really did a great job of pushing all of their donordigital and all of their program stuff into sales force. They were running every program out of sales force. And I kind of wanted to actually have a panel tomorrow about managing your managing using a c R M. To manage program. Yeah, yeah, it’s It’s certainly part of the promise of sales forces you can cross from donor to constituent tow program participants, and they made it work. However, however, there there’s a but there’s a big but lurking at the end of this one, which is that even though they were doing such a great job of that whenever they wanted to spin up a new program and they’re young enough that they’re still spinning up new programs and thinking of new ways to solve their problems. Whenever they wanted to spend up a new program, they got stuck. They got stuck in a six month sales force development cycle. We have a new program. How are we gonna administer it through sales force? We need to create new forms we need to create new business logic. We need to test it right. We need to go through the process of implementing this program into sales force. That’s really slow. You can’t sew a small organization. One of its advantages is agility and flexibility. When you take on a bigger than your class system, you may sacrifice some of that agility. Eso, you know, in our advice to them, was not to get rid of Salesforce, right? Our advice to them was, and this is crazy. But our advice to them was spend the first year of every programme in Excel and I know right, I’m a tech consultant telling you Excel is good for things, but iterated rapidly be able to be flexible. Don’t tie your data into hard relationships. Admittedly, you lose some of the benefits of structure data. It’s true. But what you gain is the ability to figure out how it’s gonna work for real. And once you figure that out, once you have some process maturity, right and you figured out what the right way to do it is, then go to Salesforce, right? Then put it into your sales force. So that’s something that I really want folks thinking about lean startup principle. That’s right. Start, start lean. You’ll learn your pivot if you need to. And then when you’ve got something that’s a year old and and proven mean, the program may not even take off right. You could spend more time in sales force development than the life of the program. Conceivably right. So when you’ve got something that you know you’re gonna stick with and you know what data capture, um, then spend your time and money on your sales force. Implementation? Yeah. Don’t overbuild your infrastructure. I mean, it’s the same idea is certainly out of the outside. It’s that same idea that you know, uh, if you’re gonna build a public space and you want to know where to put the walkways, what do you do? You wait. You wait and see where the path. Yes, yes. So it’s the same ideas and favorite. Figure out where you’re going to get a lot of bang from your infrastructure investment. Where is it going to really pay off for you on? And it’s a little bit, I think, counter to how we sometimes think about this, where it’s become so de facto that Oh, you’re gonna need to C R M and you need to see our strategy. It’s not clear to me that you need to C. R M strategy. It’s clear to me that if you want to keep track of your most important stakeholders, you’re gonna need a method for doing so. And if you have enough of them, a C R M is probably the method. Okay, okay. Give us a wrap up than solving the C r M plus email plus website equation. Well, the first thing I should say is, don’t forget, carry the one is there. Is there a solution to this equation? Yeah, I think there is a solution to the equation on, and it starts with understanding what your goals are. If you really do communicate to people. If you’re an advocacy, Oregon. You really do a ton of e mailing in a ton of segmentation. A ton of personalization, then? Yeah, you need your C r m and your email and your website to talk to one another and just not. Not just that. You need your social integrated and you need your pita pema integrated and you need your text messaging. So, yeah, that’s your core business is communicating effective segmented messaging in order to inspire actions. So it makes sense that you use that infrastructure. But that’s not gonna be the case for every non-profit. So understand. Visualize what advantage, what benefit you want out of this, and that’ll help shape your investment. What you want into this? That’s one. The second thing is, you solve this problem with the right people more than you solve it with the right tools. Invest in the right people. Whether that’s advice from consultants or whether that staff and their expertise and skills, that’s where you’re going to get the biggest force multiplier the right people. All right, Isaac shall live. He is president at Sage 70 helped us solve the C R M plus email plus website equation. I thank you very much. Thanks, Isaac. Thank you, Tony. Great to be here. Pleasure. Thank you for being with Tony martignetti non-profit Radio coverage of 19 and T. C. All of our interviews at 19 ntcdinosaur brought to you by our partners at ActBlue Free fund-raising Tools to help non-profits make an impact. Thanks so much Being with us next week, it’s the week before the 450th show. If you missed any part of today’s show, I beseech you find it on tony. Martignetti dot com were sponsored by Wagner. C p A. Is guiding you beyond the numbers weather cps dot com But Cougar Mountain Software Denali Fund is there complete accounting solution specifically for non-profits 20 dot m a slash Cougar Mountain for a free 60 day trial and by turned to communications, full service, strategic communications and PR. Turn hyphen to dot C o ah creative producers Claire Meyerhoff Sam Leibowitz is the line producer producer. The show’s show schnoll Media is buy shoes in Chavez. Mark Silverman is our Web guy and this music is by Scott Stein be with me next week for non-profit radio Big non-profit ideas for the other 95% go out and be Greek. You’re listening to the talking alternate network. You’re listening to the Talking Alternative Network. Are you stuck in a rut? Negative thoughts, feelings and conversations got you down. Hi, I’m nor in Sumpter potentially ater. Tune in every Tuesday at 9 to 10 p.m. Eastern time and listen for new ideas on my show Beyond potential. Live Life, Your Way on talk radio dot N Y c aptly named host of Tony martignetti non-profit Radio Big non-profit ideas for the other 95% fund-raising board relations, social media. My guests and I cover everything that small and midsize shops struggle with. If you have big dreams and a small budget, you have a home at Tony martignetti non-profit Radio Fridays 1 to 2 Eastern at talking alternative dot com Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business. Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested? Simply email at info at talking alternative dot com Theo Best designs for your life Start at home. I’m David here. Gardner, interior designer and host of At Home Listen, Live Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. Eastern Time. As we talk to the very best professionals about interior design and the design. That’s all around us. Right here on talk radio dot N. Y c. You’re listening to Talking Alternative Network at www dot talking alternative dot com now broadcasting 24 hours a day. Do you love or are you intrigued about New York City and its neighborhoods? I’m Jeff Goodman, host of Rediscovering New York Weekly showed that showcases New York’s history, and it’s extraordinary neighborhoods. Every Tuesday live at 7 p.m. We focus on a particular neighborhood and explore its history. It’s vibe. 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427: Flash Fundraising & DEI and Governance II – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2This week:

Flash Fundraising
Prepare. Launch. Engage. These are the essential elements for rapidly and successfully fundraising when breaking news intersects with your cause. Matt Scott from CauseMic talks us through.

DEI and Governance II
Gene Takagi and I wrap up last week’s thoughtful convo on diversity, equity and inclusion, with mechanics for your board: by-laws; recruiting; committees; decision making; oversight metrics; and more. He’s our legal contributor and principal of NEO, the Nonprofit & Exempt Organizations law group.”

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

416: Asking Styles – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2This week:

Asking Styles
In fundraising solicitations, one size does not fit all. There are different styles and personalities. Are you a Kindred Spirit, Mission Controller, or other. Brian Saber sorts them out to make you a comfortable, confident and effective fundraiser, based on what you bring to the process. He’s the author of the book, “Asking Styles.” 

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com 

391: Authentic Selves In Work & Board Change Agents – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Raj Aggarwal, president, Provoc; Sabelo Narasimhan, North American digital campaign manager at 350.org; and Glamarys Acevedo, professional development specialist for Mamatoto Village. 

Also, Greg Cohen, associate director for Cause Effective.

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com

335: Subtle Steps To The Ask – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guest this week:

Gail Perry, author of the book “Fired-Up Fundraising: Turn Board Passion Into Action.” 

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com

324: Successful Tech Projects & Inauguration Social Networks – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

tony_martignetti_300x300-itunes_image2Tony’s guests this week:

Smita Vadakekalam, vice president of professional services at Heller Consulting, and Sandy Reinardy, managing director, gift and constituent records, for the University of Wisconsin Foundation.

Also, Amy Sample Ward, our social media contributor and CEO of NTEN, the Nonprofit Technology Network.

There’s more at tonymartignetti.com

049: The Morning After (The Big Event) & Giving USA 2011 Report – Tony Martignetti Nonprofit Radio

Tony’s guests this week:

Lisa Reilly, executive director, The Emelin Theatre
Tara Slone, principal, Marketing Matters
Jessica Weber, principal, Jessica Weber Design
Holly Hall, features editor, The Chronicle of Philanthropy
Robert Evans, editorial review board member, Giving USA

Read and watch more on Tony’s blog: http://mpgadv.com

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Welcome to the show, this is tony martignetti non-profit radio, and i’m your aptly named host. We’re always talking about big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent help you were with me last week when i had a conversation with ken berger, president and ceo of charity navigator ken came on the show and announced charity navigator three point oh, we talked about the directions that cnn would like to move non-profits toward and how it’s inducing them to get there this week, the morning after the big event, three guests explain how best to follow-up your events and why it’s important to include follow-up plans in your pre event preparations. This is the first of my interviews from the exhibit floor at the fund-raising day conference in new york city last month. Then the e-giving yusa two thousand eleven report holly hall, features editor for the chronicle of philanthropy, will be with me to talk about her concerns from last year’s report and whether they’re answered in this year’s. This is a follow up to our discussion a few weeks ago on the show, then i’ll be joined by bob evans from the reports editorial board and he’ll share some important conclusions. Fromthe e-giving yusa two thousand eleven report in between the guests. As always, tony’s take two at roughly thirty two minutes into the hour. This month is the one year anniversary of the show, and we’re bringing on some regular monthly contributors, a team for legal compliance and a prospect research guru. I’ll introduce you to them on tony’s, take two. Also, if you’ve heard me speak and liked what you heard, that i’m going to ask for your help, both of those on tony’s take two in between today’s guests. Right now, we’ll take a break, and when we return, it’ll be the morning after the big event. E-giving didn’t think the ending the ending, depending. You’re listening to the talking alternate network e-giving. E-giving cubine. Are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping conscious people. Be better business people. Buy-in are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics politically expressed. I am montgomery taylor, and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com looking to meet mr and mrs wright, but still haven’t found the one i want to make your current relationship as fulfilling as possible. Then please join us, starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with morning alison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Please tune in and call as we discuss dating relationship and more. Start your week off with love in the morning with marnie alison on talking alternative dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. Welcome to tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of fund-raising day two thousand eleven, we’re at the marriott marquis in new york city. My guests right now are lisa reilly, tara sloan and jessica weber. They’re seminar topic is provocatively the morning after the big event. Lisa riley is executive director of the ml in theatre. Tara sloane is principal of marketing matters limited, and jessica weber is the principle of jessica weber design incorporated. Ladies welcome murcott so let’s, start with you what hyre what? What can we do to extend the reach of events after the event is over? Well, i think there’s some sort of standard practices that we all think of as being kind of businesses, usual things, like remembering to thank our attendees after the event and one of the things that we suggested this morning is that it’s particularly useful if in that, thank you, you’re making sure that you’re still talking about the mission of your organization and that you’re extending the feel of the event and reiterating for people why they came to the event and what it was about, and we found in particular at the emlyn that one of the effective ways to do that is if you include a link to back to the website or to say there were pictures of the event to make sure that people have a reason to come back and look again at what you’re doing with these. Are you sending that? Thank you? Buy paper mail and also by email. So the link is wait, do about okay, terra is there a suggestion you’d liketo open with for extending the reach of events? Speak a lot closer, please. I think one of things we talked about is how important the pre planning for the post event is meaning planning in advance of the event. Who will do what? When the event is over. And while that’s often thought of as a boring task, it’s one of the most important it sounds like something that typically gets for gotten in planning for the event. Is that it’s? Not only for gotten but when it’s remembered the thought is, oh, we should have done this weeks ago. How could we have left this for you? Because the day after, people are excited about about what just occurred there, patting themselves on the bath about the event, but they’re not necessarily ready. Teo gear up the energy required for post event. So if the pieces have put into place before hand, they’re able it works much more successfully. Thank you. And jessica, what advice would you like to open with for extending the reach of events? Well, basically, we have a design from that only works in the not-for-profits sector. We encourage our clients to create brochures talking about their mission that are included in the event material and after the event, when lisa sends out a thank you letter to her attendees that she include a small brochure on the organization and some giving pieces so that the e-giving opportunity keeps going on after the events over really so it’s appropriate to include a solicitation material in the thank you for coming sometimes it is absolute terror is nodding. Also, please support it’s definitely important and it’s it’s really critical because we would assert that events are not just about the event it’s about building a relationship with all of the people who attended the event. So one of the ways in which which you build the relationship is immediate communication, post event and inviting. Them to support the great cause that they attended the event. Ok. And lisa, in your work with ml in you don’t get objections to solicitation material it’s included in the in the thank you for coming, we’re actually i think it is organization specific, and we’re a little sneaky about it. Good. Well, let’s, talk about it on dh. What we do is our event is near the beginning of our season. We have our event big event in october, which is the beginning of the m ellen’s performing arts season, so our thank you asks them to come to the theater when they come to the theatre, we asked them to give money so rather than including the asked directly in the thank you, we know that we’re going to have other opportunities to continue to build. That relationship is, tara says on one of the ways we want to build that relationship is to encourage them to be at the theater often. Okay, so, tara, let me ask you the same question that since you’re advocating this, your clients are not getting objections to solicitation material sent in the thank you, i think, if if it is done tactfully it works on clients are not objecting and remember that many of the people who are attending the events are guests of other people so they may not have. They may not have necessarily made a contribution yet individually, so this gives them the opportunity to just get sound like you want to say something about doing this tactfully, inappropriately, and another way of doing that is also to send out a newsletter a month or two after the event, to all the attendees with pictures of the event and talking about it so that you start to capture a family of friends it’s really important when you have an event to capture the people who are there to make friends for life, and by doing a newsletter every three or four months, it gets that across, and we also include e-giving envelope in the news, all right, but let’s talk a little more detail about that that first thank you that they get afterwards doing that, including a solicitation in that and doing it tactfully, appropriately what’s your advice for for that first communication after the event, well, usually the development director of the executive director will send a personal note thanking them for their attendance and personally signed, never a mass mailing. Absolutely even if there’s seven hundred fifty people, even if they’re seven hundred, the waldorf seven, because basically, how often do you get astounded when you actually get a hand written letter with a stamp on it these days? You know, it kind of knocks you out because everything is pre printed, so that little personal note with a real stamp means a lot to donors, okay? And about a terrible i just would like to suggest that one way to do a mass email let’s, say and make it meaningful is to give the guests of the event ideas ways in which the funds will be used. So talk to talk about the specifics, programmatic elements of the agency and let so in other words, for so and so amount of money you are contributing to support this cause, they’re program that we have for the next level, this is what you’re so that really makes it more personal and compelling beyond that would be something that they get right after the event terror right after the event, ok? Yeah, you’re listening to the talking alternative network. Geever are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you, too? He’ll call us now at to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three that’s to one to seven to one eight, one eight, three or find us on the web at www dot double diamond wellness dot com. We look forward to serving you. Is your marriage in trouble? Are you considering divorce? Hello, i’m lawrence bloom, a family law attorney in new york and new jersey. No one is happier than the day their divorce is final. My firm can help you. We take the nasty out of the divorce process and make people happy. Police call a set to one, two, nine six four three five zero two for a free consultation. That’s lawrence h bloom two, one two, nine, six, four, three five zero two. We make people happy. Hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com lisa, are you spending any time at the event preparing attendees for the follow-up that that the theater is going to send? Well, we make because it is the beginning of our season, a big part of what i speak about it. The event is what’s going to happen at the theater over the coming months, so they know that they’re going that we want time to attend, but also that we need their support to make those events happen. And so there is a kind of, um, nuanced, i guess, you know, sort, subtle pitch to say to people that this this kind of work which is meaningful in our community doesn’t happen unless we have your support, and so part of your support is coming to the gala, but the next part of your support is attending the events and and picking some of these very specific projects. So, for example, last year, the theater needed a new protector because we have a film siri’s and saying to the gal audience, you can help, and this will make a real difference in how we can deliver our programs. Jessica, do you have advice on that about the same? Question i asked lisa preparing people at the event for the follow-up that’s that’s going to come? Wait do advise our clients were basically a design from we’re not a development firm so good. So that it’s usually our development director that will tell us what they need created to soon? Yes, in terms of design of the of the evening. Exactly. Did you have something, please? Yeah, so i just like to add that part of what i was, what i was opening with a minute ago was the idea of how the pre event planning, how important it is, and by working with the event committee and the board in advance of the event to determine what next steps might occur. For example, we might have a parlor events at so and so’s home planting, planning and then planting the seeds for those events at the main event. So in other words, tony, you’re you know, we’re going to invite you in a few weeks to join a mission coming to learn more, and it could be learned more about the agency or it could be we’re going to give you more value because we’re going to deliver. Some content that’s relevant to the mission of the organization, you’ll be interested in hearing this. I’m gonna shift a little bit what’s your advice, anybody about a situation where you have, uh, chair of an event, and i’m now i’m thinking bigger event, not like you were just talking about lisa tower, maybe a parlor event, but something larger and really all the all that chair is willing to do is share their vendor list and show up that night and share the event they’re not motivated around all the planning and to are to the point of your seminar, the post event work. Anybody have advice for that? Working with difficult chair who has to be the chair? Well, i think in the m ellen’s case, what we try to do is build a strong committee, so that because it certainly does happen that there are sometimes prominent people who are for one reason and others selected to chair an event who either are unwilling or unable just to spare the time to do the kind of rigorous, detail oriented work that needs to be done. And so we find a larger committee who will commit themselves to that kind of detail work that’s also the work of the board, frankly, so we prepare our board to say, you know, part of their job is to go to the gala and have fun, but another part of it is that they’re out talking to people about what we’re doing, and i think another way you can think about that is when, for example, of boardmember is engaged with someone who says, i really like the dance siri’s at the emblen one of the things that boardmember is doing is cultivating that person as a donor, coming back to the staff, coming back to the board and saying, you know, joe told me he really likes the dance siri’s, how do we make sure that joe’s engaged in the dance siri’s so there’s lots. I think there are lots of ambassadors, and the chair is a very visible ambassador, but not the only ambassador. Actually, we’re going to that. Come back to the committee in a second with lisa reilly, tara sloan and jessica weber. We’re talking about their seminar at at fund-raising day two thousand eleven, which is the morning after the big event. Let’s talk more about the committee the committee is critical. Jessica, what did you want to add to the sum a committee? It is critical to helping the organization get the event off the ground, whether it be working with the auction, the silent auction, even when we designed all the graphics there’s, always someone on the committee who we work with to make sure that the designs we create reflect the evening and each i mean, i’ve sat personally on many committees and it’s imperative that you get a really active goodcompany he’s. So let’s talk about that who’s best to talk about recruiting the right committee, who wants to go ahead. So in terms of the right committee, i would assert that it’s really important to have people who represent the different target segments of your population. So whether that’s from a geography standpoint, you have people on the committee who represent different geography is or you have people who are different ages representing different prospects and current supporters that you really think through, make sure the committee is representative of the people you want the agency to read, to be able to reach out to, okay and understanding at the same time with respect what lisa said, that they may be supplementing a chair who’s unable or unwilling to do a lot of the heavy lifting. Yes. And in addition, while there is often one share, there are ways in which to have journal chairs or committee chairs so that you’re giving that chair roll to more than one person, particularly in the situation where thie it may be that one of the chairs is in name only since the topic of your seminar is extending the reach of the event let’s switch to ah smaller event may be it is a parlor event elearning half a dozen or a dozen couples in someone’s home is the is extending the reach of that event different than the larger seven hundred fifty people in the waldorf. This aria is there. Is there more any more personal approach? Because it was an event with just twelve or twenty twenty people. How do we, uh, how do we follow-up to those smaller, more intimate events? So i think the smaller events you have fewer people to connect with and you have a more personal experience and more of a one on one with the people who attended so it’s very easy to pick up the phone so a phone call and find out what it was interesting to the guest about the organization and what they’re interested in going forward learning, knowing, supporting, okay, but doing it by phone. Lisa does emelin host small events like that? We do have some smaller events, and in one sense every performance that we hosted the theater is a smaller event, and one of the things that we found is very important at the theatre is that someone either myself or one of the board members welcomes thie audience on dh makes a real pitch for people to be actively engaged, whether that’s e-giving time or money or bringing coming to another event. I think one of the challenges in a small organization is people sometimes are a little hesitant to make the ask and sort of closed the loop. And to me, when you say, you know, what’s, the difference between a big event and a small event at our smaller events, the real challenge is to make sure that we have said very specifically we need you and we need you to give and we need your time and that can feel difficulty in a smaller room than in a bigger room. But it’s absolutely the reason tohave a smaller event and making sure that that actually happens both at the event and after the event, and plus the people you invite to those smaller events are typically more committed, or and maybe you’re asking them to bring someone who doesn’t know the organization very well, and that might that might be a strategy for broadening the reach, right, it’s all about personal relation in ship. So if the person who invited them is a dear friend or family member, they are more likely to be very positive. Lee predisposed to getting a phone call or personal touch from the director of the organization who their loved one cares very much about jessica. Thanks, tara. What about use of social media? Can you can you talk? I know you know you’re work is designing the event. What are you thinking about using social media in extending the events? Reach? It really depends on the size of the organization and if they can, in fact support social media, we have larger clients who have someone completely. Devoted to it, who’s writing the block whose our problem is that if an organization doesn’t have the manpower to support it, there’s nothing worse than going and seeing a block with six months old right here. This is a lot of apologies were sorry for not blogging sooner. More and more recently, for junior committees, i think social networking is fabulous when some of our groups are clients have junior committees and junior memberships, they social media is the way to go to connect for them and most of their invitations or invites great since you you please dara. Increasingly, i think facebook is a must have for an event and the earlier that you get the facebook page live and the more people that you can get to friend the page, the more valuable it is and it’s interesting, because just a few years ago i didn’t even exist, you know, now we’re having a contest. We’re giving away three ipads outsourced to ipads at three thirty, so if you each like the facebook page before you leave, which were set up to do right here, you can join the contest. He’s a younger events jessica raised that elisa, are you are you cultivating people in their twenties and say up to mid thirties and emily very much we are, i think that that’s ah difficulty audience for performing arts organizations in particular, tio teo, particularly the suburbs, perhaps to garner there are very they certainly are very different about how they engage with social media and print media. Where, just tell us, where is the evelyn theater? We’re in westchester, so we’re just north of new york city in a town called mamaroneck. Wait for it all that’s, not it’s, not upstate new york it’s not upstate, but it is not below fourteenth street. People from the city think of it as a lot of people from the city think of his upstate. I live in the city, but i don’t think of that, all right? So younger people in the suburbs not so much coming out for theatre, not so much to a performing arts centers. They i think there’s a different way that younger people engaged with the arts. They are more likely, for example, to go to a club somewhere where they can move and dance and interact as opposed to sitting in a seat and watching something happened, andi that’s not just true in the suburbs that’s if you look at places like the ninety second street y here in the city, you’ll see that they’re discounts for younger attendees because it is a challenge to get people below a certain age to engage in that particular format. Andi, i think they’re uneven. Bigger challenge, frankly, to engage in your fundraising efforts. Your work is designing events. Let’s, talk about designing events, jessica for people in their twenties. What do your thoughts there? Well, we just did something that was a skating thing in woman woman drink it was very successful. It was for one of our clients who only wanted to reach out to thirty and unders, and we didn’t even fight. There was facebook page and it was very well attended. It was a way of getting younger new yorkers to get involved with in this case is the new york city police foundation, and slowly, we’re hoping that the organization will nurture them so that they’ll become bigger and bigger contributors, and most of the time these events are not very expensive two hundred fifty dollars or less, they invite their friends and it’s, a way of store getting them into become donors, you know, it’s, a way of educating them. So one. One of the things that we think about do is that building thie relationships is all about building a tribe of people who care goldenburg tribe and the so to build that younger tribe, you need a few key younger people who care about the organization and reaching them. And identifying them is a one on one conversation. Jessica weber, lisa reilly and tara sloane there. Seminar topic was the morning after the big event. I want to thank you very much for joining tony martignetti non-profit radio coverage of the fund-raising day conference two thousand eleven. Ladies, thank you very much. Thank you, thank you. You’re listening to the talking alternative network. Are you feeling overwhelmed in the current chaos of our changing times? A deeper understanding of authentic astrology can uncover solutions in every area of life. After all, metaphysics is just quantum physics, politically expressed hi and montgomery taylor and i offer lectures, seminars and private consultations. For more information, contact me at monte m o nt y at r l j media. Dot com are you stuck in your business or career trying to take your business to the next level, and it keeps hitting a wall? This is sam liebowitz, the conscious consultant. I will help you get to the root cause of your abundance issues and help move you forward in your life. Call me now and let’s. Create the future you dream of. Two, one, two, seven, two, one, eight, one, eight, three, that’s to one to seven to one, eight one eight three. The conscious consultant helping huntress people be better business people. Oppcoll hey, all you crazy listeners looking to boost your business? Why not advertise on talking alternative with very reasonable rates? Interested simply email at info at talking alternative dot com welcome back, it’s, time for tony’s take two at roughly thirty two minutes after the hour. This month is the one year anniversary for the show, and i’m really pleased, excited tio bring on some regular contributors to the show. Of course we have scott koegler who’s, our tech contributor he’s, the editor of non-profit technology news, and he joins us once a month. Teo, help explain technology and it’s used for non-profits so we’re going to bring on some additional experts one set in july, and then someone in august joining me starting on july twenty ninth is going to be jean takagi and emily chan. They are both attorneys, the their practices, the non-profit and exempt organizations, law group or neo-sage is in san francisco, and jean is also the publisher of the non-profit law blawg, dot com and emily is a frequent contributor to that block again, they’ll be with me first show on july twenty ninth. Then on august twelfth, i’ll be welcoming another regular contributor, prospect research expert maria simple maria is the prospect finder, and you’ll find her at the prospect finder dot com she’s goingto share prospect research advice for your non-profit and she also will be on once a month again. First show august twelfth have you heard me speak and have you liked it? Check out my block post, which is called have you heard me speak and liked it? That’s an m p g a d v dot com someone is compiling a list of the best speakers in philanthropy, and i’d be grateful to have your vote. The details are at that block post on my block, and that is tony’s take two for friday, july eighth. Coming on now is holly hol. Holly is features editor for the chronicle of philanthropy, welcoming her back to the show. Holly welcome back, pleasure to have you thank you. Glad to be here. Thanks. We’re talking about the e-giving yusa two thousand eleven report. So just to recap from your last appearance on this show in in june, there were some concerns we talked about from the two thousand ten report, which was on two thousand nine’s e-giving can you just recap a little bit? Yes, e-giving you say estimated that individual e-giving help study in two thousand nine and declined overall for total giving by all sources by just a small percentage point. And we thought that that was a little suspicious given our calls all over the country, showing much steeper declines in two thousand eight and nine. Okay, so this year, giving us a came out and has revised figures for, oh eight and nine and so now they’re reporting a cumulative thirteen point two percent drop in a way, and nine cumulative droppin await no nine. And how much of a drop from oh eight. Two o nine. Because that was the that was the two thousand ten report on two thousand nine giving. So what was the well? Okay, it was there now saying in a six point two percent down adjusted for inflation and no nine and another seven percent down in eight that’s a cumulative thirteen point two percent. Okay, it was the steepest drop in the fifty six, um year old survey. Okay, so it’s saying that e-giving is not quite as resilient as we thought in in a recession or in a battle bad economic time generally that’s, right? Ok, because the belief had been that it was quite resilient. But then how does that compare to the to the downturn? Let’s? Say, in the dow or, you know, in another stock into season. It’s. Not as bad as that that’s. True. First of all, i think we all have to keep in mind these air. Just estimate. And we may never know how much e-giving fell. But it is. Nice to see that that these figures have been adjusted to be more in line with what many organizations experience during the recession on, and it wasn’t just your chronicle philanthropies research, but there were other organisations as well that we’re saying that e-giving had declined considerably from a wayto nine yes, sir been several studies that show that on the council for aid education found a steep drop e-giving colleges and universities, thie association for health care philantech be found a double digit decrease e-giving um and ironically, the shevawn philantech rezone research wealthy individuals found that the wealthy decrease their giving by large margins as well. There was also concerned because two advisers to e-giving yusa, professors service and havens, schervish and havens i had questioned the two thousand ten report after they did some of their own research on two thousand nine giving we talked about this a couple of weeks ago you and i and they had factored in consumer confidence and unemployment have you seen any change in the methodology? It’s giving us a tow to factor in variables like that? Yeah, state. It’d make a change to look at patterns of personal consumption. I asked them why they didn’t use consumer confidence, and they said that they would much rather look at actual spending rather than confident. They thought that a better measure, okay, and how about unemployment and any measure of that variable? They didn’t look at that, okay, are they not o k now, we didn’t invite someone from giving us a talk about the methodology of the report, and they weren’t able to do that on. We do have bob evans coming, but he’s going to talk about the editorial side of the report, not the methodology side he’ll be on shortly. Holly, were there other things that you were looking for in this year’s report on? Did you find them just the correction? They now show that giving in twenty ten increased by about two percent. But that’s it still far from making up for the thirteen over thirteen percent drop that was found for the two years of recession? Sure, but we’re still not back to where we were. Another interesting thing about the survey is they showed that corporate giving corporate support went up, and that does not really but dive with what we hear anecdotally, and it totally. Corporate giving is very challenging for many groups, and they still haven’t recovered losses that they endured during the recession years. One possible explanation for that. Maybe that companies are donating more products. In-kind donations. Non-cash. Okay, e-giving in different ways, in-kind and maybe volunteerism to, i think, is one of the conclusions than cash. Holly. We have to leave it there. I want to thank you very much for summarizing and coming back on the show and following up, thank you very much. Thank you, tony pleasure. Holly halls, the features editor at the chronicle of philanthropy with me now is bob evans. Bob is founder and managing director of the hl consulting group, but he’s here in his capacity as a member of the editorial review board of giving yusa bob evans welcome to the show. Good morning, pleasure with pleasure to have you. Thank you, thanks for joining us. E-giving yusa has ten pretty pretty firm conclusions based on it’s ah, it’s research. Why don’t you just remind the audience what the methodology is, what the process is generally behind e-giving yusa and then we’ll get into a couple of these conclusions that you have e-giving us favorite. Very. Data from a variety of sources, including the i r s and and it would be a reflection of friends in america in every nation. Lovely, elegant about general figures, a revised and additional agents and data that the irs from for-profit filing vigils and patient foundation. But accurate. Careful analysis, general. In fact, bob bob, i’m going to interrupt you. Would you would you mind hanging up, please, and calling right back? We have awful connection. Okay, thank you very much. This is bob evans, he’s on the editorial board of the e-giving yusa report and he’s, unfortunately, cutting out kind of badly, he was saying that it is an annual report and it is revised twice. So azali hall pointed out the the each report is an estimate. So we want to be fair to giving yusa recognizing each report is an estimate, and then they do revise their numbers. Twice after the initial report, a cz bob evans was saying, bob, you back with us? Okay? I’m hoping we have a better connection. Let’s move to some of the conclusions about e-giving one of those is that americans remained generous in difficult economic times. What? What? What? Leads the e-giving usa and e-giving institute, the sponsors of the over report. Teo, conclude that even though it’s been a great fashion over the last several years, america funded credibly, where there were hills forgiving and kills for make failed at all of this. Bob, but i’ll tell you what way have awful connection. You’re just, you’re not coming through again, out let’s, do this. We’re gonna take a quick break. The producer will call you and give you some some advice about how may we can improve this. So so why did you hang up? We’re going to take a break, and when we return, it’ll be bob evans talking about giving yusa two thousand eleven report stay with us. I didn’t think that shooting the good ending things, you’re listening to the talking, alternate network duitz get in. I think. Cubine looking to meet mr and mrs wright, but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your current relationship as fulfilling as possible? Then please join us, starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with morning alison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Please tune in and call as we discuss dating relationship and more. Start your week off with love in the morning with marnie alison on talking alternative dot com. Talking alternative radio twenty four hours a day. This is tony martignetti aptly named host of tony martignetti non-profit radio big non-profit ideas for the other ninety five percent technology fund-raising compliance, social media, small and medium non-profits have needs in all these areas. My guests are expert in all these areas and mohr. Tony martignetti non-profit radio friday’s one to two eastern on talking alternative broadcasting do you want to enhance your company’s web presence with an eye catching and unique website design? Would you like to incorporate professional video marketing mobile marketing into your organization’s marketing campaign? Mission one on one media offers a unique marketing experience. I will set you apart from your competitors, magnify your brand exposure and enhance your current marketing effort. Their services include video production and editing, web design, graphic design photography, social media management and now introducing mobile marketing. Their motto is. We do whatever it takes to make our clients happy. Contact them today. Admission one one media dot com talking. Bonem metoo welcome back, we think we’ve got technical problems solved and a much better connection with bob evans. Bob, you still there, right? I’m here. Ok, that is much, much better. This is an important point, so i’m actually going to just ask you to repeat what you had said about the giving us a report conclusion that americans remained generous in difficulty. Economic times. Americans have never shied away from giving to legitimate non-profits across united states and in fact, across the globe, uh, two hundred ninety one billion dollars were restricted to non-profits during two thousand him according to the giving us a report. And even though that’s a slight uptick from what was deceived or reprogram reported both in two thousand eight and two thousand nine, this is a great testimonial, two american generosity, no other country, no other group of people anywhere on the planet given generously give us frequently and give us passionately as what has been the result over the last year. And i think this is something that is to be highlighted e-giving is a certain it is certainly an important part of the us economy and i respond. People respond when called upon. And where there is a n’importe need to balance, i think you heard holly hall. She was on just before you there was ah declined a thirteen percent roughly declined a cumulative decline in two thousand eight in two thousand nine because of the recession, i have admitted, you know, that there’s a, uh, impact on the economy that does reflect in terms of e-giving but still e-giving was very serious component of the us economy, and that will not vanish. Another conclusion is that planned e-giving must and that’s that’s the reports word must be incorporated into fund-raising plant e-giving of course, the long term giving through wills and charitable trusts, charitable annuities? Why does the report conclude that plan giving is so important approximately eight percent of all giving in america? I came from the plant giving or the quest in two thousand ten, so we’re talking about twenty three billion dollars worth of, uh, support for non-profits this is more than corporate giving and is very serious effort, especially as baby boomers are aging and as americans are aging, that one of the things that were saying to non-profits across america is that you must incorporate a plan e-giving component into your fund-raising master plan if you’re not concern cering plans giving, you are really going to be left out in the er the wild, because this is such an important part of activity. But now the colleges and universities of america have really been working the baby boomer population and it’s starting to pay off handsomely for them in the form of a request. Okay, that eight percent figure that you cited that’s eight percent of total giving or eight percent of the individual giving number it’s eight percent of all giving in america. Okay, and i think these first two conclusions that we’re talking about that americans as individuals remain generous on dh, that plan giving must be incorporated, that that points to the importance of individual giving. And in fact, when one of the things that we say is that eighty, eighty seven percent of all giving in america truly comes from individuals living in bed because a certain percentage of foundation giving and be attributed to individuals and a certain percentage of corporate e-giving can be attributed individual, and you’re able to tease that out in the reports and for us, yeah, yeah. So that’s the week day, eighty seven percent of all giving comes from individuals living in bed. Okay? And that includes the foundation and corporate support that individuals are responsible for definitely a component of corporate giving and a component of foundation giving indefinitely, and the foundation support was not reduced as much as foundations had threatened or thought would be the case. We had expected much deeper cuts by federation by foundations in two thousand ten, primarily because foundation many foundations, especially large one stepped up during the great profession with larger than expected support for non-profit projects and causes uh, because most foundations use a three, four or five year rolling average in terms of return on their principal, we had expected much deeper decline from foundations. But thankfully, wall street cooperated and the portfolios of foundations uh, we were able to recover very significantly from the downturns of two thousand eight and nine. So the non-profit world on received much stronger support than we would have projected. I think that this will be a question mark that also will continue for another year or two as foundation portfolio. Try to recover what they had lost during the great recession what’s. The proportion of total giving that foundation support contributes foundation support his response for forty one billion dollars, or about fourteen percent of the pie for two thousand ten. And just curious. How does that compare with corporate support? Corporate support is only five. Okay, so that it that again, when you add individual giving, which seventy three percent request e-giving which is eight percent foundations fourteen percent in corporate at five, one hundred percent, you know? And we have just about a minute and a half before we have to close arts and culture giving so increases. What can you tell us about that? I think culture go up and down like a yo yo, especially because of very large e-giving both from individuals, dam’s foundations. In two thousand ten, our cultures saw a larger piece of the pie. Five for them was four percent. And we think this is a good sign about future support for the arts in america. But that increase was due to some, i guess, a few very large gifts. So there’s. Very, very large. Uh, which is also what impact this category of the ten categories. All right, so so that may mean for most arts and culture organizations, unless they were among the few who got some of these large gifts. They may not be feeling that that increase that’s, right, but it’s been is a mentality here is that we believe has turned around, and we’re especially optimistic and are telling that our clients that they have to work harder and ah, very directly with donors at all levels but were especially out to think about that category. Bob evans is founder, managing director of the e e h l consulting group, and he was sharing his expertise a za member of the editorial review board of giving yusa bob, thank you very much for your time. My pleasure, it’s been a pleasure having you i want to thank lisa reilly, tara sloan and jessica weber from fund-raising day two thousand eleven on dh, letting us replay that interview from from june and also, of course, holly hall from the chronicle of philanthropy and bob evans from the editorial review board of giving yusa next week. Partnerships, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions sandra lamb of lamb advisers talks about collaborations of all kinds between non-profits when are they? Write for you when should your board be talking about? Um, how do you decide what organizations to collaborate with and what’s the process, then engaging generations x? And why leslie goldman and casey rotter from the us fund for unicef share their expertise in this area. They are both in those generations, but i did not ask their ages all of next week’s guests were recorded at the fund-raising day conference in new york city last month, and in the coming weeks i’ll have even more of those conversations from fund-raising day you can keep up with what’s coming up by signing up for our insider email alerts, go to the facebook page, facebook, dot com and then the name of this show sign up there for the alerts and, like us, become a fan of the show, you can listen to the show anytime on the device of your choice by subscribing on itunes, and you’ll find our itunes paige at non-profit radio dot net, the creative producer of tony martignetti non-profit radio is clear meyerhoff today’s line producer and the owner of talking alternative broadcasting is sam liebowitz. Our social media is by regina walton of organic social media. This is tony martignetti non-profit radio for july eighth, two thousand eleven. I hope you’ll be with me on july fifteenth, two thousand eleven, right here on talking alternative broadcasting, always at talking alternative dot com. I didn’t think that shooting the ending. Cubine you’re listening to the talking, alternate network. Things get e-giving duitz looking to meet mr and mrs wright but still haven’t found the one. Want to make your car relationship as fulfilling as possible? Then please join us starting monday, may second at ten am for love in the morning with morning alison as a professional matchmaker, i’ve seen it all. Please tune in and call as we discuss dating relationship and more start your week off with love in the morning with marnie alison on talking alternative dot com. Are you suffering from aches and pains? Has traditional medicine let you down? Are you tired of taking toxic medications, then come to the double diamond wellness center and learn how our natural methods can help you to hell? 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